05BF5C3D-FE25-CDD2-D0B43F36A4F6028E
15F328E9-0287-A0D8-FDE517CB347CB61F
Public Events
Public Events Calendar >>

DIRECTIONS AND COLLEGE MAP

Media Relations
315-859-4680

Biology  RSS Feed

71 to 80 out of 149

A view of Panama Bay from Naos Lab
Smythe Joins Research Team in Panama

In December, Visiting Assistant Professor of Biology Ashleigh Smythe joined nine other scientists for two weeks of field research on the Pacific coast of Panama. The team was based at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute’s marine research laboratory on Naos Island in Panama Bay on the outskirts of Panama City and near the entrance to the Panama Canal.  More ...

monarchs in flight
TIME for Kids Quotes Williams on Monarchs

Time for Kids, a a weekly classroom news magazine produced by TIME Inc. that covers “a wide range of real-world topics,” focused its Sept. 30 issue on monarch butterflies. Professor of Biology Ernest Williams was quoted extensively throughout the two lead articles that also referenced his recently published study on the decline of monarchs.  More ...

Professor Bill Pfitsch's group on Sept. 25.
Ecology Class Treks to Adirondacks

For the 28th consecutive year, the Ecology course (Bio. 237) traipsed to the top of Whiteface Mountain. This year's class was so large that it was split into two separate trips. As usual, the weather for this trip was unpredictable. The first trip took place on Sept. 25 with Prof. Bill Pfitsch and found warmth, blue skies and grand vistas. The second trip, led by Prof. Ernest Williams on Oct. 2, encountered dense overcast skies, rain and chilly temperatures.  More ...

E. O. Wilson
Biologist E.O. Wilson Urges Protection for Biodiversity

Biologist E.O. Wilson made the case for the protection of biodiversity in a lecture titled “The Creation: An Appeal to Save Life on Earth,” on Monday, Oct. 3. The Biology and Environmental Studies departments brought Wilson to Hamilton for the annual James S. Plant Distinguished Scientist Lecture.


   More ...

Nick Richards '12
Richards ’12 Researcher in Nature Article

Nick Richards ’12 was a member of a research team whose article, “CTCF-binding elements mediate control of V(D)J recombination,” was recently published in Nature, an international weekly science journal. The article presents the results of work conducted at the Departments of Genetics and Molecular Medicine at Harvard Medical School/Boston Children’s Hospital/Immune Disease Institute.  More ...

Professors David Gapp (left) and Jonathan Vaughan.
Professors Gapp and Vaughan Named to Endowed Chairs

Dean of Faculty Patrick D. Reynolds announced the appointment of two of Hamilton's most outstanding teacher-scholars to endowed chairs. Professor of Biology David Gapp was appointed to the Silas D. Childs Chair, and Professor of Psychology Jonathan Vaughan was appointed to the James L. Ferguson Chair. Both appointments were effective July 1.  More ...

Christopher Kline, James Liebow, Prof. Ashleigh Smythe, Kristin Forgrave, Abby Koppa, Jacyln Specht
Smythe Lab Investigates Parasitic Worms

Parasitic species can help control their hosts’ populations and add to an ecosystem’s biodiversity. This summer Kristin Forgrave ’12, Christopher Kline ’12, James Liebow ’13, Jaclyn Specht ’12, and Abby Koppa ’12 worked with Visiting Assistant Professor of Biology Ashleigh Smythe on a project to explore parasitic worms in natural habitats.  The group worked on three separate projects that dealt with different worm species and hosts.  More ...

Daniel Feinberg, Bethany O'Meara, Matthew Combs, Dilyana Mihaylova, Ana Fernandez-Menjivar
Bio. Researchers Map Unwelcome Visitors in Glens

Hamilton’s Kirkland and Rogers glens offer beautiful forest paths for joggers, dog-walkers and nature lovers. Hidden within the lush greenery, a well-trained eye can spot several plant species growing there that aren’t native to the glens. Invasive plant species in forests have the potential to interfere with native plants and animals, as well as disrupt the microbial balance of the soil. Five biology students and Professor Bill Pfitsch are mapping these unwelcome visitors in a summer research project.  More ...

Tani Leigh '12
Building a Better Tree

By organizing all eukaryotic species into groups and depicting their evolution in a tree-like structure, researchers shape a better understanding of how different sets of organisms relate to one another and how they evolved. However beneficial these trees might be, there is some debate as to which genetic markers should serve as the trees’ organizing principle, as well as which method of grouping should be utilized. Tani Leigh ’12 is working with Assistant Professor of Biology Wei-Jen Chang this summer to create a new version of the eukaryotic phylogenetic tree using ribosomal proteins.  More ...

Melanie Hundt '13, Max Vaickus '12 and Nicole Nietlisbach '13
Model Organisms Give Insight to Human Biology

When working with human afflictions such as hypothyroidism and diabetes, researchers find it beneficial to study model organisms that can exhibit the same conditions. Animals such as mice and turtles, for example, can provide insight about the biological traits and medical conditions they share with humans. This summer Melanie Hundt ’13, Nicole Nietlisbach ’13 and Max Vaickus ’12 examined hypothyroidism and diabetes in mice and tested for the hormone ghrelin in turtles. The students worked with Professor of Biology David Gapp.  More ...

<<First   <Back   6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15   Next>   Last>>
Cupola