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Neuroscience

Research Opportunities

Research is a constant in the life of a neuroscience major and it can come in many forms. At Hamilton, senior neuroscience majors do an intensive research project and there is also opportunity to conduct collaborative summer research with a faculty member.

Students and faculty members often co-author papers that are presented at national conferences and published in leading scholarly journals. In recent years students have published in such journals as “Behavioral Neuroscience” and “Experimental Brain Research,” and they have been authors of presentations at the annual meetings of the Society of Neuroscience, Cognitive Neuroscience Society, Psychonomic Society, Organization for Human Brain Mapping and the Neurobiology of Language Conference.

Top neuroscience majors may be selected for the Senior Fellowship Program, in which up to seven Hamilton students undertake a major research project under the supervision of two or more faculty members. Recent senior fellows in neuroscience have studied octopamine and single neurons.

The Doctor Will See You Now

Bellevue Hospital Center, which was founded on March 31, 1736, is the oldest public hospital in the United States, and has always been focused on individualized care for the patient. Charlotte Beers ’16, a neuroscience major, is experiencing this quality care first-hand as a research associate at the Manhattan-based care facility.  More ...

Alex Mitko '16, Katie Callahan '15, Hannah Zucker '15 and Christi Westlin '15.
Oh Say, Can You See? An Examination of Visual Attention

Scrutinizing the pages of Where’s Waldo?, searching for that pesky beanie and striped shirt, your brain is working hard to spot the elusive traveler. This summer, four students are examining various components of visual attention with Assistant Professor of Psychology Alexandra List. Katie Callahan ’15, Christi Westlin ’15 and Alex Mitko ’16 are each working on one of the three elements of the study, “Visual Attention: Failures, Dynamics and Interaction with Auditory Attention,” and Hannah Zucker ’15 is doing an interdisciplinary project.  More ...

Cameron Davis, Amy Wright '15, Joseph Posner and Dr. Argye Hillis, stroke expert and head of the lab.
Brain Attacks: Stroke Research at Johns Hopkins

According to the American Heart Association’s 2014 heart disease and stroke statistics, stroke is responsible for one out of every 19 deaths in the United States.1 Although stroke is a leading cause of serious long-term disability, Amy Wright ’15 has learned “that strokes can be preventable and manageable, to an extent.”  More ...

Sarah Izzo '15
Sarah Izzo ’15 Examines Judicial System through Neuroscience Lens

For her Levitt Summer Research Fellowship Grant, Sarah Izzo ’15 is working on a project with Professor of Philosophy Rick Werner titled “Brains on the Stand: The Implications of Emerging Neuroscience Research on our Judicial System.” Izzo is examining new neuroscience research on topics like decision-making and free will as well as associated technological advances (such as improved precision in lie detection).   More ...

Nine Students Awarded Class of '79 Travel Grant

Nine Hamilton seniors have been selected to receive the Class of 1979 Student Travel Award. The award, established by the alumni of Hamilton's Class of 1979, offers financial assistance to Hamilton students who wish to pursue extensive research projects in different parts of the world.  More ...

Student researchers in the lab.
Got Calcium?

“Got milk?” For a group of Hamilton student researchers, the well-known slogan might be modified to “Got calcium?” The most abundant metal in our bodies and a valuable component of milk, calcium serves functions well beyond building strong teeth and bones. Hamilton research students, working with Douglas Weldon, the Stone Professor of Psychology, are examining how our mental processes depend on calcium.  The compound performs lesser known, but essential, roles in blood clotting, chemical signaling and action potential firing.  More ...

Sandhya Rao '15, Gretchen Walker '14, Rebecca Gaines '15, Sarah Mehrotra '14, Noah Levinson '14.
L.A.B. Lab Crew Helps Support New Model of the Brain

Everyone uses language on a daily basis, but few question exactly how we understand what another person is saying.  Interpreting gestures and sounds seems natural to us, yet there is a much deeper and more scientific explanation to it all.  More ...

Sarah Mandel '15, Carrie Cabush '15, (Alex Cates '15 pictured on monitor), Summer Bottini '14, Mahima Karki '14
Tracking Movements to Find Answers

Picking up a spoon to stir your morning coffee seems uncomplicated enough, right? We simply see the object and move our hand until it is close enough to grab it. But how much harder does it become if the object gets smaller or farther away from us? Or what happens when we start using our non-dominant hand? Perhaps most of us could make an educated guess at how much harder it would make the task, but Paul Fitts took it one step further beyond just estimating.  More ...

Allison Reeder '14
Reeder '14 Undertakes Neurological Disorder Research

Reserach has found that it’s more startling to hear a single loud sound than a soft sound followed by a loud sound. This neurological phenomenon is called pre-pulse inhibition and exists so that the body can adapt to loud stimuli when it is supplied with a warning. Allison Reeder ’14 has been awarded a science summer research grant to study pre-pulse inhibition in rats under the direction of Stone Professor of Psychology Douglas Weldon.  More ...

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