DCF94280-E8F7-F166-A62F886D097067AC
DCFBE660-C8A8-F3F9-09D0716C5C541EB0

Hispanic Studies

The Hispanic Studies Department offers a diverse curriculum that includes Spanish language study for both non-heritage and heritage speakers, and Latin American, Spanish and U.S. Latino/a literature and culture studies. In our Centro Universitario de Estudios Hispánicos in Madrid we also offer courses in social sciences, art, cinema and dance. The Hispanic studies concentration consists of nine courses numbered 140 or higher, including 200/201, and 210 or 211, one elective in the 200 series, three electives at the 300 level or above — including at least one in both Latin American and Peninsular fields (one of these must focus on literature before 1800) — and one course at the 400 level. Concentrators must also fulfill a cultural requirement that can be met through study abroad or a cultural studies course. Any course offered by another department that focuses specifically on Latin America, Spain or U.S. Latinos/as may satisfy the 200-level requirement but will not count as one of the nine concentration courses. Concentrators may include one course in translation as one of the required courses for the major. Five of the nine courses required for the major must be taken at Hamilton. It is strongly advised that all concentrators study abroad in a Spanish-speaking country.

In order to complete the Senior Program, senior concentrators in Hispanic Studies (non-honors candidates) will: 1) enroll in a 300-level course or Hispanic studies 400 in the fall semester, and a 400-level course in the spring semester (in the spring seniors will complete a research project in a 400-level course; spring semester advanced courses are doubly designated as 300/400 [i.e. 310/410], in order to distinguish seniors who are writing the senior research project from other students. Thus if a senior plans to take more than one advanced course in the spring, he/she should take only one course at the 400 level); 2) participate in an assessment of oral proficiency in an interview conducted by outside examiners in the fall semester. Concentrators may not normally fulfill the requirement for the major through the election of a 200-level course during their senior year.

Senior honors candidates will: 1) enroll in Hispanic Studies 400 in the fall semester; 2) enroll in 550 and complete a senior thesis in the spring semester; 3) participate in an assessment of oral proficiency in an interview conducted by outside examiners in the fall semester. In order to attain honors in Spanish, students must have an average of 3.5 (90) or better in the nine courses required for the major and must complete 550 (senior thesis) with an A- or better. Senior honors candidates who are studying in Spain (with HCAYS) during the fall of their senior year are exempt from the Hispanic Studies 400 requirement. A complete description of the Senior Program is available in Christian Johnson 202.

The Hispanic studies minor consists of five courses numbered 140 or higher, including 200/201 and 210/211, and at least one course at the 300 level. One of these courses may be taken in translation. Three of the five courses for the minor must be taken at Hamilton.

THE ACADEMIC YEAR IN SPAIN
The Academic Year in Spain was established in 1974 to offer the highest interdisciplinary academic standards in foreign study programs (distinguished professors, small classes and a rigorous Spanish-only pledge), along with careful attention to the intellectual, cultural and social needs of each student. Directors-in-residence are drawn from the Department of Hispanic Studies at Hamilton College. The program is administered at Hamilton by a general director and by the programs abroad committee, and representatives of Swarthmore and Williams Colleges serve as directing advisors to the program and are instrumental in deciding important curricular and administrative matters and in long range planning. Also affiliated with the program are Amherst College and Princeton University. A board of advisors, drawn from such institutions as Bates, Brown, Bryn Mawr, Bucknell, Colby, Grinnell, Harvard, Reed, Scripps, Smith, Stanford, Wellesley and Yale, further helps in matters of recruitment and student preparation. All courses are taught entirely in Spanish and include language and linguistic studies, culture studies and study in the social sciences. Courses offered include advanced language, the art of translation, the history of Spanish art, cinema, analysis of poetic texts, Cervantes, contemporary theater, 19th- and 20th-century Spanish and Latin American narrative, contemporary Spanish and Latin American history, the economy of Spain, anthropology, sociology, contemporary Spanish politics, flamenco and studio art. The program also offers internships sculpted to each student's area of interest and preparation. Students are taught by faculty members from leading universities in Madrid. The Centro Universitario de Estudios Hispánicos, HCAYS headquarters, is located within the "Ciudad Universitaria" of Madrid, next to the Complutense University and the University of San Pablo, an HCAYS affiliate (students may opt to take one course at the University of San Pablo). Language and civilization classes form part of the fall orientation program in Galicia, while a similar orientation for spring students takes place in Andalucía. Frequent group excursions throughout Spain complement the rich academic and social opportunities offered to students in Madrid. The program is open to sophomores, juniors and first-semester seniors. Although the program is designed for a full-year, application may be made for either the fall or spring sessions. To be eligible, students must normally have completed at least one 200-level Hispanic studies course and have a strong academic average.

110F First-Term Spanish.
Intended for beginners. Thorough grounding in aural comprehension, speaking, reading and writing. Interactive study of Spanish grammar with strong emphasis on oral and written production. First-year students who follow the sequence through 140 may qualify for study abroad. This course is offered onlyin the fall. (Proseminar.) Four hours of class, with additional TA session and laboratory work. Taught in Spanish. Maximum enrollment, 16. María Gabriela Portal.

More information ...

115F Spanish Immersion I.
Designed for exceptionally motivated beginning students who wish to accelerate their acquisition of Spanish. Intensive and interactive study of all of the basic grammatical structures of Spanish, with particular emphasis on writing and speaking. Successful completion will place students into 130 or 135. Students who follow the sequence through 135 may qualify for study abroad in one year. This course is only offered in the fall. (Proseminar.) Two course credits. Three 50-minute and two 75-minute classes a week, plus an additional three hours of laboratory work and TA session. Taught in Spanish. Maximum enrollment, 16. TBA.

More information ...

120S Second-Term Spanish.
Continuing interactive study of Spanish grammatical and lexical structures begun in 110, with special emphasis on speaking and writing. Four hours of class, with additional TA session and laboratory work. Taught in Spanish. This course is offered only in the spring. (Proseminar.) Prerequisite, 110 or placement. Maximum enrollment, 16. The Department.

More information ...

130F,S Third-Term Spanish.
Intensive review of grammar and syntax at the intermediate level, with key emphasis on writing and speaking. Selected readings and in-class activities form the basis for further work in all the language skills. Four hours of class with additional laboratory work and TA session. Taught in Spanish. (Proseminar.) Prerequisite, 115, 120 or placement. Maximum enrollment, 16. The Department.

More information ...

135S Spanish Immersion II.
Designed for exceptionally motivated intermediate students who wish to accelerate their acquisition of Spanish. Continuation of Spanish 115. Intensive training in grammar and syntax with special interactive emphasis on speaking, writing and reading. A thorough review of grammar at the intermediate level is followed by cultural readings and small group activities similar to those of 140. Successful completion will place students into 200. Two course credits. Three 50-minute and two 75-minute classes a week, plus an additional three hours of laboratory work and TA session. Taught in Spanish. This course is only offered in the spring. Prerequisite, 115, 120 or placement. The Department.

140F,S Conversation on Hispanic Cultures.
Intense focus on speech emergence and oral presentation. Study of diverse cultural readings and other aesthetic productions as a basis for refinement of grammar comprehension and as a means to further improve writing, reading and listening skills. Three hours of class, with additional activities, TA sessions and laboratory work. Taught in Spanish. (Proseminar.) Prerequisite, grade of C or better in 130, placement or consent of instructor. Maximum enrollment, 16. The Department.

More information ...

200F,S Exploring Hispanic Texts.
Study of interdisciplinary cultural discourses — art, music, journalism, literature, film — from Latin America, Spain and the Spanish Caribbean. Focus on written and oral argumentation; introduction to the interpretation of literary texts. Advanced grammar in context and vocabulary building. Course emphasizes writing, oral presentation and the refinement of speech and pronunciation. (Writing-intensive.) (Proseminar.) Prerequisite, Grade of C+ or better in HSPST 135 or 140, placement or consent of instructor. Not open to students who have taken 201 or to senior concentrators. Taught in Spanish. Maximum enrollment, 16. TBA.

201F Spanish for Heritage/Bilingual Speakers.
Integrated review of the grammatical structure of Spanish for bilingual students, with intense emphasis on writing. Major emphasis placed on anthropolitical linguistics; special focus on political and cultural history of U.S. Latinos/as: issues of immigration, bilingualism, English-Only. Interdisciplinary readings by Latin American, Caribbean and U.S. Latino/a authors, as well as interdisciplinary film. Group activism project targets Latino communities in Utica and surrounding areas. Intense interaction focused on discussion and oral and written argumentation. (Writing-intensive.) (Proseminar.) Prerequisite, Only for Heritage Speakers, placement exam or consent of instructor. Not open to senior concentrators. Maximum enrollment, 16. C Fernandez.

[207S] Creative Reading and Writing.
A study of poetry and a workshop examining the works of Spanish-speaking poets of the 20th and 21st century, focusing on experimental poetry. Once familiar with different styles and techniques, we will begin an autobiographical poetry project: images, recording oral poetry and writing. The final project consists of a poetry booklet and a public reading/spoken word session. Prerequisite, 200 or 201 or consent of instructor. Not open to senior concentrators. Taught in Spanish.

210S Introductory Study of Spanish Literature.
Intensive study and analysis of cultural concepts and selected literary works of Spain. Introduction to basic critical skills for literary and cultural analysis as applied to texts studied. Emphasis on oral performance, student participation and on original application of critical methodology in writing projects. Prerequisite, 200 or 201 or consent of instructor. Taught in Spanish. Enrollment priority will be given to concentrators. Not open to senior concentrators.

211F Introductory Study of Latin American Literature.
A selected overview of cultural concepts and literary movements and genres in Latin American literatures. Special emphasis on representative works of selected historical periods. Introduction to basic critical skills for literary and cultural analysis as applied to texts studied. Emphasis on oral performance, student participation and original application of critical methodology in writing projects. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite, 200, 201 or consent of instructor. Not open to senior concentrators. Jessica Burke.

[212] Narrating Medieval Iberia.
Samples popular short-narrative genres (ballads, legends, exemplary stories) and their recurring themes in Medieval Spain. We will explore the rich variety of sources (oral, literary) and traditions (classical, Islamic, Christian, Jewish) in order to gain a multifaceted view of this complex and fascinating period in Spain’s history. Readings include romances, Hispano-Arabic and Hispano-Hebrew poems, excerpts from the great framed-narrative collections (El conde Lucanor, among others) and the Libro de buen amor, as well as popular stories of heroes and saints, and travelogues. Prerequisite, 210 or 211 or consent of instructor. Taught in Spanish.

213F Ficciones del delito.
Analysis of the representations in Latin American fiction of such issues as delinquency, murder, marks of difference, language and social justice, and the critical perspectives which these phenomena engender. Works by Arlt, Borges, Puig, and others. Prerequisite, 210 or 211, or consent of instructor. Not open to senior majors. Prerequisite, HSPST 210 or 211. Cecilia Hwangpo.

217S Introduction to US Latino/a Literatures.
Examination of cultural production of representative U.S. Latino/a writers, filmmakers and visual artists from the civil rights movement to present. Focuses on the rewriting of contextual history of Latinos within the United States through interdisciplinary texts. Emphasis placed on literary, cultural and historical/political analysis, feminist criticism and anti-racist pedagogies. Prerequisite, HSPST 200. Taught in Spanish. (Same as Women's Studies 213.) Maximum enrollment, 16.

219S Advanced grammar review and practical application.
Rigorous review of Spanish grammar at the very highest level, including study of the more complex structures relating to the use of the subjunctive, the passive voice and reflexives, the preterite and imperfect tenses, expressions of probability, and the expansion of expository vocabulary. Considerable effort will be devoted to the development of a mature style of writing, but emphasis will be placed on the learning and oral practice of grammatical structures. Especially recommended for Spanish majors or minors in their sophomore year, those planning to study abroad or future teachers of Spanish Prerequisite, 200, 201 or consent of instructor. Taught in Spanish. Maximum enrollment, 20. Maria Willstedt.

More information ...

[223F] Introduction to Hispanic Cinema.
An introduction to film in the Hispanic world, exploring the development of different national traditions within Latin American and Spanish Cinema. At the same time, covers some of the basic tools for interpreting and writing about film. Editing, sound, cinematography and mise-an-scène are some of the key terms and concepts studied in order to understand how viewers and filmmakers create meaning in films. Particular attention to the interrelation of cinema and culture, and the intersection of aesthetics and politics. Prerequisite, 210 or 211. Taught in Spanish.

[224S] Women in Spanish Literature and Film:"Chicas de película".
With an emphasis in the last two decades, this class will focus on literary and visual constructions of women in Contemporary Spain. Movies, poems and short stories will help us ask questions and explore ideas concerning Spanish women and society such as war and gender violence, immigration, sexualities, citizenship, interpersonal relationships, masculinities in transition, etc. Films and literary texts by Bigas Luna, Isabel Coixet, Icíar Bollaín, Anna Rossetti and Carme Riera, among others. Prerequisite, 200 or 201 or consent of instructor. Taught in Spanish.

[229] Spanish for the Professions.
Study of the vocabulary, expressions and functional use of Spanish in professional contexts. Fields covered will be medicine, business, law and social services, among others. This is an ideal course for students who wish to continue using Spanish in their career or simply want to expand their vocabulary base. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite, 200, 201 or consent of the instructor.

250F Journey into Spanish Cultures.
A study of the cultures of Spain, including history, music, painting and other aspects of Spanish civilization which reflect or have contributed to the development of modern Spanish perspectives. Emphasis on contemporary social and political events. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite, 200, 201 or consent of instructor. Not open to senior majors. Tubau.

[251S] Cultural Studies in Latin America.
Analysis of Latin American cultural history of the 19th and 20th centuries. Study of interdisciplinary cultural texts — maps, films, journalism, popular magazines and music — that represent relevant moments in or challenges to the consolidation of political and cultural identities. Particular attention paid to the figures and voices of criollos, indios, negros and sexual minorities. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite, 200, 201 or consent of instructor.

257S The World of Spanish Art: From the Alhambra to Guernica.
Intensive study of the artistic production of Spain, as reflected in the most significant expressions of architecture, painting and sculpture, along with the cultural and historical context in which these works were created. To be included, among others: Moorish, Romanesque, Gothic, Renaissance, Baroque, Neoclassic and Modernist styles (in architecture); El Greco, Velázquez, Zurbarán, Ribera, Murillo, Goya, Sorolla, Picasso and Dalí (in painting); and Vasco de la Zarza, Bigarny, Diego de Siloé, Juni, Montanás, Cano, Mena, Berruguete (in sculpture). Prerequisite, 200, 201 or consent of instructor. Taught in English (Spring 2015). (Same as Art History 257.) Medina, J.

259S Second/Foreign Language Development and Learning Strategies.
The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the findings on second/foreign language development and learning strategies over the last 4 decades. Students will read about and discuss the key issues in second/foreign language acquisition process, different acquisition models, and learning strategies involved in the different stages of second language development. Students will also learn to carry out interlanguage data collection, 4 types of data analysis (contrastive, error, performance, and discourse analyses) used in the second language acquisition field. Taught in English (Same as East Asian Languages and Literatures 259 and Education Studies 259.) Hong Gang Jin.

[261] Writing, Self and Nation in Latin America.
Study of the relationships between literature and society during the 19th and 20th centuries in Latin America. Different instances in the articulation of national identity and struggle for cultural independence will be considered through the reading of pertinent texts. Particular emphasis on salient political ideas ingrained in literary narratives. Among authors studied are Jorge Isaacs, Clorinda Matto de Turner, José Asunción Silva, Mariano Azuela, Mayra Santos-Febres, Alberto Fuguet and María Luisa Bombal. Prerequisite, 210, 211 or consent of instructor. Taught in Spanish.

[263] 1968: Massacre in Tlatelolco, Mexico City.
On the night of Oct. 2, 1968, a student demonstration ended in a massacre of hundreds in the Plaza de Tres Culturas in Tlatelolco, Mexico City. A shocked nation watched as the government claimed that extremists and Communist agitators had provoked the violence, while witnesses declared that the demonstrators were unarmed. Various reporters, scholars, historians and writers have attempted to explain the events of Tlatelolco. Considers the effect of this monumental event on Mexican society as represented through the press, Mexican literature, art and film. Prerequisite, 200 or consent of instructor. Taught in Spanish.

[269] The Art of Translation.
A study of translation theory and its applications in Spanish to English and English to Spanish. Includes a comparative study of the grammatical structure of both languages, terminology building and ample practice with translations in various fields. (Writing-intensive.) Prerequisite, 200, 201 or consent of instructor. Taught in Spanish. Maximum enrollment, 20.

[270] Special Topics in Spanish Literature and Culture.
Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite, 210, 211 or consent of instructor. Normally not open to senior concentrators.

[271] Special Topics in Latin American Literature and Culture Envisioning the Real: Fantasy, Fact and Fiction in Latin American Literature.
This course studies various literary representations of “reality” in Latin American texts from the colonial period to the present day. Special attention is given to the representation of history and truth in texts that explore the concept of identity on both the individual and national level. Taught in Spanish. Pre-requisite HSPST 210 or HSPST 211 or consent of professor. Prerequisite, 210, 211 or consent of instructor. Taught in Spanish.

[281] Introduction to Latin American Short Fiction.
Critical reading and interdisciplinary discussion of selected Latin American short fiction. Designed to familiarize students with the poetics of the Latin American short story and its relationship to pertinent literary movements. An intercultural examination of the artistic components of various Latin American short stories within their socio-historical contexts. Readings will include works by Borges, Quiroga, Cortázar, Rulfo, Valenzuela, Castellanos, García Márquez and others. Prerequisite, 210 or 211 or consent of instructor. Taught in Spanish.

283S Understanding the Contemporary Hispanic Caribbean World.
In each of the three Hispanophone Caribbean islands toward the mid-twentieth century, extremely different political fall-outs produced a corpus of texts distinct from that of their predecessors. The Cuban Revolution, the death of the Dominican dictator Trujillo, and Puerto Rico’s new political status as a U.S Commonwealth, all spurred a reconsideration of literature and other media as a socio-political space in which to articulate new notions of cultural identity. This course, through poetry, film, music and narrative, will examine the cultural shifts and their aesthetic correlates arising from these fracturing yet foundational historical events. (Writing-intensive.) (Proseminar.) Prerequisite, HSPST 200. Maximum enrollment, 16. Rodríguez-Plate.

[285] The Hispanic Transatlantic.
Exploration of cultural interactions between Spain and Latin America, and among Spain, Latin America and the U.S., in literature, music, film and popular culture from the early modern period to the present. Topics include imperialism; the relationships between modernity and colonialism; diasporas; contact zones; transculturation; rearticulation of transnational identities; coexistence in difference; borderlands; mestizo cultural spaces; cultures of resistance. Authors include Guamán Poma, "Clarín," Rosalía de Castro, García Lorca, Vallejo, Guillén, Anzaldúa, Ramos Otero, Manu Chao. Prerequisite, 210, 211 or consent of instructor. Taught in Spanish.

[290S] Recovering a Lost Memory: Cultural Representations of the Spanish Civil War and its Aftermath.
The Spanish Civil War and its aftermath shaped 20th-century Spain. This course centers on a selection of novels and films which reconstruct, evoke and explore this traumatic event and its consequences in different ways. We will also explore current efforts in Spain to recover what is referred to as an “historical memory” (“memoria histórica”) of both the war and the Franco dictatorship which followed it. Issues of trauma, exile, memory, identity and gender will be studied. Works by Martín Gaite, Matute, Rodoreda and Chacón among others. Prerequisite, 210 or 211 or consent of instructor.

[300] Medieval Spanish Literature.
An in-depth view of the beginning and early development of Spanish literature, emphasizing key works that serve as precursors to later Spanish and Latin American literatures, including Jarchas, El Poema de Mió Cid, Auto de los Reyes Magos, El Conde Lucanor, Libro de Buen Amor, poetry of the Romancero, Coplas por la muerte de su padre, Cárcel de Amor and La Celestina. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite, two 200-level courses in Hispanic studies above 200 or 201, including 210 or 211 or consent of instructor.

301/401S Modernismo.
Contextualized study of the Latin American and Spanish literary movement that broke away from the naturalist tradition and anticipated the avant-garde. Analysis of innovative literary premises in essay, prose fiction, chronicle, theatre and poetry through focus on the new consciousness of the “modernista” writer’s role in turn-of-the-century society. Examination of related notions of exoticism and escapism in the context of continental modernization. Prerequisite, Taught in Spanish. two 200-level courses in Hispanic studies above 200 or 201, including 210, 211 or consent of instructor. Senior concentrators who plan to write their senior research project in this course must take it as 401. Maximum enrollment, 16. M Cecilia Hwangpo.

303/403S Representing Gender in Latin America.
Approaches gender studies through critical analysis of Latin American literature, film and social movements. We study representations of femininity and masculinity in Latin American culture and their historical roots, considering traditional gender roles and more contemporary attempts to break with social expectations linked to sex and gender, as well as the complex interactions of gender with nationality, class and sexual orientation. Discussions center in issues of representation, identity and “equality.” Readings include both literary texts as well as gender theory. Prerequisite, Two 200-level courses in Hispanic studies above 200 or 201, or consent of instructor. Taught in Spanish. (Same as Women's Studies 303/403.) Maximum enrollment, 16. Burke.

[306] Literary Masterpieces of the Spanish Golden Age.
Detailed analysis of the most notable dramatic, poetic, and narrative creations of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries in Spain. Works studied will include the anonymous precursor of the picaresque mode, novelas ejemplares of Cervantes, plays of Lope de Vega, Tirso de Molina and Calderón, ands poetry of Garcilaso, Fray Luis de León, San Juan de la Cruz, Quevedo and Góngora. Prerequisite, 210 or 211 or consent of instructor. Taught in Spanish.

[313F] The Latin American Dictator Novel.
An exploration of the formation and evolution of Latin American novels of dictatorship from the mid-nineteenth to the late twentieth century. Themes include the relationship between power and writing, allegories of authority, and textual methods of resistance. Readings include Sarmiento, Asturias, Roa Bastos, García Márquez and Vargas Llosa. Prerequisite, 210 or 211 or consent of instructor. Taught in Spanish.

[314] 20th-21st Century Spanish Narrative: How do we learn from Literature and/or History?.
The class studies novels written in Spain throughout the 20th and 21st centuries, but mostly in the last 50 years. All of them could be considered exemplary for varied reasons and all are key sources for understanding contemporary peninsular literature. We will discuss critical and theoretical essays and articles related to our novels and around the question, common to all of them, of how literature and history help us to learn. Works by Rosa Chacel, Torrente Ballester, Delibes, Lourdes Ortiz and Ruiz Zafón among others. Prerequisite, Two 200-level courses in Hispanic studies above 200 or 201 including 210 or 211 or consent of instructor. Taught in Spanish.

[319] Latin American Dialectology.
A study of the major dialects of Latin America, including their origins, development and geographical extension. Students will learn the basics of dialectology, sociolinguistics and phonetic transcription while increasing their general knowledge of Spanish. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite, two 200-level courses in Hispanic Studies above 200 or 201 or consent of instructor.

[322] Gender and Writing in Spain.
The course will focus on the analysis of literary texts written by contemporary Spanish women writers, mostly from the 60's to the present. Some attention will be paid to older texts, which are part of the recuperation of historic memory, and to religious-cultural icons to which women writers respond. Movies, theoretical and legal texts and documentaries will also be an important part of the course. The course will analyze the way these texts question rigid gender structures as they confront, dissolve, re-write a constructed androcentric reality and create a more welcoming society for all. Prerequisite, Two 200-level courses in Hispanic studies above 200 or 201 including 210 or 211 or consent of instructor. Taught in Spanish.

[323] The Power of Looking: Re-imagining the Nation in Hispanic Films.
An in-depth study of the history and poetics of Hispanic films from the double perspective of Hispanic cultural contexts and the development of cinema as artistic expression. Examines how props, lighting, acting, editing, etc. say more than the words in the script. We will discuss how all these elements reflect the cultural visions and beliefs of different Hispanic filmmakers and the times and places they came from. The readings will focus on film theory and film history within the context of nationalism in the Hispanic World. Prerequisite, two 200-level courses in Hispanic studies above 200 or 201, or consent of instructor. Taught in Spanish.

[329] History of the Spanish Language.
A study of the historical development of the Spanish language from its origins in Latin to the present day. Covers changes in sounds, word formation, grammatical structure and vocabulary, and their manifestation in Old Spanish texts. Students who enroll in this course should have an interest in analyzing the structure of the language. No familiarity with Latin is required. Prerequisite, two 200-level courses in Hispanic studies above 200 or 201 or consent of instructor. Taught in Spanish. Fulfills the pre-1800 requirement for the Spanish concentration.

330/430S Early Modern Spanish Drama: Aesthetics, Ideology and Society.
The 17th century produced some of the most important, influential and interesting works in the history of Spanish theater. Through a detailed analysis of key dramas of the Early Modern period we focus on the emergence and development of theater in Spain, as well as the study of its different subgenres. Pays close attention to the aesthetics of representation as well as sociopolitical and ideological questions. Works by Cervantes, Tirso de Molina, Lope de Vega, Calderón de la Barca and Juana Inés de la Cruz. Prerequisite, two 200-level courses in Hispanic studies above 200 or 201, or consent of instructor. Maximum enrollment, 16. Xavier Tubau.

More information ...

[333] Latin American Theatre.
Analysis and discussion of 20th century plays in light of major theatrical movements such as the Theater of the Absurd, the Epic Theater, Metatheater and the Theater of Cruelty. Examination of construction and critiques of self, power, society and political identities. Readings from such leading playwrights as Usigli, Marqués, Gambaro, Wolff, Carballido and Cossa. Prerequisite, Two 200-level courses in Spanish above 200 or 201 including 210 or 211 or consent of instructor. Taught in Spanish. Maximum enrollment, 16.

[340] Twentieth-Century Spanish Theatre.
Study of the development of the theatre in Spain as a reflection of the artistic, social and historical turmoil that led to the Spanish Civil War, Franco and the present democratic monarchy. Emphasis on critical reading and discussion of works by such authors as Ortega y Gasset, Benavente, Grau Valle-Inclan, Garcia Lorca, Buero Vallejo, Sastre, Arrabal, Muniz, Ruibal, Fernan Gomez, Martinez Ballesteros and Paloma Pedrero. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite, two 200-level courses in Hispanic studies above 200 or 201 or consent of instructor.

[341/441] Memory, History and Fiction: Postdictatorship’s Narratives in Latin American Southern Cone.
After dictatorships, transitions to democracy tend to be based on collective “pactos de olvido." In these cases, literature, cinema and other “fictions” become places where memory can be constructed, unsettling current dominant historical discourses. This course explores the representation of historical truth when the past is related to traumatic events, as in Uruguay, Argentina and Chile in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Authors include Juan Gelman, Julio Cortázar, Cristina Peri Rossi, among others. Films from aforementioned countries will also be studied. Prerequisite, two 200-level courses in Hispanic studies above 200 or 201, or consent of instructor.

343/443F Contemporary Latin American Novel.
Critical reading of representative Latin American novels from the "Boom" to the present. Authors include Fuentes, García Márquez, Donoso, Puig, Ferré and Boullosa. Prerequisite, Two 200-level courses in Hispanic studies above 200 or 201 including 210 or 211 or consent of instructor. Taught in Spanish. Maximum enrollment, 16. Burke.

[345] The Female Autograph: Women’s Writing in the Hispanic World.
Cross-cultural study of women’s literary texts in Spain, Latin America and the United States. Textual analysis grounded in feminist literary, social theories and critical frameworks; particular attention paid to women’s agency and writing as transgressions in patriarchal symbolic order, to the consideration of a generolecto (women’s specific literary inscription) and to theoretical and critical approaches to gender and writing. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite, two 200-level courses in Hispanic studies above 200 or 201 including 210 or 211 or consent of instructor. (Same as Women's Studies 345 .)

[353/453] The Detective Story in Latin America.
An exploration of the detective story in Latin America. While the detective story attained its iconic status with the Sherlock Holmes capers by Arthur Conan Doyle in the late 19th century, the genre has been popular and prolific in Latin America for all of the 20th century. We will examine the conventions and traditions of the whodunit as well as the ways in which Latin American detective fiction departs from those norms. Readings by Jorge Luis Borges, Mario Vargas Llosa, Gabriel García Márquez and Roberto Bolaño, among others. Prerequisite, 210 or 211 or consent of instructor. Taught in Spanish.

[360] The Generations of 1898 and 1927.
This course will be a study of the ideas, trends and new concepts of Spanish literature at the end of the 19th century and beginning of the 20th century, spurred on by historical challenges (loss of Empire) and social unrest (political upheaval) in Spain. José Ortega y Gasset’s La deshumanización del arte will serve as a theoretical bridge between the two generations. We will also question the validity of these categories and problematize the anointing of literary generations. (Proseminar.) Prerequisite, two 200-level courses in Hispanic studies above 200 or 201, or consent of instructor. Maximum enrollment, 16.

[362/462S] Literature on Film.
This course will focus on the film adaptations made of Spanish plays and novels and on the texts that originated them. How does verbal translate into visual? How does film narrate or dramatize differently (if so) than literature? Readings will include contemporary as well as classical literary works and the viewing and analysis of their film adaptations: Lope de Vega, García Morales, Manuel Rivas, Fernando Aramburu among others, and movies by Pilar Miró, Erice, Cuerda, Viscarret, and Uribe. Prerequisite, Two 200-level courses in Hispanic studies above 200 or 201 including 210 or 211 or consent of instructor. Taught in Spanish.

[365/465] Transatlantic Cinema.
An interdisciplinary and intercultural examination of the artistic components of various Latin American, Latino and Spanish films within their socio-historical contexts. Films include: Los Olvidados (México 1950); La boca del lobo (Perú); Frida, naturaleza viva (México); Yo, la peor de todas and Bolivia (Argentina); A hora da estrella (Brasil); Mechuca (Chile); Guantanamera (Cuba); El espíritu de la colmena and ¿Qué he hecho yo para merecer esto? (España); La pelota vasca: La piel contra la piedra (Euskadi); And the Earth did not Swallow Him (EEUU). Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite, two 200-level courses in Hispanic studies above 200 or 201, or consent of instructor. Senior concentrators who plan to write their senior research project in this course must take it as 465.

370/470S Postmodern Spain: New Narratives and New Technologies.
Multiple electronic media keep us informed and connected, and in so doing have dramatically altered contemporary social life. In this course we will analyze recent Spanish writings on New Media (social media, YouTube). Focusing on new trends in electronic writing, mixed media, and blogs, class assignments will include online literary journals as well as e-books and other New Media productions. Prerequisite, 210, 211 or consent of instructor. Maximum enrollment, 16. Norberg.

[371] Special Topics in Latin American Literature: Latin American History through Cinema.
The course introduces important Latin American films and documentaries, through which it analyzes significant aspects of political and aesthetic tensions that have characterized the region. Both films and documentaries will be analyzed as artistic endeavors and as sociological documents that provide a window into the socio-historical context of the nation in question. Weekly screenings of films and clips by Tomás Gutiérrez Alea, Alejandro Jodorowsky, Raymundo Gleyzer, Eduardo Coutinho, María Luisa Bemberg, Lita Stantic, Andrés Wood, Paulo Caldas, and Albertina Carri, among others. Prerequisite, 210 or 211 or consent of instructor. Taught in Spanish.

[377] Latino/a Experiences in the United States.
Rigorous examination and historico-political analisis of U.S. Latina literary production and poetics with focus on short story and drama (including performance art). Examination of construction and critiques of self, gender, society and political and sexual identities. Course analysis framed by feminists literary theories and criticism, and anti-racist pedagogy. Authors will include Ana Castillo, Sandra Cisneros, Cherríe Moraga, M. H. Viramontes, Nicolasa Mohr, Migdalia Cruz, Marga Gómez. Prerequisite, two 200-level courses in literature or consent of instructor. No knowledge of Spanish required. Taught in English. (Same as Women's Studies 379.)

380/480F Cervantes' Don Quijote.
Careful analysis of the style, characterization, theme and structure of Spain’s greatest literary masterpiece, and the study of the work’s relationship to the major social and intellectual currents of the 17th century. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite, two 200-level courses in Hispanic studies above 200 or 201 including 210 or 211 or consent of instructor. Maximum enrollment, 20. TBA.

[385/485] Travel and Writing in Spain and Latin America.
Analysis of travel narratives and representations of travelers as models of contact within the cultures of globalization from the early 19th to the 20th centuries. Topics include: travel as metaphor; economies of displacement and travel; identity; indianos (women) travelers and migrants as cultural agents; migration; exile; pilgrimage; diaspora cultures. Authors include Condesa de Merlín, Flora Tristán, “Clarín,” Pereda, Galdós, Martí, Carmen de Burgos, García Lorca, Mistral, Teresa de la Parra, Luis Rafael Sánchez, Manuel Ramos Otero. Prerequisite, two 200-level courses in Hispanic studies above 200 or 201 including 210 or 211 or consent of instructor. Senior concentrators who plan to write their senior research project in this course must take it as 485.

[390] Jewels of Spanish Poetry.
Close textual examination, at the most advance level, of some of the most memorable poems produced in Spain from the Renaissance to the 20th century. Offers an appreciation and enjoyment of various forms of poetic expression, along with an understanding of the literary, social and historical context that influenced their creation. Prerequisite, 200, 201 or consent of instructor. Taught in Spanish.

[391/491] Strategies of Resistance in Hispanic-Caribbean Literature: From Slavery to Racial Consciousness.
Examines the emergence of the African culture in the Hispanic-Caribbean, taking into consideration some literary texts from the 19th and 20th centuries. We will study how the voice of the margins has been excluded or included, and consciously manipulated. We will analyze the concept of "race" and its intricate relations with issues of gender, class and cultural politics. Some of the problems to be considered are: the anthropological representation of the Other, the object/subject of slavery, racial stereotyping and oppression, religion, sexuality and interracial love. Prerequisite, 210, 211 or consent of instructor. Taught in Spanish.

400F Senior Seminar Topic for 2014-2015: El Cid Campeador.
The Making of a National Hero: El Cid Campeador What are the essential attributes of a hero? And why does a nation need one? Rodrigo Díaz de Vivar (a.k.a. El Cid) has traditionally been considered Spain’s national hero. A controversial figure during his lifetime, his fame grew immensely in the centuries after his death in 1099 A.D. This course will explore the political and cultural processes that made it possible for an enormous and variegated textual tradition to accrue around his person and deeds, what some of its main manifestations are, and how critics and historians have interpreted them at different times. Readings will include selections from primary texts such as El Poema de Mio Cid, Christian and Muslim chronicles, ballads, plays, and movies, as well as some of the more important critical analyses by scholars like Menéndez Pidal, Colin Smith, Dozy, etc. Taught in Spanish. Open to seniors only. Required for senior concentrators who are candidates for honors and strongly recommended for all other senior concentrators. Hispanic Studies concentrators will be given preference over other seniors. Maximum enrollment, 12. Willstedt, M.

550S Honors Project.
Independent study program for students who qualify as candidates for departmental honors. Students will work closely with a thesis advisor (chosen from among the Hispanic studies faculty) who will direct and guide the preparation and oral defense of the thesis. Students will normally also choose a second reader. Students must normally have an average of at least 90 in the courses counting toward the concentration at the end of the first semester of the senior year in order to qualify. Honor concentrators must normally take the Senior Seminar (400) during the fall of their senior year. The Department.

(from the Hamilton Course Catalogue)

Cupola