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Jay G. Williams '54
Williams '54 Publishes Article
Walcott-Bartlett Professor of Religious Studies Jay G. Williams '54 recently published an article,"The Spiritual in Poetry," on the Bestthinking.com Web site. The site is not open to everyone but recognized scholars are invited to join and submit articles to share with other members and the world. More ...
Jay G. Williams '54
Williams Publishes Article on Web Site
Jay Williams ’54, the Walcott-Bartlett Professor of Religion, published an article, "The Gospel of John (or is it Ch'an)" on the bibleinterp.com Web site. As the title suggests, it offers a rather different approach to the fourth gospel, spelling out in more detail what Williams said at the Service of Remembrance during Reunions ’09 weekend. More ...
Jay Williams '54
Williams Publishes Book Review in Quest
Jay Williams '54, the Walcott-Bartlett Professor of Religion, published a book review of Catherine L. Albanese, A Republic of the Mind and Spirit: A Cultural History of American Metaphysical Religion (Yale University Press, 2007) in the summer 2009 edition of the Quest. More ...
Thomas Nast's Republican Elephant, Harper's Weekly, 1874
Williams '54 to Present on Political Cartoonist

Professor of Religious Studies Jay Williams '54 will present an Alumni College during Reunions '09 on Thomas Nast, one of America's great political cartoonist.  Nast is credited with the creation of the Republican Elephant and the iconic Uncle Sam.  More ...

Jay Williams
Williams '54 Article Featured on Bible and Interpretation Web Site
A new essay by Jay Williams '54, the Walcott-Bartlett Professor of Religion, is the featured article on the Bible and Interpretation Web site. In the article, "Mark, the gospel of radical transformation," Williams proposes a somewhat new interpretation of the ancient gospel based upon a literary rather than an historical meaning of the text. More ...
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