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Comparison of Browser Interfaces

Performing basic functions can be quite different from browser to browser. Shown below are the ways to access these functions in Mozilla's Firefox Browser, Apple's Safari Browser, Google's Chrome Browser, and Microsoft Internet Explorer. The goal of this guide is to help users utilize different browsers should the need arise. Note that the functions and user interfaces for each browser should be the same for the platforms that are available for both the Windows and OS X operating systems.

Table of Contents

Browsing

Back Button, Forward Button, and the Refresh Button
 

Firefox
 

Safari
 

Google Chrome
 

Internet Explorer
 

Creating a New Tab

Firefox
 

Safari
 

Google Chrome


Internet Explorer

Accessing Browser History

Firefox
 

Safari
To access browser history, go to the History menu and select "Show All History"
 

Chrome
To access browser history, click the Wrench icon in the upper-right-hand corner of the window and choose History.
 

Internet Explorer

Bookmarks

Adding a Bookmark

Firefox
 
Safari
To add a bookmark, click on the Bookmark menu and select Add Bookmark
 

Google Chrome
Click the Star icon located on the right side of the URL Bar
 
Internet Explorer
To add a bookmark, select Favorites > Add to Favorites

Accessing Bookmarks

Firefox
 

Safari
To access your bookmarks, click on Bookmarks and choose Show All Bookmarks

 Google Chrome
To access your bookmarks, click the icon to the right of the URL bar, select Bookmarks, then select Bookmark Manager
 

Internet Explorer

Downloads and Plug-ins

Chrome

Chrome asks for permission to invoke another tab, start a download, add a plug-in, and many other tasks that can change how the browser operates.  It disables plug-ins by default. On Hamilton-owned computers, frequently used plug-ins are set to be active by default, which will reduce how often users are prompted for consent.

Firefox

Firefox is flexible and easily allows one to download and automatically open virtually any file type (e.g. Office files, PDFs, image files, and many more.) It also enables plug-ins by default, which gives one the option of disabling plug-ins one doesn't want or need or that cause anomalous behavior. Because Firefox is the default browser on all Hamilton Macintosh Computers, a significant degree of automation has been achieved so users aren't prompted to open downloaded files, run plug-ins, etc.--things just automatically happen for them. Additionally, pop-up windows, auto-fill, and remember-password options have been disabled.


Safari

Safari is available on all Macintosh computers, Hamilton-owned or otherwise.  By default, Safari doesn't automatically open downloaded files unless they are considered "Safe" files by Apple, i.e. movies, pictures, sounds, PDF and text documents, and archives. Counter-intuitively, Office (e.g. .doc, .docx, .xls, .xlsx, .ppt, .pptx) and iWorks files are not considered "safe." (Indeed, they have been vectors for attacks on computers.) On Hamilton-owned computers, pop-up windows are blocked but no other options are preset.

 

 

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