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From left: Hannah Lyons '14, Kelly Jenkins '14, Andraya Cole '14, David Borczuk '14, Claire Barton '14, Megan Blair '16.
Biology Group Studies Blood Sugar for Links to Obesity

Obesity and diabetes are serious issues that public health officials are focusing on.  A bulk of the scientific literature blames sedentary lifestyles for the increase in obesity.  However, the developing trend of people becoming categorized as obese is increasingly steep and Hamilton student researchers believe there are more biological and chemical components to the issues.  More ...

Sarah Mandel '15, Carrie Cabush '15, (Alex Cates '15 pictured on monitor), Summer Bottini '14, Mahima Karki '14
Tracking Movements to Find Answers

Picking up a spoon to stir your morning coffee seems uncomplicated enough, right? We simply see the object and move our hand until it is close enough to grab it. But how much harder does it become if the object gets smaller or farther away from us? Or what happens when we start using our non-dominant hand? Perhaps most of us could make an educated guess at how much harder it would make the task, but Paul Fitts took it one step further beyond just estimating.  More ...

Catherine Oglevee '15 and Laura Rivera '16
Students Examine Luminescence of Rare Earth Sol-gel Metals

The world of technology is changing at a rapid pace and new materials need to be utilized to make further advancements.  Rare earth metals are in a strong position to be more widely used for various applications, ranging from small electronic devices to large television screens. Laura Rivera ’16 and Catherine Oglevee ’15 are working with terbium and europium, two rare earth metals, this summer to understand their fluorescent properties.  More ...

Ashleigh Stephan '15 and Jacob Wagner '15
Preserving Proteins with Advanced Sol-Gel Technique

Enzymes and proteins, typically when left unattended or unprotected, can easily lose their structural integrity and fall apart. Sol-Gel is an emerging material that helps encapsulate the enzymes and protect them from the dangers of degradation. The technology can be used in numerous applications, one of them being a new method for slow-release medications. These slow release medicines allow for the introduction of necessary chemicals over a period of time, avoiding any negative side effects from releasing all the medication at once.  More ...

Douglas Santoro '14 in the lab.
Douglas Santoro ’14 Studies Toxic Effects of Garlic Mustard on Nematodes in Glen

The glens around campus are some of the most unique features of Hamilton’s 1,350-acre campus.  Filled with a variety of trees, wildlife, and nature paths, students often take advantage of the beautiful scenery.  However, keen eyes in the biology department took notice of an invasive plant and began investigating its negative impact on the glen environment.  More ...

 Bryce Timm, Christina Choinski, Professor Robin Kinnel, Sky Aulita, Laura McCormick.
Students Utilize Bacteria Derivation to Battle Cancer

Substantial improvements in cancer detection and treatment have been made over the years, and Hamilton students are concentrating in that research area as well.  Traditional cancer treatments, such as radiation therapy and chemotherapy, are relatively invasive and attack cancerous and non-cancerous cells alike.  These techniques may diminish or eliminate the cancer, but not without potentially detrimental side effects that leave the body distressed and fatigued.  New therapies are being developed to specifically target cancerous cells in order to have safer and more efficient treatments.

   More ...

Icebreaker Araon in the Ice
Domack and Christ '11 Continue Antarctica Research

On Thursday, April 11, 18 members of the LARISSA (Larsen Ice Shelf System Antarctica) science team and 26 additional scientists from the Korean Polar Research Institute sailed from  Chile toward the Antarctic Peninsula on the Korean Icebreaker Research Vessel ARAON. Among the LARISSA researchers are Eugene Domack, the J. W. Johnson Family Professorship of Environmental Studies, and his former advisee, alumnus Andrew Christ ’11, who is providing continuing information and images throughout the expedition via a blog on the LARISSA site.  More ...

Leah Krause '14
Krause ’14 and Clayton ’15 Seek New Ways to Prevent Influenza

One of the most common methods of combating the influenza virus is to utilize an inhibitor to prevent the binding of the viral protein neuraminidase with cell surface receptors terminating in a sialic acid moiety. While this may sound like a complex process, it’s actually relatively simple to understand once the scientific jargon has been translated. In order for a virus like influenza to continue its life cycle, its neuraminidase enzyme needs to bind to and cleave a sialic acid molecule away from the human cell receptors.  More ...

Leah Krause '14
Chemistry Students Present at MERCURY Conference

Rob Clayton ’15 and Leah Krause ’14 presented their research at the 11th Molecular Educational Research Consortium in Undergraduate Computational chemistRY (MERCURY) conference at Bucknell University. Both students have been working this summer in the laboratory of Assistant Professor of Chemistry Adam Van Wynsberghe.  More ...

Participants in the annual Summer Organic Research Symposium
Organic Chemistry Summer Researchers Present Results

At the end of their summer research, students from Hamilton, Colgate University. and Hobart and William Smith Colleges who did projects in organic chemistry gathered at Hamilton to present their results in a symposium on July 25. Each student spoke for 15 minutes and then responded to questions. A cookout at the Babbitt Pavilion followed.  More ...

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