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College Catalogue

East Asian Languages and Literatures

Faculty 
De Bao Xu, Chair
Yi-Hui Chen
Hong Gang Jin
Xiaoming Hou
Masaaki Kamiya
Kyoko Omori
Ayako Tanemura
Lian Xue
Zhuoyi Wang


Special Appointments
Leanne Li
Yan Li
Shuang Wu
Yang Wu

The East Asian Languages and Literatures Department offers courses in the Chinese and Japanese languages, literatures and cultures, a Chinese concentration, a Chinese minor, a Japanese minor, and a study abroad program, Associated Colleges in China (ACC). Courses offered focus on language acquisition and introduction to the cultures and civilizations of both countries. As much as possible, the first-year courses are taught in the target languages, while the upper-level courses are conducted entirely in Chinese or Japanese. The Chinese concentration emphasizes work in the original language as key to understanding China and China-related issues aiming at and preparing students for further studies in graduate schools and professional careers in international trade, government service, diplomacy, private business, journalism and other related fields.

A concentration in Chinese consists of nine courses numbered 140 or higher, including 150, 220, a 400-level course, which should be taken before the senior year (an ACC 400 level course counts), and a course at or above the 430 level, among which 445 is required taken in each semester of the senior year, and the required senior project (550). A course concentrating on China's civilization or cultural offered by another department may satisfy the 150 requirement. Consult the Chinese Program. A minor in Chinese requires five courses numbered 140 or higher, including 150, 220 and a 400-level course.

A minor in Japanese requires five courses. Those courses include at least three language courses beyond Japanese 120 (i.e., 130, 140 and 200) and one non-language course offered by the program. The fifth course may be either a language (220 and above) or a non-language course. Consult the faculty in Japanese.

Students of Chinese and Japanese are strongly encouraged to participate in study abroad programs in China and Japan. Students of Chinese are eligible for the ACC program. Students of Japanese have the opportunity to study abroad through such programs as Kyoto Center for Japanese Language (Kyoto), CIEE-Sophia University (Tokyo) and Nanzan University (Nagoya). Consult the faculty in Japanese for details.

To obtain departmental honors, students must have an average of A- or better in all coursework in Chinese and must be a Chinese major.

Study of the Chinese and the Japanese languages (Chinese 140/Japanese 140) in the East Asian Languages and Literatures Department also satisfies the two-year language requirement of the Asian Studies Program. Students are encouraged to strengthen their understanding of cross-cultural issues by integrating their language and culture studies with courses offered in Asian studies.

Students interested in beginning or continuing their Chinese or Japanese language studies should make an immediate start with the 100- or 200-level courses or consult with the department chair. All 100-, 200- and 300-level courses taught in English are open to juniors and seniors without prerequisites.

Associated Colleges in China
Administered by the East Asian Languages and Literatures Department, the program provides summer, fall and spring study in Beijing (Capital University of Economics and Business) with intensive coursework through individualized instruction with a high level of participation and interaction. The courses are taught entirely in Chinese and encompass topics including advanced language, Chinese politics, society, economics, religion, art, folklore and literature. Unique features and activities of the program include the language pledge (speaking Chinese only), language practicum (individual projects conducted with local citizens), Chinese host families, Chinese language table, field trips in historically and culturally important sites outside of Beijing and extracurricular activities such as Taichi, Chinese food cooking, calligraphy, etc.

The courses taken with ACC will count toward the Chinese concentration requirement. However, students with concentrations other than Chinese should consult with the appropriate department for transfer of credit for the concentration.

The ACC Program is open to sophomores, juniors and first-semester seniors. It is in principle a full-year program (summer, fall and spring); however, applications may be made for any of the three sections. To be admitted, students must take at least two semesters of Chinese, a course on the culture and civilization of China and have the permission of the ACC director.

Chinese

110F First-Term Chinese.
An introduction to spoken and written modern Chinese through conversational drills, comprehension, reading and writing practice in classwork and homework. Four hours of class, with additional lab work and individual sessions for each student. Jin and Huang.

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120S Second-Term Chinese.
Continued work in speaking, listening and reading. Emphasis on patterns that facilitate speaking and reading. Four hours of class, with additional lab work and individual sessions for each student. Prerequisite, 110. The Department.

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130F Third-Term Chinese.
Comprehensive review of grammar and development of language skills through communicative teaching. Four hours of class, with additional lab work and individual sessions for each student. Prerequisite, 120 or consent of instructor. Lin.

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140S Fourth-Term Chinese.
Continuation of third-term Chinese. Development of spoken and written skills, as well as familiarity with current Chinese culture. Class discussions in Chinese. Four hours of class, with additional lab work and individual sessions for each student. Prerequisite, 130 or consent of instructor. The Department.

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150F Chinese Culture, Society and Language.
A survey of both traditional and modern Chinese cultural norms and values through the examination of the people, land, history, philosophy, politics, society, economy, customs, literature and art, and language. Lectures and discussions. Taught in English. D Xu.

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200F Advanced Chinese I.
Designed for students who wish to use Chinese beyond everyday conversation. Concentrates on subtleties of Chinese grammar and builds a vocabulary through extensive use of short texts. Includes expository writing. Four hours of class, with additional tutorial and laboratory work. Taught primarily in Chinese. Prerequisite, 140 or consent of instructor. Lin.

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[203S] Women in Chinese Literature.
Explores Chinese literature through the lens of gender, examining the ways women are represented in the Chinese literary tradition from ancient times to the present day—as trope, as voice and through their own writing in verse and prose. All readings and discussions in English.

205S Modern China Through Film.
Examines how films produced in diverse socio-economic contexts generate conflicting modern representations of China, ranging from a legendary land, an everlasting patriarchy, to a revolutionary battlefield, and how these representations produce hegemonic and subversive cultural knowledge. Students will gain a broad understanding of post-1959 Chinese cinema and history, theory of film and cultural studies, and pertinent Hollywood films. All films have English subtitles. Requirements include film viewings, presentations, quizzes, class discussions and a final paper. All lectures and discussions in English. (Same as Comparative Literature 205.) Wang.

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[210S] Modern and Contemporary Chinese Literature: Traditions and Modernities.
Since 1919, Chinese literature has played a decisive role in interactions between tradition and modernity. This course examines the development of Chinese literature against such interactions. Students will familiarize themselves with the most representative modern and contemporary Chinese literary works and gain a broad understanding of many modernity-related issues, including politics, culture, class, labor division, ethnicity, gender and sexuality. All lectures and discussions in English. Requirements: presentations, class discussions, film viewings and a final paper. (Same as Comparative Literature 210.)

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[215F] Chinese Literature in Translation.
Study and analysis of pre-modern Chinese literature in English translation. Texts will be selected from far antiquity to the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911). Lectures will introduce authors, major genres and theories in their social and historical context, while tutorials will be spent reading and discussing samples of significant texts. Students will give oral presentations and keep abreast of prescribed readings. All lectures and discussions in English. (Same as Comparative Literature 215.)

220S Advanced Chinese II.
Continuation of Advanced Chinese I, with emphasis on making the transition from textbook to an advanced level of competence for reading periodicals and journals in China. Discussion, written and oral work. Taught in Chinese. Prerequisite, 200 or consent of instructor. The Department.

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[230] Translation Workshop.
The work of literary translation is intensely intellectual and deeply creative. Focuses on the theory and practice of translation by developing practical translation skills (from any language, but especially Chinese) through translation exercises and individual projects. We will also read translation theory to better understand cross-cultural communication. No knowledge of Chinese required. (Writing-intensive.) Prerequisite, competence in any non-English language. Maximum enrollment, 20.

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259S Second/Foreign Language Development and Learning Strategies.
The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the findings on second/foreign language development and learning strategies over the last 4 decades. Students will read about and discuss the key issues in second/foreign language acquisition process, different acquisition models, and learning strategies involved in the different stages of second language development. Students will also learn to carry out interlanguage data collection, 4 types of data analysis (contrastive, error, performance, and discourse analyses) used in the second language acquisition field. Taught in English (Same as Hispanic Studies 259 and Education Studies 259.) Hong Gang Jin.

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[320S] Chinese Press and Television.
Study and analysis of selected multimedia materials from the Chinese press and television dealing with social conflicts between traditional Chinese values and Western influence, the old socialist system and new privatization, natural earthly life and modern technology. Oral presentation required; written and oral work. Taught in Chinese. Prerequisite, consent of instructor.

[360S] Readings in Modern Chinese Literature.
Study and analysis of selected modern works from 1949 to the present within the sociopolitical and intellectual context. Discussion, written and oral work. Taught in Chinese. Prerequisite, 220 or consent of instructor.

[400F] The Changing Face of China.
Study and analysis through selected journals and magazines. Students will examine aspects of the changing face of China, including in-depth coverage of population, housing and employment policies. Taught in Chinese. Prerequisite, any 300-level course in Chinese or consent of instructor.

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420S Selected Readings in China’s Post-Cultural Revolution Era.
Study and analysis of selected literary and cultural works from various schools of post-cultural revolution writers, including poetry, prose, short stories and novels from 1978 to the present. Lectures, discussions and written reports. Taught in Chinese. Prerequisite, any 300-level course in Chinese or consent of instructor. The Department.

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425F,S Current Issues in Contemporary China.
Presentation and analysis of different perspectives on 21st-century China, including geopolitical issues, economic reform, social changes, political situation and popular culture. Class materials includes documentaries, video/films, web sources and traditional texts. Short papers and oral presentation. Particularly designed for students who wish to improve their speaking and writing skills before working on their senior projects. (Writing-intensive.) Prerequisite, 220 or consent of instructor. Taught in Chinese. Huang.

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430S Masterpieces of Chinese Literature.
Reading and discussion of the masterpieces from Chinese literature including essays during the early Qin and Han dynasties, poetry and prose from the Tang and Song dynasties, the novels from the Ming and Qing dynasties. Taught in Chinese. (Writing-intensive.) Prerequisite, A 400-level course in Chinese or consent of instructor. Limited to seniors or consent of instructor. Maximum enrollment, 20. Wang.

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445F,S Classical Chinese Language and Culture.
Study and analysis of selected readings from Confucian and Taoist classics and other literary, philosophical and historical texts. Attention given to linguistic analysis and intellectual patterns and to problems of modern Chinese translation. Taught in Chinese. Prerequisite, A 400-level course in Chinese or consent of instructor. Limited to seniors or consent of instructor. Xu.

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450F Remembering the Chinese Revolution through Film.
The 20th century saw waves of revolutions shape the history of modern China. This course examines how Chinese films produced in diverse socio-economic contexts represent this century of revolution. Students will gain a broad understanding of the history of modern China, familiarize themselves with film analysis techniques and post-1949 Chinese cinema, and learn to understand film as the most powerful modern art form for constructing historical memories. Requirements for the course include group presentations, film analysis assignments, and one final paper. Taught in Chinese. (Writing-intensive.) (Oral Presentations.) Prerequisite, A 400-level course in Chinese or permission of instructor. Limited to seniors or consent of instructor. Maximum enrollment, 16. Wang.

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[465S] Chinese Education in the Age of Americanization: Crises and Reforms.
Schools in the United States have seen a rapidly increasing influx of Chinese students. In China, this trend corresponds with a growing idealization of the US educational system and dissatisfaction with the Chinese one. Yet the US system has also found itself in crisis, and turned to educational methods at the center of the Chinese system in its reforms. This course will discuss the respective strengths and weaknesses of the Chinese and the American systems, the crises they are facing, and possible directions of reforms. Presentations, weekly writing assignments, and a final paper. (Writing-intensive.) Prerequisite, a 400 level course. Limited to seniors or consent of instructor. Maximum enrollment, 20.

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[470S] History of Chinese Language.
Study and analysis of the Chinese language from Ancient Chinese (221BC), Middle Chinese (601AD), Early Mandarin (1324), to Modern Chinese (1919). Attention given to the evolution of the sound, grammar, lexicon and character system over the 2,000 years. Prerequisite, one 300-level course in Chinese or permission of instructor. Limited to seniors or consent of instructor.

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480S Globalization and China.
Examination of China’s role in globalization. Weekly classes investigate China’s global challenges through eight themes: Economic growth, human rights, intellectual property rights, environmental issues, education and career, gender issues, marriage and family, contemporary life and pop culture. Lectures, group discussions, and presentations. Taught in Chinese. Prerequisite, one 400-level course or consent of the instructor. Limited to seniors or consent of instructor. Xu.

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[490S] Advanced Readings in Chinese Literature, History and Philosophy.
Continuation of the study of Chinese literature, history and philosophy. Attention given to the in-depth reading and analysis of selected texts.Taught in Chinese. Prerequisite, 445 or consent of instructor. Limited to seniors. All others need consent of instructor.

[495S] Practicum in Chinese Language Education.
This course combines study in Chinese language and culture and experience in teaching one or two Chinese language and culture courses at K-5 programs in the Oneida-Herkimer-Madison BOCES school districts. Students in the course participate in weekly classes focusing on various aspects of Chinese language, culture, and teaching through lectures, group discussions, papers, and presentations on curriculum, instruction and assessment. Prerequisite, Consult with the instructor.

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550F,S Senior Project.
A research project using sources in Chinese culminating in a paper, designed by the student, in consultation with at least two members of the East Asian Languages and Literatures Department. Students are expected to develop analytical and linguistic skills in the Chinese language through culture study in upper-level coursework and/or study abroad. Maximum enrollment, 20. The Department.

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552S Honors Project.
Independent study programs, consisting of the separate preparation and oral defense of a paper, for students who qualify as candidates for program honors. Only students with an average of at least 88 in courses counting toward the foreign languages concentration at the end of the first semester of the senior year qualify. The Department.

Japanese

110F First-Term Japanese.
Introduction to basic structures and vocabulary. Emphasis on oral communication with practice in reading and writing, using the two syllabaries (hiragana and katakana) and 28 kanji characters. Four 50-minute classes a week (Monday-Thursday). Maximum enrollment, 15. Kamiya and Tanemura.

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120S Second-Term Japanese.
Continued work in speaking, listening, reading, and writing, with mastery of 99 kanji characters. Four 50-minute classes a week (Monday-Thursday). Prerequisite, 110, or consent of instructor. Maximum enrollment, 15. Kamiya and Tanemura.

130F Third-Term Japanese.
Completion of introduction to basic structures of the language. Continued emphasis on oral communication, with practice in reading simple texts. An additional 104 kanji characters will be introduced. Four 50-minute classes a week (Monday-Thursday). Prerequisite, 120 or consent of instructor. Tanemura.

140S Fourth-Term Japanese.
Intermediate Japanese with continued emphasis on oral communication. An additional 108 kanji characters will be introduced. Four 50-minute classes a week (Monday-Thursday). Prerequisite, 130, or consent of instructor. Tanemura.

150S Introduction to Japanese Culture and Language.
Explores contemporary Japanese culture through cultural representations and language. Designed to provide substantial knowledge on Japan and to facilitate an appreciation of the Japanese culture and related issues. Taught in English. Kamiya and Omori.

200F Advanced Japanese I.
Increasing emphasis on written Japanese, with acquisition of an additional 160 kanji characters. Prerequisite, 140, or consent of instructor. Tanemura.

[205S] Topics in Japanese Linguistics.
This course explores Japanese phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics. Students will compare Japanese with English and examine universal perspectives of language. (Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning.) Prerequisite, 110, Anthropology 201 or consent of instructor. (Same as Anthropology 205.)

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219/319F Pragmatics and Language Acquisition.
Examines interface phenomena between pragmatics and language acquisition. Students will learn theoretical issues of semantics/pragmatics and the theory of the first language acquisition. Target languages to examine various phenomena are Chinese, Japanese, Korean and English. (Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning.) (Same as Anthropology 219 and Education Studies 219.) Kamiya.

[220S] Advanced Japanese II.
Continuation of Advanced Japanese I, with guided practice in reading modern texts with acquisition of additional 250 kanji characters. Prerequisite, 200, or consent of instructor.

[227F] Gender in Japan.
This course examines gender identity and gender relations in Japanese texts from the ninth century to the present. Assignments include critiquing poems, novels, diaries, play scripts, graphic novels, and film. The course is taught in English and does not require any prior knowledge of Japanese language or history. No Pre-requisites. Open to first-year students.

230S Morphology and Syntax.
This course explores the relationship between word formation and sentence formation by examining English and Japanese grammar (and, to a certain degree, that of other languages). Ultimately, both morphology and syntax play important roles in the interpretation of sentences. No previous linguistics background or Japanese language background is necessary. (Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning.) (Same as Anthropology 230.) Masaaki Kamiya.

[235] Love, Family and Loneliness in Modern Japanese Literature.
Love has always been a central theme in Japanese literature. Focuses on how Japanese writers of the modern period (particularly late 19th century to the present) depict the struggle with new concepts and forms of "love" and relationships. As well as basic readings about modern Japanese history and culture, assigned texts range from canonical work, various forms of early twentieth-century modernist mystery, technical and avant-garde writings, to contemporary "coming of age" novels. We will also examine such media as cartoons and films. Readings and discussion in English. (Same as Comparative Literature 235.)

239/339S Modern Japan: Japanese Culture and Society From A(-Bomb) to (Dragon Ball)Z.
This course explores issues of imperialism, military conflict, pacifism, nuclear victimhood, foreign occupation, national identity, and social responsibility in 20th-century Japan. Readings include nonfiction, science fiction, poetry, war propaganda, novels and censorship documents, animé, and film. Taught in English. No knowledge of Japanese language or history required. (Same as Comparative Literature 239.)

[251] “Modern” Youth in Japanese Literature and Culture.
Examines stories and other forms of cultural expression related to the emergence of “modern” youth in Japan. We pay particular attention to the cultural, historical and political backgrounds that facilitated the establishment of such a category. Primarily focusing on literature, readings also include other modern expressive media such as film, cartoons, animation and online bulletin boards. We will also examine the production and dissemination of certain images of “youth” by mass media. Readings and discussion in English. (Same as Comparative Literature 251.)

[255] The Languages of East Asia.
Examines Chinese, Japanese and Korean as well as other languages found in East Asia. Topics include the syntactic (possible word order, inflections, particles, and combinations of all of them) and phonological structures (phoneme, pitch vs. tone, sound patterns) of these languages; the relationships of the languages to each other; differences and similarities of these languages from the universal point of view; the geographical, social and historical settings. No knowledge of any Asian language necessary. (Same as Anthropology 255.)

305S Conversation analysis: usage of structures in Japanese drama, manga and anime.
This course examines the usages of structural patterns in Japanese by focusing on actual discourses in Japanese drama, manga and anime. Students will be given hands-on practice analyzing discourses based on exchanges in these media, so that students’ oral communication skills will be improved in authentic ways. Students will also create dialogues and realize them in a 4D project. (Oral Presentations.) Prerequisite, Japanese 140 or its equivanent Japanese. course taught in English Masaaki Kamiya.

356F Introduction to Japanese Film.
Traces the history of one of the world’s most innovative film industries. Since the early 20th century, Japanese film makers have experimented with and improved upon cinema; their work has been influential not only in Japan but throughout the world. From the drama of early silent movies to anime, we’ll cover some of the “greatest hits” of Japanese film, whether widely popular or critically acclaimed. This exploration of cinema in Japan will offer both a new perspective on cinema itself as well as an opportunity to view the genre’s development in a specific cultural context. (Oral Presentations.) Prerequisite, Cinema and New Media Studies 120, Comparative Literature 120, Art History 120, any 200-level course in Asian studies or literature, or consent of the instructor. No prior knowledge of Japanese history, language or film required. Mandatory screenings on Mondays. (Same as Comparative Literature 356.) Omori.

401F Selected Readings in Japanese.
Reading in modern literary and non-literary texts and mastery of the remaining kanji characters on the joyo kanji list. Through advanced-level reading of original texts and in-depth discussion, students focus on topics such as Japanese literature, film, culture and linguistics. This course also accommodates and guides senior theses. Prerequisite, 220, or consent of instructor. Omori.

402S Japanese Textual Analysis and Translation.
Designed for students who want to achieve near-native proficiency in all four skills in Japanese language. Particular attention given to translation of literary and other texts. This course also accommodates and guides senior theses. Course conducted in Japanese. Prerequisite, 401, or consent of instructor. Omori.

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