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Akritee Shrestha, Christopher Rider, Prof. Myriam Cotten, Leah Cairns, Robert Hayden, Victoria Bogen.
Cotten, Students Visit National High Magnetic Field Lab

Associate Professor of Chemistry Myriam Cotten and her research team spent 10 days this summer at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in Tallahassee, Fla., to study piscidins, antimicrobial peptides from fish. Student researchers were Akritee Shrestha ’13, Christopher Rider ’12,  Leah Cairns ’13, Robert Hayden ’14 and Victoria Bogen ’14.  More ...

Hillary Langat '13, Allison Boyaris '12, Professor Timothy Chapp, Shawon Akanda '12, Barsha Baral'13.
Separating Chemicals in Solutions Proves Challenging

The chemicals in pharmaceutical drugs must be carefully controlled to ensure that only one specific 3-D arrangement of each molecule ends up in the drug. However, separating very similar chemicals from a solution can pose significant challenges to researchers. This summer four students are working under Visiting Assistant Professor of Chemistry Timothy Chapp to separate phosphine enantiomers.  More ...

Robert Hayden '14, Christopher Rider '12, Leah Cairns '13, Victoria  Bogen '14, Akritee Shrestha '13.
Students Seek Solution to Peptide Structure

Piscidin is an antimicrobial peptide found in hybrid striped bass which binds to cell membranes in order to destroy them. Victoria Bogen ’14, Robert Hayden ’14, Akritee Shrestha ’13, Leah Cairns ’13 and Christopher Rider ’12 are working with Associate Professor of Chemistry Myriam Cotten to conduct research on piscidin. Their research aims to solve the peptide’s structure and behavior in various conditions.  More ...

Robin Kinnel
Kinnel Presents at Pharmacognosy Meeting

Silas D. Childs Professor of Chemistry Emeritus Robin B. Kinnel presented a poster titled “Two Unusual Chlorinated Metabolites from Lyngbya bouillonii Revealed by MALDI Analysis” at the 52nd national meeting of the American Society of Pharmacognosy on Aug. 1 in San Diego. The work, accomplished primarily while he was on sabbatical leave at Scripps Institution of Oceanography during the spring of 2010, capitalized on a new technique for discovering potentially useful natural products.  More ...

Aaron Danilack '13, Professor Robin Kinnel and Jeffrey Blackburn '13.
Students Synthesize Newly-Discovered Molecule

Chemistry Professor Robin Kinnel has recently discovered the chemical compound dichlorobouillonamide, which is released by a cyanobacteria in the Lyngbya family. The chemical has never been studied in depth, and it is possible that dichlorobouillonamide has potential applications in pain treatment. This summer Aaron Danilack ’13 and Jeffrey Blackburn ’13 are working with Kinnel to carry out a laboratory synthesis of dichlorobouillonamide.  More ...

Alvin Wu '13, Carmen Montagnon '13, Dan Mermelstein '14.
Chemistry Students Present at MERCURY Conference

Over the weekend of July 29,  Dan Mermelstein’14, Carmen Montagnon ’13 and Alvin Wu ’13 presented their research at the 10th Molecular Educational Research Consortium in Undergraduate Computational chemistRY (MERCURY) conference at Bucknell University. The three students have been working this summer in the laboratory of Assistant Professor of Chemistry Adam Van Wynsberghe.  More ...

Christopher Richardson '14 and Kevin Boettger '13
Recycled Enzymes

Enzymes serve as catalysts to many biological processes, and so they are not used up in reactions and they may be recovered and reused. However, in a laboratory setting, reactions involving enzymes can leave the enzyme unrecoverable. Kevin Boettger ’13 and Christopher Richardson ’14 are spending the summer working under Professor of Chemistry Tim Elgren to trap enzymes in Sol gels, making them more stable and recyclable. Their project is titled “Encapsulation of Enzymes.”  More ...

Edward '46 and Virginia Taylor
Hamilton Receives Largest Gift in Its History

Hamilton has received notification from the SunUp Foundation of a $16 million donation, the single most generous act of philanthropy in the college’s history. Edward ’46 and Virginia Taylor, directors for the foundation, recently informed the college of the commitment, which will establish Hamilton’s largest financial aid endowment and provide support for faculty research in the sciences and new arts facilities.  More ...

Alvin Wu '13, Carmen Montagnon '13 and Daniel Mermelstein '14.
Students Take on Influenza in Summer Research

Influenza viruses spread quickly, are quite common and can have devastating consequences. Thus, drugs that help restrict the spread of influenza not only shorten the sickness, but save lives. This summer Daniel Mermelstein ’14, Carmen Montagnon ’13 and Alvin Wu ’13 are conducting research under Assistant Professor of Chemistry Adam Van Wynsberghe to examine the chemical interactions that these important drugs rely on to combat the flu.  More ...

Talia Steiman '12 and Robert Woodworth '12.
Students Work on Innovative Chemical Synthesis

For organic chemists, improvements in methods of synthesizing molecules can make big differences in the time and material that go into the molecule’s synthesis. This summer, Talia Steiman ’12 and Robert Woodworth ’12 are working with Associate Professor of Chemistry Ian Rosenstein on a chemical synthesis that utilizes a unique method to simplify the process and cut down on waste.  More ...

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