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Niko Wagner '14 and Ashley Perritt in the lab.
Students Research Neurotransmitters in Fruit Fly Cells

It might sound surprising, but studying two neurotransmitters found in drosophila, a genus of small flies, may help us better understand human brain chemistry.  While most people may not regularly think about neurotransmitters in our brains, these chemicals are the stimuli behind our frustrations when stuck in traffic or our elevated stress levels when facing a seemingly never-ending pile of assignments. Ashley Perritt ’14 and Niko Wagner ’14 are studying tyramine beta hydroxylase (TBh) and TBh-Related (TBhR) neurotransmitter genes in drosophila to better understand their functions.  More ...

Jessica Li '14, Agne Jakubauskaite '13 and Olusegun Ogunwomoju '15.
Passing the Torch

Agne Jakubauskaite ’13 has come full circle in the course of her undergraduate research of the newly discovered gene TBhR. Jakubauskaite, a biology concentrator, spent the summer of 2011 learning the ins and outs of protein expression and synthesizing and has now passed on those skills to Jessica Li ’14, a biology concentrator and Olusegun Ogunwomoju ’15.   More ...

Agne Jakubauskaite, Sarah Weatherall, Emily Tangren, Luis Santos.
Unlocking the Puzzle of Neurological Disease

The formation of a synapse, the junction between nerve cells, is one of the most the most important and critical stages of nervous system development, and in many cases improper synapse formation is the underlying cause of neurological disease.  The Lehman Lab has discovered a new gene that appears to encode an enzyme that is expressed as synapses develop in invertebrate and vertebrate nervous systems. This summer four students are working to synthesize four different enzymes to explore the function of this novel gene product.  More ...

Herm Lehman
Lehman Lectures at Scripps Institute in Florida

Professor of Biology Herm Lehman gave an invited lecture titled “Monooxygenases: from neurotransmitter synthesis to neurogenesis” to members of the Neuroscience, Metabolism and Aging, and HTS Lead Identification Departments at the Scripps Institute, Jupiter, Fla., on April 20.  More ...

Herm Lehman
Lehman Presents at SICB

Professor of Biology Herm Lehman presented his paper "The Cellular and Molecular Biology of Octopaminergic Neurons" at the annual meeting of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology in Salt Lake City on Jan 6.  More ...

Six Faculty Members Promoted to Professor
Six members of the Hamilton College faculty have been promoted to the rank of professor. Associate professors Debra Boutin, mathematics; Naomi Guttman, English; Shoshana Keller, history; Doran Larson, English; Herm Lehman biology; and Gary Wyckoff, government, were promoted, effective July 1. More ...
William Stateman '10
Fruit Fly Genes Are Topic of Summer Research
On the surface, humans and flies may seem to have very different embryonic development; while it takes nine months for one human baby to develop, hundreds of fly eggs can hatch in the incubation period of only 24 hours. But, in both species, the undifferentiated embryo separates at some point to become different segments and appendages to the body. The molecules that trigger these differentiating genes are called morphogens, and each species has hundreds to thousands of them in its genome. William Stateman ’10 is trying to identify the effects of one specific morphogen on embryos of fruit flies. More ...
Sumithra Nair '12
Sumithra Nair ’12 Researching TBhR Protein
In the brain of every insect embryo, budding neurons grow and develop, in the same way as in the human brain. The protein tyramene beta hydroxelase (TBh) has been found in the budding neurons in insect embryos, as well as its relative TBhR (R is for “related”). Sumithra Nair ’12, working with Professor of Biology Herman Lehman, will try to shed some light on this common, essential yet enigmatic protein. More ...
Rosenstein and May Graduates Griffith, Parkhurst and McKee Attend National Organic Symposium

Associate Professor of Chemistry Ian Rosenstein and three students participated in the 40th National Organic Symposium, sponsored by the Division of Organic Chemistry of the American Chemical Society at Duke University, June 3-7. The students, Daniel Griffith, Silas McKee and Rebecca Parkhurst, all graduated from Hamilton in May. The three students made four poster presentations. Griffith was a co-author on two posters, one with Rosenstein and the other co-authored with Associate Professor of Biology Herm Lehman. McKee's poster was co-authored by Greg Nizialek '08 and Assistant Professor of Chemistry Camille Jones and Rosenstein. Parkhurst and Rosenstein were the authors on her poster.  More ...

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