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Anthropology

Research Opportunities

Every other summer, the department offers an archaeology field course. Students spend two months in the desert of Nevada implementing methods learned in the classroom. Excavation takes place at one of the earliest archaeological sites in North America, dating to more than 10,000 years ago. Students explore a variety of field methods and gain the experience living and interacting in a field camp.

A Sinixt Pithouse in the Slocan Valley.
Piecing Together the Past: Artifacts from 2,700 Year Old Village

Although many people might not find archaeology as exciting as it’s portrayed in the Indiana Jones franchise, Morgan Biggs ’16 does. Biggs, an archaeology major, is working with Assistant Professor of Archaeology Nathan Goodale to analyze artifacts from the Slocan Narrows Archaeological Project (SNAP). Last summer, Biggs attended Hamilton’s field school, led by Goodale, and excavated artifacts from the Slocan Narrows Pithouse Village in southeastern British Columbia, Canada.  More ...

Nine Students Awarded Class of '79 Travel Grant

Nine Hamilton seniors have been selected to receive the Class of 1979 Student Travel Award. The award, established by the alumni of Hamilton's Class of 1979, offers financial assistance to Hamilton students who wish to pursue extensive research projects in different parts of the world.  More ...

Maggie Haag '15, left, teaches English to refugees at Conkling School in Utica.
Hamilton Student Teaches Literacy Via Technology

Utica has the fourth highest concentration of refugees of all cities in the United States. Many of these immigrants struggle to adjust to American culture and language. Through a Kirkland Summer Associate project, Maggie Haag ’15 is trying new ways to use technology to teach refugees English and help them to understand American culture.  More ...

Participants in 2013 archaeology field school in British Columbia, Canada
Students Excavate Pithouse in British Columbia

Eleven students from Hamilton College, Western Connecticut College and Selkirk College are participating in a six-week intensive archaeology field immersion course in the prehistory, history, ethnography and language of the indigenous peoples of the interior Pacific Northwest. Program director, Assistant Professor of Anthropology Nathan Goodale was interviewed on “Radio West,” a program on CBC/Radio-Canada on July 6 about the field school and its goals.   More ...

Chaise LaDousa with Paige Cross '13 and Anna Zahm '13 at the NEAA Conference.
Hamilton Represented at NEAA Conference

Associate Professor of Anthropology Chaise LaDousa and Hamilton seniors Paige Cross and Anna Zahm presented papers at the Northeastern Anthropological Association Conference.  More ...

Professor Chaise LaDousa, Melissa Segura ’14, Grace Parker Zielinski ’14 and Anna Zahm ’13.
Researchers Examine Relationship Between Language and Citizenship

Learning English is one of the most daunting tasks for newly arriving immigrants in the United States, and it can be a task that is accompanied by little support. Anna Zahm’13, Grace Parker Zielinski ’14 and Melissa Segura ’14, have spent their summers working to combat this problem by providing much-needed assistance to English language adult students at the Utica access site for the Madison-Oneida Board of Cooperative Educational Services (BOCES).  More ...

Cupola