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Fall 2009


Live, work and learn in one of the world's premier cities of commerce and culture. Hamilton in New York City combines an internship with academic experience and is unique in its attempt to encompass a wide range of perspectives on globalization. Here's a glimpse: The expertise of recent program directors includes sociology, administrative law and government, cultural diversity and national pluralism, international law and politics, theatre, literature and film, and international finance.

International Political Economy

Director: Alan Cafruny, Henry Platt Bristol Professor of International Affairs, Dept. of Government (acafruny@hamilton.edu)

Prerequisite: Government 114 or consent of instructor

College 398 Global Processes: International Political Economy

Foundational course in the Program in New York City. This course introduces the main theoretical approaches and basic issues in the study of contemporary globalization. Topics include the rise, and fall of the Bretton Woods system; exploration of the role of basic international economic organizations (IMF, World Bank, WTO), the development and significance of global neoliberalism; the political economy of energy, the development of the U.S. military industrial complex; the political economy of work; underdevelopment and poverty; challenges from Asia and the European Union.

As the site of the United Nations and related international organizations New York City plays a central role in international politics. Notwithstanding the recent travails of the U.S. imperium international financial relations continue to reflect the power of the "Dollar Wall Street complex." Internships, field trips, and lectures enable students to gain first-hand knowledge of the problems and prospects for contemporary globalization.


College 396 Independent Study

A tutorial resulting in a substantial paper (30 pp) that integrates experience and learning from the internship with an academic perspective and knowledge gained in the seminars or other tutorial readings.


College 397 Internship

Work experience during four days a week that includes a journal or written account of that experience.


College 395 Issues in US Foreign Policy

This course is oriented around ten debates in US Foreign Policy: the Iraq War, immigration policy, global financial shifts, globalization and poverty, humanitarian intervention, dollar-euro rivalry, US-Iran conflict, US-China relations, and US-Russia relations. Approved for credit in Government.

Contact Information


Karen Prentice-Duprey

(on behalf of the Program Administrator and Directors)
315-859-4634 315-859-4077 kprentic@hamilton.edu
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