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Sarah Mandel '15, Carrie Cabush '15, (Alex Cates '15 pictured on monitor), Summer Bottini '14, Mahima Karki '14
Tracking Movements to Find Answers

Picking up a spoon to stir your morning coffee seems uncomplicated enough, right? We simply see the object and move our hand until it is close enough to grab it. But how much harder does it become if the object gets smaller or farther away from us? Or what happens when we start using our non-dominant hand? Perhaps most of us could make an educated guess at how much harder it would make the task, but Paul Fitts took it one step further beyond just estimating.  More ...

Nate Goebel '15
Goebel ’15 Delves Into Chekhov in Emerson Project

Last fall, Nate Goebel ’15 realized that he wasn’t satisfied with the way he read plays and decided to improve his reading of what happens between the lines of dialogue. In an Emerson Foundation Grant project titled “Apocalypse at Dinner: A Creative-Minded Study of Anton Chekhov’s Craft,” Goebel will immerse himself in the plays and short stories of Anton Chekhov and will ultimately adapt one of the author's stories into a short play, developing a first-hand knowledge of playwriting.  More ...

 Jamie McLean '15 and Madison Beres '15 enjoying an introductory dive through Thetford Reef.
Domack, 18 Hamilton Students Head Down Under for Geology Field Course

Eugene Domack, the Joel W. Johnson Family Professor of Environmental Studies, and 18 Hamilton College students left June 7 for a three-week field course to Australia and Tasmania. Three flights and 30 hours later the group landed in Cairns, a city located on the coast of Northeast Australia.

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Catherine Oglevee '15 and Laura Rivera '16
Students Examine Luminescence of Rare Earth Sol-gel Metals

The world of technology is changing at a rapid pace and new materials need to be utilized to make further advancements.  Rare earth metals are in a strong position to be more widely used for various applications, ranging from small electronic devices to large television screens. Laura Rivera ’16 and Catherine Oglevee ’15 are working with terbium and europium, two rare earth metals, this summer to understand their fluorescent properties.  More ...

Neil Edwards '14
Levitt Researcher Examines Relationship Between China and Tanzania

There’s no shortage of media coverage when it comes to China’s booming economic sector.  Reforms dating back to the 1970s have launched China’s economy on a trajectory that was unfathomable 40 years ago.  Now that the country has established industrial and financial infrastructures, it is looking for ways to sustain its economic growth.  Neil Edwards ’14 is examining the developing investment of China in Tanzania to see if it fosters a mutually beneficial relationship between the countries.  More ...

Ashleigh Stephan '15 and Jacob Wagner '15
Preserving Proteins with Advanced Sol-Gel Technique

Enzymes and proteins, typically when left unattended or unprotected, can easily lose their structural integrity and fall apart. Sol-Gel is an emerging material that helps encapsulate the enzymes and protect them from the dangers of degradation. The technology can be used in numerous applications, one of them being a new method for slow-release medications. These slow release medicines allow for the introduction of necessary chemicals over a period of time, avoiding any negative side effects from releasing all the medication at once.  More ...

Douglas Santoro '14 in the lab.
Douglas Santoro ’14 Studies Toxic Effects of Garlic Mustard on Nematodes in Glen

The glens around campus are some of the most unique features of Hamilton’s 1,350-acre campus.  Filled with a variety of trees, wildlife, and nature paths, students often take advantage of the beautiful scenery.  However, keen eyes in the biology department took notice of an invasive plant and began investigating its negative impact on the glen environment.  More ...

 Bryce Timm, Christina Choinski, Professor Robin Kinnel, Sky Aulita, Laura McCormick.
Students Utilize Bacteria Derivation to Battle Cancer

Substantial improvements in cancer detection and treatment have been made over the years, and Hamilton students are concentrating in that research area as well.  Traditional cancer treatments, such as radiation therapy and chemotherapy, are relatively invasive and attack cancerous and non-cancerous cells alike.  These techniques may diminish or eliminate the cancer, but not without potentially detrimental side effects that leave the body distressed and fatigued.  New therapies are being developed to specifically target cancerous cells in order to have safer and more efficient treatments.

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Eleanor Fausold '13
New York Times Publishes Fausold '13 Letter

Eleanor Fausold ’13 penned a letter to the editor that was published in The New York Times in response to an op-ed titled “Is It Time to Bag the Plastic?” Referencing her senior thesis research on the costs and benefits of charging a fee for both paper and plastic bags in New York City, Fausold answered the article’s title question with, “The answer is overwhelmingly yes!” The letter appeared on the publication’s website on the day she graduated from Hamilton, May 26, and in print on the following day.  More ...

Members of the Class of 2013 who were initiated to associate membership in Sigma Xi.
Sigma Xi Initiates 18 New Associate Members

The Hamilton College Chapter of Sigma Xi, the scientific research society, initiated 18 members of the Class of 2013 to associate membership at the annual banquet in the Taylor Science Center Atrium on May 24.  More ...

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