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281 to 290 out of 331

Acts of the Apostles
As American-led forces assemble in Saudi Arabia for the largest military operation since Normandy, computer designer Todd Griffith discovers a secret function burried within the Kali chip. That night he is shot. Five years later, burnt-out Silicon Valley software engineer Nick Aubrey boards a "red-eye" flight to Boston and winds up seated next to a very disturbed man who claims to know the secret of Gulf War Syndrome. More ...
How the Body Prays
Peter Weltner '64 is the author of How the Body Prays (Saint Paul, MN: Graywolf Pr., 1999). An "exquisitely written" work, the chronicle of a family, its courage, cowardice, and pride, as distinctively viewed by its diverse members from generation to generation. "A family saga of unusual complexity," lyrical in quality, by an award-winning fiction writer who teaches at San Francisco State University. More ...
Philadelphia: A New Urban Direction
Philadelphia: A New Urban Direction poses the question: What must city government do to make the City of Philadelphia a preferred place to live, work, and play into the next century? Philadelphia City Controller Jonathan Saidel and his associates in the City Controller's Office treat the reader to an extraordinary insider's account of the inner workings of city government, utilize sophisticated modeling techniques to present a vision of Philadelphia's future, and present a plethora of novel ideas for improving the city for the 21st-century. It presents the fullest assessment to date of the overall economic, governmental, and social dynamics shaping Philadelphia and the region; serves as a primer to understanding city government and public policy for citizens, policy professionals, and elected leaders alike; and convincingly demonstrates the interconnectedness of the city and its suburbs. More ...
The Most Dangerous Area in the World: John F. Kennedy Confronts Communist Revolution in Latin America
In March 1961, President John F. Kennedy announced the formation of the Alliance for Progress, a program dedicated to creating prosperous, socially just, democratic societies throughout Latin America. Over the next few years, the United States spent nearly $20 billion in pursuit of the Alliance's goals, but Latin American economies barely grew, Latin American societies remained inequitable, and sixteen extra constitutional changes of government rocked the region. In this close, critical analysis, Stephen Rabe explains why Kennedy's grand plan for Latin America proved such a signal policy failure. More ...
Helpful Hints for Enjoying Coin Collecting
Every day, people from all walks of life join the ranks of coin collectors. Until now, there has been no single source of information to which novice collectors could refer for the knowledge they need to adequately and safely get started. In this easy-to-use book, Bill Fivaz shares his experience of over 50 years of coin collecting to provide the reader with the information, advice, and skills one needs to have FUN in this popular hobby. More ...
Arethusa: Vile Bodies, Roman Satire and Corporeal Discourse
“This is an essay about bodies: how they are represented and what that representation reveals about the fears, desires, and attitudes of the society that produced them. Concepts of physiology and corporeality determine identity--both male and female, but especially female--throughout ancient texts. I am interested in discovering how Roman satire defined the relationship between body and "self" for women: how it shaped, controlled, and represented the female self through the gendering of the body. My original intention in writing this essay was to examine the bodies of women as they are represented in the Roman satirists. But I soon realized that I was both confining myself too narrowly and also spreading myself over too wide an area. As I reread the texts, two things became clear: female bodies could only be examined in the context of bodies in general, and Juvenal has a unique way, among all the Roman satirists, of focalizing bodies.” -Preface of “The House I Live In Is Not My Own”: Women’s Bodies in Juvenal’s Satires, Barbara Gold More ...
The Union and the World
During the last decade Europe has been transformed both politically and commercially. The establishment of a genuinely single marketplace in the context of an expanding membership has enabled the European Union greatly to enhance its role on the world stage. This pioneering work edited by Alan Cafruny, professor of international affairs at Hamilton College and Patrick Peters of European University Institute, present a comprehensive picture of the union's foreign economic policies and actions, its foreign security polcy, and supernational nature of much Union decision-making. More ...
Baseball's Last Dynasty: Charlie Finley's Oakland A's
The winner of the Society for American Baseball Research’s Seymour Medal as the best baseball book of 1998, this newly released edition contains new material including updated and expanded accounts from the raucous 1972 regular season and World Series—in celebration of the 30th anniversary of the team known as the “Mustache Gang”—year-by-year statistical summaries of Oakland’s dynastic run, and newsmaking headlines from the turbulent 1970s. More ...
Authorizing Readers: Resistance and Respect in the Teaching of Literature
Authorizing Readers: Resistance and Respect in the Teaching of Literature is a provocative conversation between co-authors that brings to life the symbiotic relationship between theory and practice. This unique collaboration between a literary critic/college professor (Peter J. Rabinowitz) and a high school English teacher/education professor (Michael W. Smith) provides readers with a rich discussion of a central paradox faced by literature teachers: Can teachers claim to have taught well if their students have not learned to recognize (and respect) the ways authors expect them to read? But at the same time, shouldn’t students be taught the critical skills of resisting both what authors expect and what teachers see as the right reading? Though each of the authors has a somewhat different view, Rabinowitz and Smith show that what they call "authorial reading" is not only compatible with, but even essential to, progressive teaching and truly engaged readers. More ...
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