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College Catalogue

Music

Faculty

G. Roberts Kolb, Chair
Lydia R. Hamessley
Heather R. Buchman
Robert G. Hopkins
Samuel F. Pellman
Michael E. Woods (S)

Special Appointments
Rick Balestra
Suzanne Beevers
Stephen Best
Paul Charbonneau
Jon R. Garland
Linda Greene
Eric Gustafson
Nancy James
Jim Johns
Lauralyn Kolb
Allan Kolsky
Ursula Kwasnicka
Daniel MacCollum
Rick Montalbano
Colleen R. Pellman
Darryl Pugh
Gregory Quick
John Raschella
Monk Rowe
Patricia Sharpe
Jesse Sprole
Jeff Stockham
Sar-Shalom Strong
Ubaldo Valli
Jon Fredric West

A concentration in music comprises 11 courses: 209, 251, 252, 253, 254 or 259, 280 and 281 (half-credit courses), 309, 350, 351, the Senior Project (452), and one course credit in performance (from among courses in solo performance and/or group performance). A more complete description of the Senior Project is available from the department. Prerequisite for 209: 109 or placement through department placement exam; prerequisites for 280 and 281: 180 and 181 respectively. Concentrators are also expected to participate in department ensembles in each semester. Students contemplating graduate work in music should consult with a member of the department at an early date. Department honors can be earned by students who have at least a 90 average in their coursework that counts toward the concentration as well as through distinguished achievement in Mus 550-551 (Honors Senior Project I-II).

A minor in music comprises five courses: 209, two courses from among 251, 252, 253, and 254 or 259; one course credit in performance (from among courses in solo performance and/or group performance); and one other full-credit course except 109.

Music 104, 154, and 160 are open to juniors; 109 is open to both juniors and seniors. Juniors and seniors without prior courses in the department may enroll in 258 and 420.

Courses in Literature and History of Music

104F Masterpieces of Western Music.
A listening course based on the study of selected masterpieces of Western music in their historical context. Emphasis on listening skills and the evaluation of cultural and musical meanings. Includes instrumental and vocal works by Monteverdi, Handel, Mozart, Beethoven, Verdi and Stravinsky. No ability to read music is assumed or required. (Writing-intensive.) Maximum enrollment, 20. Hopkins.

[108] From Words to Song.
An exploration of the relationship between words and music — of the many and different ways in which the meanings and emotions of the words have (and have not) been expressed through music in the last millennium. (Writing-intensive.) No previous knowledge of music required. Not open to seniors. Maximum enrollment, 20.

[154] Music of the World’s Peoples.
A study of selected cultures around the world, including Native American music of North America, sub-Saharan African music, African-American music in the United States, Latin American music and the classical traditions of India, Indonesia and Japan. Consideration given to musical style and the role of music in these cultures. (Proseminar.) Not open to seniors. Maximum enrollment, 16.

160F History of Jazz.
A study of jazz from its origins (its African heritage, blues and ragtime) to 1950. A survey of jazz styles, including New Orleans and Chicago styles, boogie-woogie, swing, bebop and cool jazz. Not open to seniors. (Same as Africana Studies 160.) Woods.

245S Music in American Film.
An examination of music in American film from silent films to the present with an emphasis on the golden age of Hollywood. Topics include the development of musical conventions in film, different approaches of film composers (Steiner, Tiomkin, Rózsa, Herrmann, Newman, Bernstein, Williams), and the meanings that music brings to the films' narratives. Includes films such as Casablanca, Citizen Kane, To Kill a Mockingbird, Of Mice and Men, A Streetcar Named Desire, West Side Story, Bonnie and Clyde, American Graffiti, O Brother, Where Art Thou?, The Hours. Special attention to films of Hitchcock. Prerequisite, two courses, in any combination, in music, film, or literature. Three hours per week for film viewings in addition to class time. (Same as American Studies 245.) Hamessley.

251F Music in Europe Before 1600.
A study and analysis of major developments in style of Western music to 1600, including early music theory, the rise of notation and polyphony, the relationship between music and text, and problems of performance practice. Consideration of the influence of political, economic, technological and cultural environments upon the development of musical styles. Prerequisite, 109. Hamessley.

252S Music in Europe, 1600 to 1900.
A study and analysis of major developments in style of Western music between 1600 and 1900, including the birth and development of opera, the growth of the concerto and symphony, the proliferation of program music and consideration of the varied audiences for whom composers of the Baroque, Classical and Romantic periods were writing. Consideration of the influence of political, economic, technological and cultural environments upon the development of musical styles. (Proseminar.) Prerequisite, 109. Maximum enrollment, 16. Hopkins.

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253S Music in Europe and America Since 1900.
A study and analysis of major developments in style of Western music since 1900, in particular the dissolution of tonality in the first decades of the century, the alternatives to traditional tonality that developed subsequently and the proliferation of styles in more recent years. Consideration of the influence of political, economic, technological and cultural environments on these developments. (Writing-intensive.) (Proseminar.) Prerequisite, 109. Maximum enrollment, 16. Buchman and Pellman.

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[254F] Studies in World Music.
Examination of selected non-Western music cultures with primary emphasis on West African drumming and Javanese gamelan traditions. Focus on musical procedures as well as cultural uses of the music and corollary arts. Includes hands-on performance in the traditions studied. (Proseminar.) Prerequisite, One course in music or consent of instructor. Offered every other year. Maximum enrollment, 16.

258S Opera.
Study of literary and musical dimensions of operas by major composers from Monteverdi and Mozart to the present. Emphasis on the transformation of independent texts into librettos and the effects of music as it reflects language and dramatic action. Includes such works as Orfeo, The Marriage of Figaro, Otello, The Turn of the Screw and Candide. Prerequisite, two courses in music or two in literature, or one in each field, or consent of instructors. (Same as Comparative Literature 258.) Maximum enrollment, 24. Hamessley and P Rabinowitz.

259F Studies in Jazz.
A study of the life, times and music of selected jazz musicians from 1950 to the present. Emphasis on the range of jazz styles from that era including funky, fusion and free jazz. Prerequisite, 160 or consent of instructor. (Same as Africana Studies 259.) Woods.

[262S] African-American Popular Music.
A study of the music of selected popular African-American artists, including rhythm-and-blues artists, black gospel soloists and performers of soul music and rap music. Focus on the social issues, musical modes of expression and cultural importance of the artists. Prerequisite, one full-credit course in music. (Same as Africana Studies 262.)

420F Seminar in American Studies: American Folk Revivals.
Study of the folk revivals that marked 20th-century U.S. cultural life. Topics include African and Native-American origins, 19th-century minstrels, Stephen Foster, the Appalachian ballad collections of Cecil Sharp, the legacy of the Lomax and Seeger families, bluegrass and hillbilly music, Woody Guthrie and union songs, the freedom songs of the Civil Rights Movement, the Washington Square scene in Greenwich Village, Bob Dylan and Joan Baez. Grounded in the study of music and its circulation, examines the impact of these revivals on dance, film, literature and politics. Prerequisite, two courses in English, history or music (in any combination), or consent of instructor. (Same as American Studies 420.) Maximum enrollment, 12. Hamessley.

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Courses in Performance

125F,S Applied Music.
The study of music through lessons in voice, flute, oboe, English horn, clarinet, bassoon, saxophone, horn, trumpet, trombone, euphonium, tuba, piano, organ, harp, percussion, acoustic guitar, jazz guitar, violin, viola, 'cello and contrabass. Half-hour tutorial for one-quarter credit. Based on evaluation of Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students may repeat courses for credit in Applied Music to a maximum of four semesters of study in any given instrument with the consent of the instructor. Following successful completion of four semesters of Applied Music, the student must advance to Solo Performance for further study for credit. The Department.

126F,S Applied Music.
The study of music through lessons in voice, flute, oboe, English horn, clarinet, bassoon, saxophone, horn, trumpet, trombone, euphonium, tuba, piano, organ, harp, percussion, acoustic guitar, jazz guitar, violin, viola, 'cello and contrabass. Hour tutorial for one-half credit. Based on evaluation of Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students may repeat courses for credit in Applied Music to a maximum of four semesters of study in any given instrument with the consent of the instructor. Following successful completion of four semesters of Applied Music, the student must advance to Solo Performance for further study for credit. The Department.

141-142F,S Group Performance.
The study of music through performance in one or more of the following: Orchestra (Buchman), Brass Lab (Buchman), Woodwind Lab (Buchman), College Choir (G. Kolb), Masterworks Chorale (G. Kolb), Jazz Ensemble (Woods) and Jazz Improvisation (Woods). Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Masterworks Chorale is graded S/U and is open to seniors by audition only. Jazz Improvisation is graded S/U.). One-quarter course credit each semester. May be repeated. Students may count up to four credits from among 141, 142, 241 and 242 toward graduation. The Department.

216F Conducting.
The elements of conducting, including baton technique, aural perception, rehearsal techniques and score study (both instrumental and choral). Prerequisite, any 200-level full-credit music course. Concurrent participation in a conducted college ensemble required (Choir, Masterworks Chorale, Orchestra). Offered every other year. G Kolb.

225F,S Solo Performance.
The study of music through lessons and performance in voice, flute, oboe, English horn, clarinet, bassoon, saxophone, horn, trumpet, trombone, euphonium, tuba, piano, organ, harp, percussion, acoustic guitar, jazz guitar, violin, viola, 'cello and contrabass. Half-hour tutorial for one-half credit. Students must participate in at least one public performance per semester as specified in the Music Department Handbook. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Successful completion of, or placement out of, Music 109 must occur within three semesters of Solo Performance study. May be repeated for credit. A fee is charged. The Department.

226F,S Solo Performance.
The study of music through lessons and performance in voice, flute, oboe, English horn, clarinet, bassoon, saxophone, horn, trumpet, trombone, euphonium, tuba, piano, organ, harp, percussion, acoustic guitar, jazz guitar, violin, viola, 'cello and contrabass. Hour tutorial for one-half credit. Students must participate in at least one public performance per semester as specified in the Music Department Handbook. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Successful completion of, or placement out of, Music 109 must occur within three semesters of Solo Performance study. May be repeated for credit. A fee is charged. The Department.

241-242F,S Advanced Group Performance.
The study of music through chamber performance in one or more of the following: Instrumental Chamber Ensembles (Buchman), College Hill Singers (G. Kolb), Jazz Combo (Woods). Co-requisite, concurrent registration in the corresponding Group Performance ensemble required; i.e., Orchestra, College Choir or Jazz Ensemble respectively, and consent of instructor. One-quarter course credit each semester. May be repeated. Students may count up to four credits from among 141, 142, 241 and 242 toward graduation. The Department.

326F,S Advanced Solo Performance.
The study of music through lessons and performance in voice, flute, oboe, English horn, clarinet, bassoon, saxophone, horn, trumpet, trombone, euphonium, tuba, piano, organ, harp, percussion, acoustic guitar, jazz guitar, violin, viola, 'cello and contrabass. Hour tutorial for one-half credit required for and open only to students who are preparing half or full recitals approved by the Music Department. Prerequisite, successful completion of at least two semesters of Solo Performance, 109 and consent of instructor. Students may only enroll in Advanced Solo Performance upon completion of or co-registration in 209 or one course in literature and history of music at the 200 level. May be repeated for credit. A fee is charged. The Department.

Courses in Theory and Composition

109F,S Theories of Music: Fundamentals.
Intensive training in the fundamentals of music, with an emphasis on the study of melodic structures, harmonic intervals and chords, rhythm and meter, and basic musical forms. Regular written assignments, including computer assignments aimed to develop musicianship skills. (Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning.) Prerequisite, Fall: The ability to read music in one clef. Spring: Mus 125, 126, 225, 226, 141, or 142 and ability to read music in at least one clef. May not be counted toward the minor. Hopkins (fall); Pellman (spring).

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[175F] The Physics of Musical Sound.
An exploration of the physics that underlies the production of musical sounds. Covers issues ranging from the nature of musical sound, units, some physical principles, theory of wave propagation and mode formation, physical mechanisms of how instrument families work and their implications for musical use of those families, acoustics of halls, digital simulations of musical instruments and performance spaces. Algebra will be used. Four hours of class/laboratory per week. May count toward a concentration in physics. (Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning.) (Same as Physics 175.)

180F Basic Aural Skills.
Introduction to aural understanding through sight-singing, dictation and the rudiments of music notation. Diatonic major scales and keys, diatonic intervals, diatonic melodies, tonic and dominant arpeggiation, an introduction to minor scales and keys, cadences, rhythms in simple and compound meters. One-quarter course credit. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. Prerequisite, concurrent or previous registration in 109 or consent of instructor. Hamessley.

181F,S Basic Keyboard Skills.
Introduction to keyboard skills including note identification, intervals, major and minor scales, triad identification, 7th chords, simple chord progressions and basic sight-reading. One-quarter course credit. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. Prerequisite, concurrent or previous registration in 109 or consent of instructor. Not open to seniors. Best.

209F Theories of Music: Counterpoint and Harmony.
A study of counterpoint, voice-leading, harmonic progressions and chromatic harmony. Consideration of common processes in music and how they are perceived. Concurrent registration in Keyboard Skills (181 or 281) is highly recommended for prospective music concentrators. (Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning.) Prerequisite, 109 and 180 (may be taken concurrently). Hopkins.

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[213] Jazz Arranging.
The theoretical designs used in combo, big band and third-stream writing. Coverage of jazz scales, chords, voicings, ranges and tonal properties. Students are expected to compose and copy the parts to three compositions, one of which will be read and recorded. Prerequisite, 209.

277F Music for Contemporary Media.
Experience with the aesthetics and techniques of the modern recording studio, including the uses of sound synthesizers, digital samplers and MIDI. Creative projects using these techniques. Prerequisite, ability to read music in at least one clef. Three hours of class and three hours of studio. Maximum enrollment, 14. S Pellman.

280S Intermediate Aural Skills.
A continuation of 180. Development of aural understanding through sight-singing and dictation. Tonic and dominant arpeggiation in inversion, diatonic melodies with simple modulation, further work in minor keys, introduction to alto and tenor clefs, chromatic intervals, harmonic progressions, rhythms in mixed meters, modal scales. May be repeated for credit with the consent of instructor. One-half course credit. Prerequisite, 180 and consent of instructor. Buchman.

281F,S Intermediate Keyboard Skills.
A continuation of 181. Four-part chord progression reading, alto and tenor clef, melodic transposition, introduction to figured harmony, chord progressions, intermediate sight-reading. One-half course credit. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite, 181 and consent of instructor. Best.

309S Theories of Music: Musical Forms.
Analytical techniques and analysis of common musical forms from many traditions, including European classical, popular, jazz and other music from around the world. Consideration of common structures in music and how they are perceived. Concurrent registration in Keyboard Skills (181 or 281) is highly recommended for prospective music concentrators. Prerequisite, 209 and 280 (may be taken concurrently). Hopkins.

368S Seminar in Musical Composition.
Contemporary techniques of musical composition, including notational practices and score preparation. Emphasis on developing the ability to structure musical ideas in a series of short pieces in a variety of media, culminating in the presentation of selected works in a studio recital. Prerequisite, 209. (Offered in alternate years.) Maximum enrollment, 12. S Pellman.

[369] Advanced Musical Composition.
A continuation of 368. Students work on individual projects involving more extended musical forms. One-quarter course credit. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. Prerequisite, 368. Maximum enrollment, 3.

377S Digital Arts Workshop.
Emphasis on collaborative work among computer musicians and videographers in the creation of visual/sound works. Projects will include fixed media works, installations, and/or performance art pieces. Prerequisite, Art 213 or Music 277. (Same as Art 377 .) Maximum enrollment, 16. Gant, Pellman.

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380F,S Advanced Aural Skills.
A continuation of 280. Development of aural understanding through sight-singing and dictation. More extensive modulation of melodies and harmonic progressions, aural analysis of small binary forms, further work in alto and tenor clefs. One-half course credit. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite, 280 and consent of instructor. Hamessley.

381F,S Advanced Keyboard Skills.
A continuation of 281. May include continued work in alto and tenor clef, reading open scores, more advanced figured harmony and advanced sight-reading. One-half course credit. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite, 281 and consent of instructor. Best.

Third-year Seminars and the Senior Project

350F Topics in Music.
In-depth consideration of topics in music theory, history, composition and performance. Topics for 2014: Music and Film; CSound Applications.; a Jazz Topic. (Oral Presentations.) Prerequisite, 209 and one additional full-credit music course at the 200 level. Hamessley, S Pellman, Woods.

351S Topics in Music.
In-depth consideration of topics in music theory, history, composition and performance. Topics for 2015: Orchestration and Score Study; Bernstein's Candide; and Editing Renaissance Music (Oral Presentations.) Prerequisite, 209 and one additional full-credit music course at the 200 level. Buchman, Hopkins, G Kolb.

452S Senior Project.
Supervised work on a specific topic chosen from among those offered by members of the department. Prerequisite, Music 350-351, or consent of department. Open to seniors only. The Department.

550F Honors Senior Project I.
Supervised work on a specific project based on proposal submitted to the department by the end of the student’s junior year. Prerequisite, Consent of department. One-half credit. Open to seniors only. The Department.

551S Honors Senior Project II.
Completion of senior honors project. Prerequisite, Music 550 and consent of department. One-half credit. The Department.

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