DCF94280-E8F7-F166-A62F886D097067AC
F5BA4390-FD5A-25D3-78419AEB9BC17BD0

History

Research Opportunities

The Department of History encourages its students to study abroad for a semester or a year during their stay at Hamilton. Typical destinations for history majors include Spain, France, Italy, England, China, Austria and Japan. Many of these can be visited through Hamilton-affiliated programs. While study abroad is an integral part of the liberal arts curriculum, it has special resonance for students of history as they study events and issues at their source and in their larger cultural context. Students who wish to get honors in the history major must complete at least one year of study of a foreign language at the college level.

All Hamilton history courses stress the development of rigorous, critical reading and research skills. A number of history majors build on these skills by receiving funding to work in collaboration with faculty mentors during the summer as Emerson or Levitt Fellows. History students' knowledge of the world and habits of critical thinking are enhanced by closely working with their professors, who are themselves active in their own specialties.

Alessandria Dey '15, right, with Rochester police officer Michelle Velez.
Alessandria Dey ’15 is Intern with Rochester Police Dept.

With mounting security and paranoia in today’s world, general feelings towards the police have shifted from adoring to uneasy. Alessandria Dey ’15, a history major, is working with members of the Rochester Police Department focusing on community outreach. “They hope to build better relationships between police and the citizens of Rochester,” she explained.  More ...

Leigh Gialanella '15 at the Oneida Community Mansion House.
Leigh Gialanella ’15 Studies Print Culture of the Oneida Community

Emerson project recipient Leigh Gialanella ’15 is examining the print culture of the 19th century Utopian religious community known as the Oneida Community and founded in 1848 by John Humphrey Noyes.  More ...

Mackenzie Leavenworth '15, right, on site in Gournia, Greece, during a 2013 Emerson research expedition with Professor John McEnroe.
26 Students Awarded Emerson Research Grants

Recipients of the 2014 Emerson Summer Grants were recently announced. Created in 1997, the  program was designed to provide students with significant opportunities to work collaboratively with faculty members, researching an area of interest. The recipients, covering a range of topics, are exploring fieldwork, laboratory and library research, and the development of teaching materials. The students will make public presentations of their research throughout the academic year.  More ...

John Boudreau '14
John Boudreau '14 Presents at Phi Alpha Theta Conference

History major John Boudreau ’14 presented a paper titled “Savages and Indians: European Perceptions of Native Americans in the Canadian Fur Trade 1754-1819” at the New York State Upper Regional Conference of Phi Alpha Theta, the history honor society, at SUNY Oneonta on April 12. The faculty panel at the conference selected Boudreau’s paper as one of the six best presented.  More ...

Nine Students Awarded Class of '79 Travel Grant

Nine Hamilton seniors have been selected to receive the Class of 1979 Student Travel Award. The award, established by the alumni of Hamilton's Class of 1979, offers financial assistance to Hamilton students who wish to pursue extensive research projects in different parts of the world.  More ...

Turner Trapp '15
How Mathematical Logarithms Aided the Royal Navy

Mathematical logarithms and history might seem unrelated to one another, but this summer Turner Trapp ’15 is conducting interdisciplinary research into the role mathematical developments have in history. In his Emerson Foundation project, “The Discovery of Logarithms, Their Application to Ballistics, and Their Role in the Royal Navy’s Rise to Dominance in the Age of Sail,” he is working with Professor of History Kevin Grant to examine how the development of logarithms relates to England’s rise to naval dominance.  More ...

John Boudreau '14 at Williamstown's Clark Art Institute.
Boudreau ’14 Savors the Art of History at Clark Museum

John Boudreau ’14, a history major, never expected to be an expert on art history. However, working as a communications intern at the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute this summer has provided him a detailed knowledge of painters such as Winslow Homer. Boudreau has also been able to develop his writing skills and gain experience toward possible careers in curatorial work or journalism. His internship is supported by the Richard and Patsy Couper fund.  More ...

Anderson Tuggle '14
Anderson Tuggle ’14 Studies Princely States

While studying abroad in Rajasthan, India, Anderson Tuggle ’14 assumed he would experience a new and unfamiliar culture. He was not aware that he would uncover a chapter of history that is largely forgotten. In his project funded by the Arthur Levitt Public Affairs Center, Tuggle is researching India’s political integration after achieving independence from Britain.  More ...

Josh Yates '14
Yates ’14 Researches Less Publicized Secular Israeli-Haredim Conflict

The Israeli-Palestinian conflict is at the forefront of Middle Eastern news coverage, but another conflict of nearly equal importance taking place within the borders of Israel has largely escaped media coverage. As a Levitt Summer Research Fellowship recipient, Joshua Yates ’14 is researching the internal struggle between Israel’s secular Jewish population, which identifies with Judaism but does not strictly adhere to Jewish law, and its ultra-orthodox population of Haredim.  He is working with Professor of History Shoshana Keller.  More ...

Cupola