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Chaplaincy

Monday, Fourth Week of Advent

The angel said to them, “Do not be afraid; for see—I am bringing you good news of great joy for all the people: to you is born this day in the city of David a Savior, who is the Messiah, the Lord.
—Luke 2:10-11

From “Hallmark” to Halleluiah

I love Christmas cards. My family has never been in the business of sending Christmas cards, but every December 1st or so, they start to trickle in -- cards from friends, cards from family, cards from "Mom, who is that?" — and I love to see every one of them. Some of them have long essays inside, sharing the good news of families I've never met, but most have only short, little pre-printed messages sharing the good news of a family in a stable long ago that we all know and love.

"May the joy of Christ's birth be with you and those you love this holiday season"

"May you be blessed with the peace, joy, and love that came upon us with the birth of our Lord"

"Through the ages, Christ's love shines as strong and as bright as the dazzling star on that first Christmas night."

Some people decry Christmas cards as a waste of paper and postage. Some wonder why friends they haven't talked to in years feel the need to send something at this time of year. Personally, I think it's a wonderful tradition.

All year long we are asked to share the light of Christ with everyone we meet. At Christmastime, there's a tradition of doing just that. We send little messages to those who believe and those who don't, trying to share our joy in the birth of the Savior of the WHOLE ENTIRE WORLD!!!

Each card might as well read "He was born!! Do you feel the joy that I do when you read that phrase? Oh, I wish you could. Merry Christmas!"

I hope that all of us feel and share that joy this Christmas season, and feel the love in each and every Christmas card we receive. And I hope that every little nativity or string of Christmas lights we see reminds us of our call to share the light of Christ all year long.

Because he was born. And then he lived a matchless life. And then he conquered death that we might all be resurrected.

Do you feel the joy that I do when you hear those truths?

Oh, I wish you could.

Merry Christmas,
—Sarah Kane '12