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Mathematics

The curriculum delves deeply into a wide range of the many and varied branches of mathematics. As a math lover at Hamilton, you’ll find yourself congregating with like-minded peers, talking shop outside your professors’ offices in CJ. You’ll learn within a curriculum that delves deeply into the many branches of math and take courses that foster deductive reasoning, persuasive writing and analytical and quantitative problem-solving.

Jonah Boucher '17
As part of his summer research project, Jonah Boucher ’17 works on a custom remote-operated vehicle that collects samples of biofilm (patches of bacteria) from a meromictic lake near Syracuse, N.Y.

A math lover’s perspective: challenges, collaborations and multiple options

It seemed like all the math Jonah Boucher ’17 had learned so far came crashing together in his 300-level Real Analysis course – in a good way. “It felt like the first step into the real world of mathematics. And what was so surprising about it was a lot of it was late 18th-century, early 19th-century math. The Math Department sort of starts to feel like history once you get into the 300s and 400s, where you are working your way through the history of math. And even stuff that old is still mind-blowing,” says Boucher, who won three awards for outstanding academic performance his first year at Hamilton. His other major is environmental studies, with a biology focus. He figures that with two strong majors in his pocket he will have lots of options, including grad school, after he graduates. Boucher spent the summer after his sophomore year doing research with a professor to analyze certain chemical and microbiological properties of a meromictic lake near Syracuse, N.Y.

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Mark Kasdorf ’06
“Serial entrepreneur” Mark Kasdorf ’06, shown here at the Intrepid headquarters, has launched four companies since he graduated from Hamilton.

A graduate’s progress: an entrepreneur in motion

As a math major at Hamilton College, Mark Kasdorf ’06 studied theorems and wrote proofs aplenty. He doesn’t crunch the hard numbers anymore, but he solves problems daily as CEO and founder of the iOS application development consulting firm Intrepid Pursuits. He was named Emerging Executive of the Year by the Mass Technology Leadership Council. In 2011, he launched Hamilton’s first business pitch competition to introduce entrepreneurship to students.

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