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Asad Javed '16
Asad Javed ’16 Reimagines Moliere's Tartuffe Through Costume Design

Asad Javed ’16 is working this summer through an Emerson Grant to transpose the Moliere classic Tartuffe into a number of new settings, in a project titled “Unholy Vanities and Holy Prose: A Reimagination of Moliere's Tartuffe through Costume Design.” Javed, a French and  interdisciplinary studies (film) double major, is undertaking this project in creative collaboration with Visiting Assistant Professor of Theatre Andrew Holland.  More ...

Mackenzie Leavenworth '15, right, on site in Gournia, Greece, in 2013.
Archaeology Magazine Highlights McEnroe’s Role in Study of Ancient Site

John McEnroe, the John and Anne Fischer Professor in Fine Arts, is co-leader of a team that is working on a complete architectural survey of the town of Gournia on the island of Crete. The work was highlighted in a lengthy article in the May/June issue of Archaeology magazine. “The Minoans of Crete” focused on site excavation that began more than a century ago.  More ...

Matt Currier '17 and Assistant Professor of History John Eldevik worked together on a 2014 Emerson research project.
Emerson Summer Research Recipients Announced

Recipients of the 2015 Emerson Summer Collaborative Research Grants were recently announced by the Dean of Faculty's office. Created in 1997, the Emerson Foundation Grant program was designed to provide students with significant opportunities to work collaboratively with faculty members, researching an area of interest. Twenty-five Hamilton students and 23 faculty members will be working on the following projects this summer.   More ...

Victoria Lin '15
Victoria Lin '15 Studies Muslim Identity Through Emerson Grant

Under the name of France’s long-standing tradition of secularism, called laïcité, French law has restricted many Islamic religious practices in the last decade. These new laws, often dubbed Islamophobic by the international community, include banning the burqa and niqab in public spaces, forbidding headscarves in public schools and restricting public prayer. This summer, Victoria Lin ’15 examined the impact of these laws on Muslim identity through her Emerson Grant with Professor of French Cheryl Morgan.  More ...

Hannah Chappell '15 and Professor of English Onno Oerlemans.
Hannah Chappell ’15 Examines the Intersection of Literature and Dance

For her Emerson Grant this summer, Hannah Chappell ’15 is working with Professor of English Onno Oerlemans on a project titled “Moving Through Language: The Intersection of Literature, Dance and Performance.” She'll research authors whose texts contain elements of dance; choreographers and dancers whose work includes elements of literature;  and examine how literary theory can be applied to dance.  More ...

The Death of the Dollar Bill: The Rise of Bitcoin and Other Online Currencies

With the digitization of information, cyberspace is a developing network that’s changing how we live. In 2009, the first digital currency, Bitcoin, was invented.  Bitcoin has been called a “decentralized virtual currency” by some economists, due to the fact that it is transferred from one user to another, called peer-to-peer or P2P, without the use of any central bank.  Sitong Chen ’16, with Professor of Economics Christophre Georges, worked this summer on an Emerson project, “Analysis of the Internet-born Currency: The Birth of Bitcoin.”  More ...

John Rufo '16
The Echoes of Ezra Pound

The Cantos, by 1905 Hamilton alumnus Ezra Pound, is an 800-page, unfinished epic poem that is divided into 120 sections, or cantos. The work is widely regarded as controversial due to its experimental style, being loosely structured and arcane, and Pound’s publicized fascist sympathies. “A good deal of the political and economic material in the Cantos is [infamously] wrong-headed,” John Rufo ’16 stated, “but the poetic method and forms are not inherently fascist or anything like that.”  More ...

Brenda Narvaez ’17
Brenda Narvaez ’17 Studying Day Laborers in Emerson Project

While many people say they “have to” go to work, others are just happy when they have a job to go to. Many take for granted the security offered by  jobs: making at least minimum wage and being protected by workers’ rights.  But day laborers, individuals who are hired on a day-to-day basis with no guarantee of future work, do not enjoy the same stability. Brenda Narvaez ’17,  is spending the summer in Brooklyn, N.Y., examining this phenomenon.  More ...

Ianno Recco '16, right, with Professor John McEnroe on Crete.
The Living Past: Archaeological Excavations Bring Ancient City to Life

Today, the written word is widespread and highly structured; yet, there was a point when writing was in its infancy. Almost 5,000 years ago Europe and Asia Minor entered what is known as the Bronze Age, which lasted approximately 2,500 years, and was characterized by proto-writing, early literature, and the widespread use and trade of bronze, allowing for inventions such as the chariot and sword. Ianna Recco ’16 is bringing one such society to life through her Emerson project, “Gournia Excavation Project.”  More ...

Matt Currier '16, right, reviews documents with Assistant Professor of History John Eldevik.
A King and His Kingdom

Before England was united under the monarchy, kings had to establish their legitimacy to gain and maintain power. Loyalty to the king, and support of his authority, were not yet attached to the crown, but had to be won. To discover how this was done, Matthew Currier '16 is examining royal diplomas, a type of charter specific to the crown.  More ...

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