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Anthropology

The department offers two tracks within the concentration of anthropology: cultural anthropology and archaeology. A student must choose one of these two tracks.

CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY
A track in cultural anthropology consists of a minimum of 10 courses: 106 or 108; 113, 114 or 115; 126, 127, or 201; 358; 440; and five other courses. Prospective concentrators are encouraged to take 358 as early as possible because it must be completed by the end of the junior year. All concentrators, especially those planning graduate studies, are advised to take a course in statistics. Concentrators must fulfill their Senior Project requirement through satisfactory completion of the Senior Seminar (440), which emphasizes the critical evaluation of scholarship as well as primary data culminating in a research paper. Concentrators with a departmental average of 3.3 (88) or higher at the close of their senior fall semester and a B+ or better in the Senior Seminar may pursue honors through 560, an individual project under the direct supervision of a member of the department. To receive honors, a grade of A- or higher must be earned on the thesis.

Beginning with the class of 2016, a track in cultural anthropology consists of a minimum of 10 courses: 106 or 108; 113, 114 or 115; 126, 127, or 201; 358; 500 and 501; and four other courses. Concentrators must fulfill their Senior Project requirement through satisfactory completion of the Senior Seminar (500) in the fall, which emphasizes the critical evaluation of scholarship as well as primary data culminating in a draft of a research paper, and the Senior Thesis (501) in the spring, which emphasizes expansion, revision, and refinement of the thesis. Honors will be granted to students with a departmental average of 3.3 (88) or higher at the close of their senior fall semester and an A- or better on their Senior Thesis (501).

Beginning with the class of 2017, all but two of the ten courses required for the Anthropology Concentration should be taken with faculty whose primary appointment is in the Hamilton College Anthropology Department; this includes visiting faculty. Any request for exceptions may be discussed with the department chair.

ARCHAEOLOGY
A track in archaeology consists of a minimum of 10 courses: 106 or 108; 113, 114, 115, 126 or 127; 325, 358, and 441; and five other courses, one of which must be 210, 234, 243, 245 or 249. Additionally, students are strongly encouraged to take the field course (280), as well as a statistics course and courses in geosciences, biology or chemistry. Prospective concentrators are encouraged to take 325 and 358 as early as possible because both must be completed by the end of the junior year. Concentrators must fulfill their senior project requirements through satisfactory completion of the Senior Seminar (441), which emphasizes the critical evaluation of scholarship as well as primary data culminating in a research paper. Concentrators with a departmental average of 3.3 (88) or higher at the close of their senior fall semester and a B+ or better in the Senior Seminar may pursue honors through 560, an individual project under the direct supervision of a member of the department. To receive honors, a grade of A- or higher must be earned on the thesis.

Beginning with the class of 2016, a track in archaeology consists of a minimum of 10 courses: 106 or 108; 113, 114, 115, 126 0r 127; 325, 358, 510 and 511; and four other courses, one of which must be 210, 234, 243, 245 or 249. Concentrators must fulfill their Senior Project requirement through satisfactory completion of the Senior Seminar (510) in the fall, which emphasizes the critical evaluation of scholarship as well as primary data culminating in a draft of a research paper, and the Senior Thesis (511) in the spring, which emphasizes expansion, revision, and refinement of the thesis. Honors will be granted to students with a departmental average of 3.3 (88) or higher at the close of their senior fall semester and an A- or better on their Senior Thesis (511).

A minor in anthropology consists of five courses, one of which must be at the 100 level and one of which must be at the 300 level. A student may elect to take one each from 106 and 108, 113, 114, 115, 126 or 127 as two of their five courses. Note to juniors and seniors: The following Anthropology Department courses have no prerequisite: 201 and 225. In addition, prerequisites may be waived with consent of instructor for 243, 249, 270, 315, 360 and 361.

266F Dialects of American English.
This course examines the dialects of English used in the United States. Topics covered will include language variation, language change, regional dialects, social and ethnic dialects, gender and language variation, style, applied dialectology, and ideologies of language (Writing-intensive.) Maximum enrollment, 20. Meredith Moss.

Courses in Anthropology

113F,S Cultural Anthropology.
Cross-cultural approaches to the study of social structure, polity, economic behavior and belief systems. Anthropological methods of analysis of nonliterate, peasant and complex contemporary societies. Not open to seniors or to students who have taken 114 or 115. Julie Starr.

126F Language and Sociolinguistics.
Fundamental linguistic principles (phonetics and phonology, grammar and syntax, lexicon), language change processes and linguistic manifestations of social structure such as race, class, gender. (Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning.) Not open to seniors or to students who have taken 127. LaDousa.

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127S Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology.
Fundamental linguistic principles (phonetics and phonology, grammar and syntax, lexicon), the ethnography of communication, and the relation of language to cultural principles and practices. (Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning.) Not open to seniors or to students who have taken 126. Urciuoli.

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[201S] Linguistic Theory: A Brief History.
A general examination of the nature of language. Topics include the history of ideas about language; philosophical and cognitive aspects of language; evolutionary, structural and generative approaches to the analysis of language. (Writing-intensive.) (Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning.) Prerequisite, 126, 127 or consent of instructor. Next taught spring 2016 Maximum enrollment, 20.

[205S] Topics in Japanese Linguistics.
This course explores Japanese phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics. Students will compare Japanese with English and examine universal perspectives of language. (Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning.) Prerequisite, 110, Anthropology 201 or consent of instructor. (Same as East Asian Languages and Literatures 205.)

219/319F Language Acquisition.
Examines interface phenomena between pragmatics and language acquisition. Students will learn theoretical issues of semantics/pragmatics and the theory of the first language acquisition. Target languages to examine various phenomena are Chinese, Japanese, Korean and English. (Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning.) (Same as Education Studies 219 and East Asian Languages and Literatures 219/319.) Kamiya.

225S Phonetics and Phonology: The Analysis of Sound.
How the sounds of language are produced. The structure of sound systems in a variety of languages (including non-European). Organization of field projects: data collection, transcription analysis. (Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning.) Urciuoli.

230S Morphology and Syntax.
This course explores the relationship between word formation and sentence formation by examining English and Japanese grammar (and, to a certain degree, that of other languages). Ultimately, both morphology and syntax play important roles in the interpretation of sentences. No previous linguistics background or Japanese language background is necessary. (Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning.) (Same as East Asian Languages and Literatures 230.) Masaaki Kamiya.

231S Societies of the Middle East.
Exploration of Middle East societies and culture with attention to geography, ethnic groups, social divisions, gender issues, and religion, and to literature, and art and popular culture. Focus on contemporary society with consideration of the enduring presence of historical phenomena. Examination of influences producing unifying and stabilizing effects on societies of the area, particularly factors causing dislocation, discords and internal tensions. Comparative examination of social power, social change and cultural diversity in the region. (Writing-intensive.) Prerequisite, 113, 114, 115, 126, or 127, or consent of instructor. Maximum enrollment, 20. Koukjian.

233F Anthropology of China.
This course introduces students to social issues in contemporary China as seen through the lens of anthropological analysis. Through reading ethnographies, watching films, and engaging in classroom discussions, we will examines topics such as the individualization of China and consumer identity, censorship and emerging forms of social media, urbanization and migrant labor, the one-child policy and changing family values, and economic development and environmental degradation. Prerequisite, One course in anthropology or consent of instructor. Julie Starr.

235S Multi-ethnic Israel.
The course will examine the diverse society of Israel. It will focus on different Jewish ethnic groups, their cultural traditions and how ethnicity itself has played a central role in shaping Israeli society. The course will begin with a study of the Zionist movement and the corresponding waves of immigration of Jews to Israel. Some issues that we will address along the way include: the Zionist movement’s attitudes towards the ‘negation of the Diaspora’, the ‘melting-pot approach’ to diversity, the range and types of ‘Sephardic protests’ that arose over the years, and the politics of ethnicity as it has been witnessed in and through events like the rise of the ‘Shas’ (religious-political) Party. Our objective in this course is to examine the political, sociological, and cultural implications of this demographic composition and how it manifests in contemporary Israel- in social life, music, film and popular culture. Anat Guez.

237S Indigenous Heritage Language Revitalization.
Examines language endangerment and revitalization programs around the world. Analyzes the practices of more and less successful programs including Maori, Hawaiian, and Navajo, as well as the roles of technology and social media in grassroots language revitalization. (Writing-intensive.) Maximum enrollment, 20. Meredith Moss.

[255] The Languages of East Asia.
Examines Chinese, Japanese and Korean as well as other languages found in East Asia. Topics include the syntactic (possible word order, inflections, particles, and combinations of all of them) and phonological structures (phoneme, pitch vs. tone, sound patterns) of these languages; the relationships of the languages to each other; differences and similarities of these languages from the universal point of view; the geographical, social and historical settings. No knowledge of any Asian language necessary. (Same as East Asian Languages and Literatures 255.)

[257] Language, Gender and Sexuality.
Stresses special lessons that anthropology has to teach about the gendered facets of linguistic expression, including the necessity of an approach that is both empirical, including moments of interaction, and critical, exploring issues of power and agency. Considers conceptual benefits and limitations to using gendered difference as a model for sexual difference in the study of linguistic expression. Prerequisite, one course in anthropology or consent of instructor. (Same as Women's Studies 257.)

259S Digital Technology and Social Transformation.
Examines some of the ways in which digital technologies have been imagined to be important to social change, transformation, or innovation. Proponents of the use of digital technologies toward social change have focused on their speed, connectivity, and capacity. The course will introduce some of these arguments, will review some critiques of these arguments, and will suggest – via ethnographic cases – that digital technologies, like all sociocultural forms, should be studied with careful attention to contextual concerns. Prerequisite, One 100-level course in Anthropology or consent of instructor. Chaise LaDousa.

264S Ethnography of Literacy and Visual Language.
Theory and analysis of communication and meaning in social and cultural context with particular attention devoted to the often-neglected aspects of literate communication. (Writing-intensive.) Prerequisite, 113, 114, 115, 126, 127, or 201, or consent of instructor. Maximum enrollment, 20. Ladousa.

[270F] The Ethnography of Communication.
Theory and analysis of communication and meaning in social and cultural context. (Writing-intensive.) Prerequisite, 113, 114, 115, 126, 127 or 201, or consent of instructor. Maximum enrollment, 20.

[302S] Seminar in Linguistic Semiotics.
Focused examination of the nature of meaning as constituted through the formal structures of language (grammatical and semantic) and its pragmatic (social) functions. Strong emphasis on data-oriented analyses. Specific topics may include grammatical classification, comparative morphology, diachronic (historical and sociolinguistic) issues, the relation of discursive process to grammatical formation. (Writing-intensive.) Prerequisite, 126, 127, 201, 270 or consent of instructor. Next taught spring 2016 Maximum enrollment, 20.

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306S Seminar: Black Europe.
Europe is a contested site of identity, citizenship and belonging where post-colonial African and other populations are increasingly visible. This crisis constitutes a critical moment in European history. Focusing on the lives of people of African descent the course examines such issues as colonial legacies, what it means to be part of this new Black diaspora, political subjectivities, citizenship and belonging, gender, anti-blackness, border conflicts, and the international refugee crisis. (Proseminar.) (Same as Africana Studies 306.) Maximum enrollment, 12. Merrill or Carter.

[311] Youth and Cultural Reproduction.
The notion of youth as a lifespan period has grown in salience and pervasiveness in the world. Explores three major aspects of social scientists’ attention to youth: as a category to probe intersections among culture, aesthetics, and class in post-industrial societies; as a means for imagining the relationship between colonial and post-colonial forms of governance; and as a means for tracing the flows of capital among nation-states. Youth thus provides us with a window into pressing concerns in late-20th and early-21st century social science. Prerequisite, 100-level anthropology course or consent of instructor. (Same as Education Studies 311.)

[318] Anthropology of Education.
Examines the school as a site for the reconstruction of cultural difference. Special attention paid to links between schooling and the nation, to connections between schooling and modernity, and to themes such as discipline, value, gender, language and labor. Examples from Bolivia, Tanzania, India and the United States, among other nation-states. Concludes with a consideration of globalization, specifically the rise in neoliberal approaches in the governance of school systems. Prerequisite, one course in anthropology or consent of instructor. (Same as Education Studies 318.)

[323S] Verbal Art and Performance.
Traces historical shifts in oral performance-based approaches to the study of verbal art. Probes connections between verbal art and notions of tradition, authenticity and heritage — the local and the national. Introduces emerging work in feminist, critical and reflexive stances in scholarship on verbal art. Prerequisite, one course in anthropology or consent of instructor.

[326S] Semiotics of Liberal Arts Education.
Examination of liberal arts education as a social institution: its history, institutional structure, social location, and cultural meaning. Particular attention to tensions between its economic and prestige dimensions. Ethnographic accounts and analyses of various aspects of student life, teaching, administration, admissions, and development. Prerequisite, Any Anthropology course, or Sociology 211, or consent of instructor.

[328S] Globalization and African Diaspora in Europe.
Europe is a contested site of identity, citizenship and belonging where postcolonial populations have become increasingly visible. Focusing on the lives people of African descent and the border between Europe and Africa, explores globalization in contemporary Europe while examining such issues as economic and political restructuring, border politics, colonial legacies, national and ‘hybrid’ identity, transnationalism, the meaning of ‘home’, humanitarianism and refugees, European immigration policies and detention spaces, and the politics of fear. (Proseminar.) (Same as Africana Studies 328.) Maximum enrollment, 16.

358F History of Anthropological Ideas.
A consideration of major paradigms in anthropology from the 19th century to the present. The influence of various theoretical perspectives on ethnographic and archaeological description and analysis. (Writing-intensive.) Prerequisite, 106, 113, 114, 115, 126 or 127. Maximum enrollment, 20. Goodale and LaDousa.

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360S US Discourses I: Race, Ethnicity and Class.
An analysis of legal, scientific, commemorative and media public discourses that connect ideas about U.S. identity and citizenship with race, ethnicity and class. Prerequisite, 113, 114, 115, 126, 127 or consent of instructor. Urciuoli.

[361S] US Discourses II: Science, Technology and Gender.
An analysis of public representations of technology and science as these relate ideas about gender to ideas about being American. Prerequisite, 113, 114, 115, 126, 127 or consent of instructor. Next taught spring 2017

[370S] Sociolinguistics of Globalization.
Explores the relationship between language variation and change, on the one hand, and the movement of sound and image in the wake of social and political economic processes variously identified as globalization, on the other hand. Of special concern are the ways in which processes of globalization are mediated by institutional and national forms. Prerequisite, One course in anthropology or by instructor approval.

500F Senior Seminar in Cultural Anthropology.
The research process as it relates to the fulfillment of the senior project, including the formulation of a research problem, frames for research, research design, collection of data and cultural analysis. department.

501S Senior Thesis Project in Cultural Anthropology.
The research process as it relates to the fulfillment of the senior project, including the revision of the draft created during the senior seminar and extension of cultural analysis. Honors in the concentration partly depends on an A- or higher in the course. department.

Courses in Archaeology

106F,S Principles of Archaeology.
An introduction to the fundamentals of archaeology, with emphasis on evolutionary principles. Topics include a review of archaeological field methods such as sampling, survey and excavation, and analytic methods such as dating, typology and formation processes. Three hours of class and one hour of laboratory. (Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning.) Maximum enrollment, 24. Department.

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[108] Humans Before History.
Reviews the biological and material culture records of humankind before the advent of complex societies. Assesses fossil evidence for evolutionary relationships among human ancestors, evaluates the development of technologies and adaptations, and explores cultural achievements of modern humans during and following the last ice age.

110F Archaeology of Hamilton's Founding.
As an archaeological canvas, Hamilton College provides oral tradition and integrates historical documents. Its archaeological record on the lands it occupies within Northeastern North America can be peeled back in layers, focusing on both prehistoric and historic components from the first peoples in the area, the influence of Samuel Kirkland, and changes in the College over its history. Includes excavation of an archaeological site on the campus, several field trips to local historical societies and use of College archives. (Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning.) Maximum enrollment, 16. Nathan Goodale.

[243S] North American Prehistory.
The history of Native American cultural development north of the Rio Grande prior to European contact. Topics include the timing and effects of human entry into North America, ice-age adaptations, plant and animal domestication, agriculture and beginnings of complex societies. Prerequisite, 106 or consent of instructor.

[245S] Human Ancestors.
A review of the biological and cultural evolution of humans. Topics include human uniqueness, race and biological diversity, the earliest humans in Africa, radiations of fossil and modern humans. Includes laboratory. Prerequisite, 106 or Biology 110; Geosciences 103 or 105. Maximum enrollment, 24.

249F,S The Archaeology of Continental Discovery.
Explores the social, organizational and environmental consequences of initial human colonization of unoccupied landscapes. Examined through case studies, including initial colonization of Australia and North America, and the voyaging expansion of people across Pacific islands. Also addresses the consequences of European "rediscovery" of these areas for native peoples and environment. Prerequisite, 106 or consent of instructor. Jones.

250F Hunter-Gatherers.
Humans lived as hunter-gatherers for 99% of our evolutionary past. Today, just a small fraction of the world’s population lives as hunter-gatherers and that number is rapidly decreasing due to modernization. Anthropologists and archaeologists are interested in studying the adaptive range of modern hunter-gatherers in order to help interpret the archaeological record. Explores the ethnographic and archaeological study of hunting and gathering with a focus on analogy and inference developed in ethnoarchaeology and behavioral ecology. Prerequisite, 106 or consent of instructor. Goodale.

[251S] The Archaeology of Hamilton's Founding.
As an archaeological canvas, Hamilton College provides oral tradition and integrates historical documents. Its archaeological record on the lands it occupies within Northeastern North America can be peeled back in layers, focusing on both prehistoric and historic components from the first peoples in the area, the influence of Samuel Kirkland, and changes in the College over its history. Includes excavation of an archaeological site on the campus, several field trips to local historical societies and use of College archives. Prerequisite, 106. Maximum enrollment, 12.

[281Su] Archaeology Field Course I.
A three- to four-week introduction to archaeological field techniques, including excavation, survey and mapping. Conducted in conjunction with field research programs of faculty. Prerequisite, 106 or consent of instructor. Extra cost. Maximum enrollment, 8.

[282Su] Archaeology Field Course II.
A three- to four-week session building on training in archaeological field techniques received in Archaeology 281. Conducted in conjunction with field research programs of faculty. Prerequisite, 281. Extra cost. Does not count toward the concentration in archaeology or cultural anthropology. Maximum enrollment, 8.

325F Analytic Methods in Archaeology.
A survey of analytic techniques central to archaeological and paleoecological interpretation. Laboratory performance of artifact analysis and classification, computer-aided data management and statistical analysis. Three hours of class and three hours of laboratory. (Writing-intensive.) Prerequisite, 106. Maximum enrollment, 8. G T Jones.

334S Method and Theory in Archaeology.
An examination of the historical development of modern methodological and theoretical approaches and problems in American archaeology. Space-time frameworks, typology, form and function, research design, evolutionary, ecological and behavioral theory. Prerequisite, 106. Maximum enrollment, 24. Jones.

380S Geographic Information Systems.
Concepts in computer-based GIS emphasizing hands-on practice in portraying and analyzing spatially referenced data sets to produce a variety of types of digital products and to solve geospatial problems. Practice using data from multiple sources, including data downloaded from online sources, field-collected data and published map data. Emphasis on mastery of basic skills and techniques using ESRI ArcGIS software. (Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning.) Prerequisite, Arch 106, 108 or 110, or consent of the instructor. Maximum enrollment, 15. Nathan Goodale.

510F Senior Seminar in Archaeology.
Critical evaluation of selected topics in archaeology. Primary research, culminating in a paper for fulfillment of the senior project. department.

[511S] Senior Thesis Project in Archaeology.
Continuation of participation in Archaeology 551 with revision and expansion of the senior thesis. Honors in the concentration is partly dependent on an A- or better in the course.

(from the Hamilton Course Catalogue)

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