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Kelly Fitzsimmons '10 and Visiting Assistant Professor of Biology Ashleigh Smythe
Smythe and Fitzsimmons ’10 Present at Parasitology Conference

Visiting Assistant Professor of Biology Ashleigh Smythe and Kelly Fitzsimmons ’10 recently presented papers at the Helminthological Society of Washington meeting in Washington, D.C. The Helminthological Society is the oldest parasitology society in the U.S. and this meeting coincided with the Society’s 100th anniversary.  More ...

Members of the Biology 237 class with Prof. Bill Pfitsch on Whiteface Mountain.
Ecology Class Makes Trek to Whiteface Mountain
Members of Hamilton's ecology class, Biology 237, made the annual trek to Whiteface Mountain to study responses of the vegetation to environmental conditions on Sept. 26. The high Adirondacks were at peak color, so the trip was a great success aesthetically as well as scientifically. More ...
Evan Taddeo '11
Taddeo '11 Applies Parasite Research to Diabetes
Evan Taddeo ’11 is one of those people who isn’t too bothered by a parasite. Playing with them from their juvenile stage, he cares for the eggs, perpetuating a new generation of infective baby worms. Taddeo is beginning his thesis in the biology department over the summer, analyzing the life cycle of the mouse parasite Heligmosomoides bakeri (H. bakeri). More ...
Evan Taddeo '11, Andrew Brodsky '11, Sloane Lipkin '11
Student Researchers Explore Hypothyroidism
Place your hand on your throat. Whether you know it or not, you’re holding your thyroid glands, some of the most important in your body. The team of Sloane Lipkin ’11, Andrew Brodsky ’11 and Evan Taddeo ’11, working under Professor of Biology David Gapp, are working this summer to determine the effects of decreased thyroid function, or hypothyroidism, on mice. More ...
Danielle Lashley '13
Lashley '13 Seeks to Clone Fruit Flies
Armed with her pipette and sterile gloves, Danielle Lashley ’13 carefully transfers the solution from her test tube to the petri dishes in front of her. But the solution she so cautiously maneuvers is store-bought Juicy Juice, used to attract flies so she can work with their embryos. Lashley is attempting to clone and catalog the development of two gap genes of the common fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, in embryos. More ...
Ernest Williams
Williams Presents at Biology of Butterflies Conference
Christian A. Johnson Professor of Biology Ernest Williams recently presented a talk at the 6th International Conference on the Biology of Butterflies, held at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Alberta. More ...
Sumithra Nair '12
Sumithra Nair ’12 Researching TBhR Protein
In the brain of every insect embryo, budding neurons grow and develop, in the same way as in the human brain. The protein tyramene beta hydroxelase (TBh) has been found in the budding neurons in insect embryos, as well as its relative TBhR (R is for “related”). Sumithra Nair ’12, working with Professor of Biology Herman Lehman, will try to shed some light on this common, essential yet enigmatic protein. More ...
Libby Pendery '10 and Agne Jakubauskaite ’13.
Where New York Meets Antarctica
In a small lab on the second floor of the Science Center, two identical-looking vials of specimens sit side by side, waiting to be processed. But although the samples may appear to be the same, they were collected from almost opposite sides of the Earth: Green Lake in Fayetteville, N.Y., and Antarctica’s Hughes Bay. Working under Associate Professor of Biology Michael McCormick, Libby Pendery ’10 and Agne Jakubauskaite ’13 are using similar methods of analysis on samples from two very different locations to  detect and classify the species of microbes that are present at different depths. More ...
Shahin Islam '12, Suman Sarker '11 and Barsha Baral '13.
Group Looks at Genetics to Categorize Nematodes
Fever, coughing, vomiting, diarrhea: all of these are symptoms of parasite infestation. Nematodes are one of the most common types of human, animal and plant parasites. Not all nematodes are parasitic and not all parasites are nematodes, but these microscopic creatures are part of one of the most diverse phyla on the planet. Suman Sarker ’11, Barsha Baral ’13 and Shahin Islam ’12 working under Assistant Professor of Biology Wei-Jen Chang and Visiting Assistant Professor of Biology Ashleigh Smythe, are looking at genetics to more thoroughly categorize nematodes. More ...
Joseph Lobel '13
Joseph Lobel ’13 Tracks Mysterious Jumping Genes
In the DNA of every cell in your body, segments of DNA are constantly jumping and shifting locations. These jumping segments are called transposons and they usually contain the building blocks for genes, but do not provide your body with blueprints like regular genes. But in a group of microorganisms called ciliated protists, some types of transposons (called Telomere-Bearing Element, or TBE, transposons) do contain genes, and they are sometimes even expressed. Working under Assistant Professor of Biology Wei-Jen Chang, Joseph Lobel ’13 is spending his summer trying to detect and sequence these elusive, mobile genes. More ...
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