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Caitlin Taborda '11 in the Woollcott kitchen.
Senior Fellow Caitlin Taborda Studying Food Movements

Caitlin Taborda, Hamilton’s only Senior Fellow for the class of 2011, has begun her research on American food movements with regard to how different people make choices about the food they eat. Her project is titled “Local, Organic, and Sustainable Privilege: Understanding the Social Significance of Food Movements and the Socioeconomic Factors that Influence Participation.”  More ...

Kelly Fitzsimmons '10 and Visiting Assistant Professor of Biology Ashleigh Smythe
Smythe and Fitzsimmons ’10 Present at Parasitology Conference

Visiting Assistant Professor of Biology Ashleigh Smythe and Kelly Fitzsimmons ’10 recently presented papers at the Helminthological Society of Washington meeting in Washington, D.C. The Helminthological Society is the oldest parasitology society in the U.S. and this meeting coincided with the Society’s 100th anniversary.  More ...

Caitlin Burzynski ’12, Nina Kraus ’13,  Prof. Cotten, and Alex Dao ’12.
Cotten and Students Work at National High Magnetic Field Lab

Associate Professor of Chemistry Myriam Cotten and her team of Hamilton students spent 10 days this summer at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in Tallahassee, Fla., to study piscidin, antimicrobial peptides from fish. The team, comprised of Caitlin Burzynski ’12, Nina Kraus '13, Cotten, and Alex Dao ’12, used several state-of-the-art Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) instruments to obtain atomic-level information on samples of piscidin bound to lipid bilayers that mimic bacterial membranes.  More ...

DSJP to Host Annual Student-Faculty Conference
Debra Richardson, program director of the Utica Culinary Institute, will give the keynote speech at Hamilton's Diversity and Social Justice Project (DSJP) student-faculty conference that will take place on Sept. 23-24. She will give a talk titled, “Food Justice: Food as the Vehicle for Connecting Communities” on Thursday, Sept. 23, at 4:10 p.m., in the Red Pit, Kirner-Johnson Building. The conference is free and open to the public. More ...
Jenn Santoro '11 inserts samples into the "dirt burner."
Jennifer Santoro ’11 Conducts Summer Research at Tulane
Environmental studies major Jennifer Santoro '11 explored another avenue of science when she did organic geochemistry research at Tulane University this summer. She worked under the direction of Dr. Brad Rosenheim at Tulane, with the support of an NSF Office of Polar Programs (LARISSA) grant to Eugene Domack, Hamilton’s J.W. Johnson Family Professor of Geosciences. More ...
Graepel '11, Adams '11 and Snyder
Snyder, Adams '11 and Graepel '11 Work on GBM Vaccine
Under the guidance of Assistant Professor of Chemistry Nicole Snyder, Taylor Adams ’11 and Kevin Graepel ’11 spent the summer working on the development of a carbohydrate-based vaccine for glioblastoma multiforme, the most aggressive type of primary brain tumor. More ...
Arielle Cutler '11
The Media's Effect on Women's Body Image

While women have made significant strides in the past decades, the culture at large continues to place a great emphasis on how women look. These beauty standards, largely proliferated through the media, have drastic impacts on young women and their body images. Arielle Cutler ’11, through a Levitt grant, spent the summer evaluating the efficacy of media literacy programs as a remedy to this vicious cycle.  More ...

Lexi Nisita '12
Nisita '12 Examines Emilie du Châtelet's Influence on Feminism
To modern-day feminists, the canon of authors and thinkers who contributed to the movement are well known and oft-repeated; Woolf, Gilbert and Gubar and de Beauvoir are a few. But Lexi Nisita ’12, in conjunction with an Emerson grant, is seeking to add one more name to this list: Emilie du Châtelet, a philosopher better known as Voltaire’s longtime companion.
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Theresa Allinger '11 examines a 450-year-old deep water coral specimen.
Allinger '11 Examines Deep Sea Corals
Deep Sea corals grow very slowly and hence contain a record of changing oceanographic conditions over time. This summer Theresa Allinger '11 is conducting a geochemical analysis of these deep water corals from Antarctica that grew at 1500 feet below the surface of the Ross Sea. More ...
Stevie Brandon '11
Revolutionary Medicine and the Medical Revolution
The French Revolution is truly one of the most idealized and glorified events in French history, having transformed the then-archaic governmental structure into one that fit with more modern values. But Stevie Brandon ’11, advised by Professor of History Esther Kanipe and supported by an Emerson grant, is analyzing an oft-ignored hierarchy that the Revolution changed forever: the French medical system.
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