05BF5C3D-FE25-CDD2-D0B43F36A4F6028E
15F328E9-0287-A0D8-FDE517CB347CB61F
Public Events
Public Events Calendar >>

DIRECTIONS AND COLLEGE MAP

Media Relations
315-859-4680

Physics  RSS Feed

41 to 50 out of 58

Ileana Becerra '11, Will Eagan '11 and Anne Vilsoet '11.
Physics Team Sets its Sights on Synthesized Sky
Sitting in front of a computer screen, scientists spend hours staring at satellite images of outer space, searching for exploding supernovae. But surprisingly, visual identification is the main way that astronomical laboratories identify supernovae. Led by Assistant Professor of Physics Natalia Connolly, Ileana Becerra ’11, Anne Vilsoet ’11 and Will Eagan ’11 are creating a smarter computer program that will more reliably detect supernovae in satellite images. More ...
Leonard Teng '12
Finding Order in Chaos
To the average person, chaos is a concept that lacks any form of organization or order. In everyday language, chaos can mean disaster, tumult or lawlessness. But to a physicist, chaos is just another form of complex behavior. This summer, Leonard Teng ’12 is working to perfect an apparatus developed by Litchfield Professor of Physics Peter Millet and Director of Laboratories/Head Technician Jim Schreve that allows the user to better calculate and demonstrate the properties of chaotic motion. More ...
Sarah Fobes ’12 and Zane Glauber ’12
A Bright Idea
Standing in the dark lab, Sarah Fobes ’12 and Zane Glauber ’12 flip the switch to turn on their laser. In the blink of an eye, the tiny glass sample that they had labored over glows a radioactive green—with any luck, a brighter green than the last one they illuminated. Working with Professor of Physics Ann Silversmith, Fobes and Glauber are spending the summer experimenting with different aspects of glass formation to make it fluoresce (or glow) more brightly, with the indirect consequence of being able to make a better laser. More ...
Natalia Connolly
Connolly Granted Use of Hubble Space Telescope for Galaxy Study
Assistant Professor of Physics Natalia Connolly has been granted observing time on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) during its “Cycle 18,” which runs from Sept. 1, 2010, through Aug. 31, 2011. HST cycles are time periods during which research projects, selected in a highly competitive peer review process, are executed. Fewer than one-third of all research proposals are accepted. Cycle 18 will have about 3,000 HST orbits available to researchers.
More ...
Adam Van Wynsberghe
Interdisciplinary Group Receives NSF Grant to Extend Hamilton Scientific Computing Resources
A group of four Hamilton faculty members has been awarded a grant of $177,950 through the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Major Research Instrumentation (MRI) program to fund a shared-use state of the art computing cluster. The project, titled "MRI-R2: Acquisition of a High Performance Computing cluster with a fast interconnect to enable shared-use, college-wide computational investigations at Hamilton College” is led by Assistant Professor of Chemistry Adam Van Wynsberghe as principal investigator with Assistant Professor of Biology Wei-Jen Chang, Assistant Professor of Physics Natalia Connolly, and Assistant Professor of Anthropology Nathan Goodale contributing as co-principal investigators. More ...
Philip Pearle
Pearle Honored for Service to APS Journals
Professor of Physics Emeritus Philip Pearle has been named an Outstanding Referee of the Physical Review and Physical Review Letters journals for 2010. The award is given to scientists who have been exceptionally helpful in providing peer reviews of manuscripts submitted for publication in American Physical Society journals.
More ...
Will Eagan '11
Will Eagan '11 Presents at AAS
Will Eagan '11 presented a poster at the 215th meeting of the American Astronomical Society (AAS) in Washington, D.C., on Jan. 4. The annual meeting of the AAS is the main conference for professional astronomers in North America. Eagan's poster was titled "Comparison of Properties of High- and Low-Redshift Ultra-luminous Infrared Galaxies." It resulted from research he conducted last summer in collaboration with Assistant Professor of Physics Natalia Connolly and Dr. Brian Connolly, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Pennsylvania and scholar-in-residence at Hamilton.
More ...
Ann Silversmith
Silversmith Co-Authors Paper in Journal of Luminescence
A paper by Professor of Physics Ann Silversmith and former Hamilton students Nguyen T.T. Nguyen '08 and Dan Campbell '08, has been published in the December 2009 issue of the Journal of Luminescence. The article, "Fluorescence yield in rare earth doped sol-gel silicate glasses," was also co-authored by Carlos Ortiz '08 and Dan Boye of Davidson College and Kurt Hoffman of Whitman College. More ...
Natalia Connolly
Connolly Granted NSF Super-Computing Teragrid Access
Assistant Professor of Physics Natalia Connolly has been awarded computing time on the TeraGrid, an open scientific super-computing infrastructure funded by the National Science Foundation. This award is for her work with ultra-high luminous infra-red galaxies (ULIRGs) and will allow her to continue her research begun last summer with Will Eagan '11 and University of Pennsylvania Postdoctoral Researcher Brian Connolly. More ...
Will Bauder '10
Will Bauder ’10 Spends Summer on aCORN Project at Indiana University
The electroweak force describes the confluence of two fundamental forces in nature (out of four): the electromagnetic force, and the weak force. “Electroweak” is a funny sounding name to begin with, and “weak force” does not sound very scientific – but both are, in fact, complicated concepts in particle physics. The weak force alone governs beta decay and its associated radioactivity. But when combined with the electromagnetic force, it controls neutron beta decay. The aCORN project is an effort to more accurately measure the electron antineutrino correlation termed “little a,” one of the parameters for neutron beta decay. This summer, William Bauder ’10 worked on the aCORN project at Indiana University, which collaborates with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Professor of Physics Gordon Jones guided him through the research. More ...
<<First   <Back   1 2 3 4 5 6   Next>   Last>>
Cupola