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Yonghyun Song '13
Song '13 Charts Graph Theory

The mathematical field of graph theory is a study of just that:  a study of mathematical figures consisting of points and lines connected to them. Yonghyun Song ’13 is serving as an intern for Associate Professor of Mathematics Sally Cockburn on a graph theory project. His work was supported by the Monica Odening Student Internship and Research Fund in Mathematics through the Career Center.  More ...

Robert Hayden '14, Christopher Rider '12, Leah Cairns '13, Victoria  Bogen '14, Akritee Shrestha '13.
Students Seek Solution to Peptide Structure

Piscidin is an antimicrobial peptide found in hybrid striped bass which binds to cell membranes in order to destroy them. Victoria Bogen ’14, Robert Hayden ’14, Akritee Shrestha ’13, Leah Cairns ’13 and Christopher Rider ’12 are working with Associate Professor of Chemistry Myriam Cotten to conduct research on piscidin. Their research aims to solve the peptide’s structure and behavior in various conditions.  More ...

Daniel Feinberg, Bethany O'Meara, Matthew Combs, Dilyana Mihaylova, Ana Fernandez-Menjivar
Bio. Researchers Map Unwelcome Visitors in Glens

Hamilton’s Kirkland and Rogers glens offer beautiful forest paths for joggers, dog-walkers and nature lovers. Hidden within the lush greenery, a well-trained eye can spot several plant species growing there that aren’t native to the glens. Invasive plant species in forests have the potential to interfere with native plants and animals, as well as disrupt the microbial balance of the soil. Five biology students and Professor Bill Pfitsch are mapping these unwelcome visitors in a summer research project.  More ...

Tani Leigh '12
Building a Better Tree

By organizing all eukaryotic species into groups and depicting their evolution in a tree-like structure, researchers shape a better understanding of how different sets of organisms relate to one another and how they evolved. However beneficial these trees might be, there is some debate as to which genetic markers should serve as the trees’ organizing principle, as well as which method of grouping should be utilized. Tani Leigh ’12 is working with Assistant Professor of Biology Wei-Jen Chang this summer to create a new version of the eukaryotic phylogenetic tree using ribosomal proteins.  More ...

Diane Paverman '13, Spencer Gulbronson '12, Matthew Farrington '12.
Students Track Frustration, Fear and Suspicion in Computer Use

Hamilton students and faculty are working with the U.S. Air Force this summer on a project that measures the neurological responses to fear, frustration and suspicion of humans as they interact with computers.  More ...

Aaron Danilack '13, Professor Robin Kinnel and Jeffrey Blackburn '13.
Students Synthesize Newly-Discovered Molecule

Chemistry Professor Robin Kinnel has recently discovered the chemical compound dichlorobouillonamide, which is released by a cyanobacteria in the Lyngbya family. The chemical has never been studied in depth, and it is possible that dichlorobouillonamide has potential applications in pain treatment. This summer Aaron Danilack ’13 and Jeffrey Blackburn ’13 are working with Kinnel to carry out a laboratory synthesis of dichlorobouillonamide.  More ...

Kadahj Bennett '12
Bennett '12 Delves Into Black Male Identity

Societal pressures shape the way in which many young people develop into adulthood. In fact, cultural norms are so ubiquitous that there are few examples of people who truly break the mold. Kadahj Bennett ’12, an Emerson Summer Grant recipient, is working with Associate Professor of Theater Mark Cryer to create an interdisciplinary, innovative street theater performance piece, Letters to the Shadows in the Sky, on the male black identity in modern society.  More ...

Melanie Hundt '13, Max Vaickus '12 and Nicole Nietlisbach '13
Model Organisms Give Insight to Human Biology

When working with human afflictions such as hypothyroidism and diabetes, researchers find it beneficial to study model organisms that can exhibit the same conditions. Animals such as mice and turtles, for example, can provide insight about the biological traits and medical conditions they share with humans. This summer Melanie Hundt ’13, Nicole Nietlisbach ’13 and Max Vaickus ’12 examined hypothyroidism and diabetes in mice and tested for the hormone ghrelin in turtles. The students worked with Professor of Biology David Gapp.  More ...

Alvin Wu '13, Carmen Montagnon '13, Dan Mermelstein '14.
Chemistry Students Present at MERCURY Conference

Over the weekend of July 29,  Dan Mermelstein’14, Carmen Montagnon ’13 and Alvin Wu ’13 presented their research at the 10th Molecular Educational Research Consortium in Undergraduate Computational chemistRY (MERCURY) conference at Bucknell University. The three students have been working this summer in the laboratory of Assistant Professor of Chemistry Adam Van Wynsberghe.  More ...

Christopher Richardson '14 and Kevin Boettger '13
Recycled Enzymes

Enzymes serve as catalysts to many biological processes, and so they are not used up in reactions and they may be recovered and reused. However, in a laboratory setting, reactions involving enzymes can leave the enzyme unrecoverable. Kevin Boettger ’13 and Christopher Richardson ’14 are spending the summer working under Professor of Chemistry Tim Elgren to trap enzymes in Sol gels, making them more stable and recyclable. Their project is titled “Encapsulation of Enzymes.”  More ...

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