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Review and Assessment

Tenure and Promotion Guidelines

Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures

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Guidelines for Tenure

According to the Faculty Handbook, decisions regarding reappointment, promotion and tenure are based on accomplishments and promise in teaching, scholarship, and professional service. All faculty are urged to examine relevant sections of the Handbook in conjunction with these guidelines. EALL Departmental guidelines are meant to provide clarification to (1) members who will stand for reappointment, promotion, and tenure, and (2) department, deans, and outside evaluators who will evaluate members who are standing for reappointment, promotion, and tenure. Candidates should use the guidelines to help assemble their files for reappointment, promotion, and tenure; department and others should use the guidelines to assess candidacies.


Teaching

To judge a member's qualifications for reappointment, promotion and tenure, the Faculty Handbook (p. 32) identifies three criteria, which are:

  • Commitment to teaching
  • Knowledge and mastery of the discipline, and
  • The ability to communicate with, stimulate, and evaluate students

1. The Department takes commitment to teaching to mean a desire to build and develop a language program (Chinese or Japanese) and offer required language, linguistic, literature and culture courses within its discipline. A commitment to teaching includes efforts to engage and challenge students. A member's commitment to teaching is exemplified by the following:

  • Participation in curricular planning
  • Participation in team-taught language courses, individual sessions, language tables, lab work, and related activities
  • Participation in courses required for the program's concentration, including the senior project
  • Regular evaluation of pedagogy and teaching philosophy
  • New course design

2. Knowledge and mastery of the discipline(s) are demonstrated by:

  • Familiarity with the current approaches in teaching Chinese or Japanese as a second language
  • Language course content that keeps abreast of developments in linguistic theory and methodology
  • Linguistic, literary, and cultural course content (including film courses) that is closely informed by research and developments in the field
  • Course topics that are effectively contextualized within the current disciplinary debates and those of allied disciplines

3. The ability to communicate with, stimulate, and evaluate students is most directly evaluated through assessments made by students and faculty. There are several conventional forms, e.g., course evaluations, letters solicited from students, assessments following peer observations (senior faculty members will visit a candidate's class and present a written assessment to the department chair and the faculty member), and letters from faculty colleagues familiar with the candidate's teaching.

The candidate's self-evaluation should take into account the criteria outlined above. The personal evaluation should not only include a statement about his or her teaching philosophy but also provide evidence of the successful implementation of that philosophy in specific courses (e.g., teaching strategies and activities, syllabi, assignments, projects).


Scholarship

The Department expects its members to participate in significant and continuing programs of research, to be engaged in the professional discourse of their research specialties in language acquisition and pedagogy, linguistics, literature and culture, and to be committed scholars. Each member is expected to regularly share the results of a research program with colleagues in the form of peer-reviewed publications.

The Department recognizes two primary areas of research:

  • Language teaching and pedagogy (including peer-reviewed textbooks, textbook chapters, and other teaching materials, e.g., computer-software in CD-ROMs, DVDs, videotapes, and audiotapes).
  • Linguistics, literature, and culture (includes, in descending order of significance, research monographs, books, and edited books, peer-reviewed journal articles, book chapters, and short contributions, such as reviews and notes).

The Department values the content and impact of colleagues' research in their respective fields and looks for evidence of ongoing and productive engagement with the central concerns of those disciplines. Achievement is not readily measured in numbers of publications. Influential textbooks and large-scale computer software, or research monographs in a particular field, may require a long-term investment of research time and energy, and those publications should be regarded as indicating a significant achievement. Publication of an article in a top-tier (peer-reviewed) journal is important evidence of that engagement and is regarded as a high achievement for a given year. While journals differ in quality, they are often targeted to different audiences. Thus, a publication in a regional or area studies journal, for example, the Journal of the Association of Teachers of Japanese (now Japanese Language and Literature) and the Journal of Chinese Language Teachers Association, is not assumed to be less significant than one in a journal with a larger or more general readership.

Other kinds of scholarship, such as progress reports (e.g., to agency sponsors, grant reports), papers delivered at professional conferences, grant and research proposals, invited lectures, papers circulated among colleagues for review, or unpublished teaching materials, indicate progress in a faculty member's research program. They are expected to form part of a member's scholarly portfolio, but in the absence of peer-reviewed publications do not constitute an adequate record of scholarly activity.

A candidate should offer a self-evaluation of his or her scholarship using the criteria outlined above. For the purposes of evaluation, he or she should separate published from unpublished works (including ongoing projects). Published works should be listed in reverse chronological order, with clear and complete bibliographic information. Candidates should indicate whether journal articles are peer reviewed. For each published work, candidates should give a brief description of the work, its significance and its impact in its field.


Service

Service takes several forms including contributions to the department, to the College, to the community, and to one's profession. The Department expects that during a faculty member's first years at Hamilton (prior to the third-year review) the greatest effort will be devoted to course development, the refinement of teaching skills, and research and scholarship. During this time the Department encourages service on the departmental level (such as participation in departmental activities, including service as a language program coordinator), service on an interdisciplinary program if appropriate, and starting in the second year on the faculty, participation as an academic advisor.

The Department encourages, but does not require, that a member stand for election, or accept an appointment to a college committee following her or his third-year review. Contributions to the Department or interdisciplinary programs, such as serving on a hiring committee, may constitute departmental service.

Members of the Department should be mindful of the importance of service responsibilities to Hamilton's traditions of shared governance. Nonetheless, as much as the Department and College need the dedicated service of its faculty, a member's contribution to service, as indicated above, no matter how substantial, will not substitute for continuing achievement in teaching and scholarship.


Promotion to Full Professor

Teaching

Distinguished teaching, the foremost requirement for tenure, should continue to remain at a high level of effectiveness, reflecting the growing maturity and scholarly imagination necessary to challenge all types of students. The candidate's self-evaluation should be written using the same criteria and format outlined in the tenure criteria.


Scholarship

The Department takes scholarship as the foremost requirement for promotion to professor. We look for sustained professional development in research and publication, including evidence of the impact that the candidate's scholarship has made in the field. Such evidence may include:

  • Substantial articles and books
  • Editorial work with monographs, series, or journals
  • Textbook(s) or teaching software in wide use
  • Presentations and exhibitions at national and international conferences

A candidate should offer a self-evaluation of his or her scholarship using the criteria outlined above. For the purposes of evaluation, he or she should separate published from unpublished works (including ongoing projects). Published works should be listed in reverse chronological order, with clear and complete bibliographic information. Candidates should indicate whether journal articles are peer reviewed. For each published work, candidates should give a brief description of the work, its significance and its impact in its field.


Service

The Department expects service responsibilities of all continuing faculty members following tenure. A faculty member should contribute at least one significant service commitment to the College on an annual basis, such as participation on (1) a standing committee, (2) an ad hoc curricular committee, (3) a college-wide search committee, or (4) as department chair. The Department also recognizes the value of service to the profession, including officer or chair duties in professional organizations. The candidate's self-evaluation should be written using the same criteria and format outlined in the tenure criteria.

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