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Margaret Thickstun  RSS Feed

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Liz Morris '16 presses an inked plate onto paper in the print shop at the Farmer's Museum with the help of Ted Shuart.
Students Learn the Art of Letter Press Printing

The students of Professor of English Margaret Thickstun’s “Experience of Reading” class took a step back in time on Feb. 23 with a visit to the Farmers’ Museum in Cooperstown. An hour away from Hamilton College, Cooperstown is best known as the home of the Baseball Hall of Fame, but the destination this day was its quaint historic village.  More ...

Female faculty authors were honored at a book party.
Scholarly Achievements of Hamilton's Female Faculty Celebrated

The scholarly achievements of female faculty authors in the humanities and social sciences at Hamilton College were celebrated at a book party in the Burke Library this winter.   More ...

Participants in February's Milton Marathon at Hamilton.
Thickstun's Milton Marathon Featured in USA Today

Margaret Thickstun, the Elizabeth J. McCormack Professor of English, was featured in a USA Today article (5/12/11) about her Milton Marathon. The article was reprinted from Inside Higher Ed. Alumnus John C. Ulreich, ’63 a Milton scholar at the University of Arizona, was also featured in the article for holding the 13th annual Milton Marathon at the University of Arizona.  More ...

Participants in the 2011 Milton Marathon.
Readers Confront Paradise Lost

The second annual Milton Marathon drew avid Paradise Lost fans, members of English classes, faculty and interested bystanders to the browsing area of Burke Library on Feb. 27. Margie Thickstun, the Elizabeth J. McCormack Professor of English, organized the marathon for her English 228 class.  More ...

Professor Margie Thickstun and her Experience of Reading students in Cooperstown.
English Class Steps Back in Time With Visit to Farmer's Museum

Ben Franklin probably would have loved the Internet. As colonial America’s most famous printer, Franklin ran a shop that served a very similar role to the Internet as we know it today. He dispersed all manner of information to the inhabitants of the colonies: legal documents, newspapers, and publications like Poor Richard’s Almanack, which Franklin himself wrote under the pseudonym of Richard Saunders.  More ...

Tory Grieves '12 reads a section of <em>Paradise Lost</em> during the Milton Marathon.
Milton Marathon Takes on Paradise Lost

Some visitors to Burke Library on Feb. 27 were sidetracked by a group of readers in the browsing area who were participating in the second Milton Marathon. Organized by Margaret Thickstun, the Elizabeth J. McCormack Professor of English, the event featured a day-long reading of Milton’s epic poem Paradise Lost.  More ...

The marathon reading of <em>Paradise Lost</em>  last spring.
New York Times Features Hamilton's Milton Marathon

The New York Times featured Hamilton’s marathon reading of John Milton's epic poem Paradise Lost in an article in the Education Life section of the Sunday, Jan. 9, edition. Orchestrated last spring by Elizabeth J. McCormack Professor of English Margaret Thickstun, the 12-hour Milton fest drew some 60 students, faculty and community members.  More ...

Participants in the marathon reading of Milton's <em>Paradise Lost</em>.
Milton Marathon Reading of Paradise Lost Tempts 60
This semester's Milton class hosted a marathon reading of John Milton's epic poem Paradise Lost on April 11 in Burke Library. The 12-hour Milton fest drew some 60 students, faculty and community members, according to Margaret Thickstun, the Elizabeth J. McCormack Professor of English, who teaches the class. More ...
Thickstun's Book Milton's Paradise Lost: Moral Education Lauded in The New Yorker
A book by Professor of English Margaret Thickstun is applauded in a New Yorker magazine essay "Return to paradise, The enduring relevance of John Milton" by Jonathan Rosen (6/2/08). The essay, which celebrates the 400th anniversary of English poet John Milton's birth, examines the variety of books recently published to mark the occasion. In The New Yorker author Rosen writes, "My favorite of all the recent Milton books, Margaret Olofson Thickstun's Milton's Paradise Lost: Moral Education, points out how occupied with teaching and learning everyone—except Satan—is. (Milton's only real job, before his role as Secretary for Foreign Tongues, was as a teacher and tutor.)"
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