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Tawanda Mashavave '10
Tawanda Mashavave ’10 Analyzes Number Theory in Summer Research
One plus one is undoubtedly two. One times one is indubitably one. But what happens when you put a whole string of these simple calculations together? That is what Tawanda Mashavave ’10 researched this summer. His project was designated as computer science research, but it was geared more toward number theory. With Professor of Computer Science Richard Decker, Mashavave analyzed integer complexity: the integer complexity of a positive integer n, denoted by c(n), is the least amount of 1s used to represent n using only additions, multiplications, and parentheses. More ...
Xiaohan Du '12 with April Oswald, Museum Education Director of Munson-Williams-Proctor Arts Institute.
Xiaohan Du ’12 Brings U.S. Art Museums’ Educational Ideas to China
Xiaohan Du ’12 is proud of her Chinese culture, but has some qualms about its philosophy on education, especially in museums. “The Chinese people don’t get enough from the museums as they should,” she said. Du describes the labels and audio guides that resemble those in American museums, but also mentions that there is a staggering lack of activity outside of these merely informative aides. “It’s pretty passive,” she noted. This summer, she did a comparison of American and Chinese educational methods in art museums. Her research was funded by the Emerson Foundation Grant program, which was created in 1997 to bolster student-faculty relations through collaborative research projects.
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Allie Hutchison '10 and Lisa Feuerstein '10
Kimberlites of Central New York Are Focus of Summer Research
Hamilton graduate Oren Root (1803-1885) was the first to find igneous, volcanic rocks known as kimberlites in New York State. In 1881, he retired as Professor Emeritus of Mathematics, Mineralogy and Geology at Hamilton, and left a legacy of sage and introspective research for future students and faculty to imitate. This summer, Alexandra Hutchison ’10 and Lisa Feuerstein ’10 are expanding on the study of kimberlites across Central New York and the eastern states. They are working with Associate Professor of Geosciences David Bailey to determine why kimberlites exist in certain places and where they came from. Their projects have slightly different aims, but both revolve around the effort to discern the more reliable theories from those with not enough evidence. More ...
Yinghan Ding '12 (right) with his advisor Margaret Morgan-Davie.
Yinghan Ding ’12 Charts Ups and Downs of Airline Ticket Prices
Yinghan Ding ’12 is an international student at Hamilton, and so are some of his friends. When it comes time to head home for winter break, they might want to heed his advice about buying airline tickets.  By the end of the summer, Ding will be practically an expert on the topic. In the spring, he received an Emerson Grant to study price fluctuations in the airline industries. Because the Airline Deregulation Act of 1978 eliminated most of the U.S. government’s interference in the economic standing of airlines, Ding is curious to see whether or not the government needs to become reacquainted with airline regulation in order to achieve stable prices that will benefit both consumers and the industry. More ...
Caroline Davis '11 and Laura Gault 11
Students Strive to Improve Health Care in Tanzania
The debate over health care is not solely bound to the United States. Neither is it confined to migration via land – medicinal issues wash ashore on continents like Africa. In the spring, Caroline Davis ’11 and Laura Gault ’11 were awarded a Davis Peace Project Fellowship program grant amounting to $10,000. They spent it on a research project titled “Empowering the Hadzabe as Agents of Peace: Health for Cultural Preservation.” Its goal to devise a strategy to improve healthcare in the Hadzabe communities of Tanzania. They believe promise lies therein for mobile health care labs and improved ambulatory care during pregnancy complications. More ...
Matt Russell ’11 Programs Comp. Sci. Editing Tool
A written assignment can be deceiving. Even if the finished product is immaculate, the student might have put in many hours of work in order to get it to that point. On the other hand, holes in a student’s argument indicate that he either rushed through that portion of his analysis or toiled over its synthesis for longer than necessary. Matt Russell ’11 sees this as a problem for educators who are trying to help their students understand classroom material. If they cannot see what areas on which their students are spending an inordinate amount of time, they cannot help them improve. This summer, Russell worked with Associate Professor of Computer Science Mark Bailey to design a computer program that will visually represent the time spent on certain aspects of computer programming. 
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 Isabelle Cannell ’11 and Natalie Elking '12
Students Seek Alternative Energy Source in Chile
The Patagonia region of Chile has some of the highest wind potentials in the world, peaking at nearly 200,000 megawatts of power and sweeping by at five or 10 meters per second. Natalie Elking ’12 and Isabelle Cannell ’11 began to develop an interest in this obvious but overlooked source of energy after writing a group paper on what they believed was the proper approach to wilderness conservation in Patagonia. J. W. Johnson Family Professor of Geosciences Eugene Domack taught the course, and expressed interest in editing their paper and trying to get it published. As the topic moved more into the realm of wind and tidal power issues, Domack suggested a trip to Chile to investigate the matter. Elking and Cannell agreed, and enthusiastically accompanied him this past May. More ...
John Dunn '10 and Hamilton rugby alum Rezaan Daniels '07.
Rugby: Sport or Means of Political Reconciliation?
Who knew sports could be so academic? John Dunn ’10 did. This summer, he studied the political and social symbolism of rugby in post-apartheid South Africa. He believes that rugby has served as a means of political reconciliation in recent years through conflict resolution and racial integration. Dunn wanted to investigate the legitimacy of the African National Congress’s claim that rugby is an emblem for national unity. His project was funded through the Levitt Research Fellows Program, which is open to students who wish to collaborate with faculty members on intensive research projects related to public affairs. Dunn’s advisor for the summer was Associate Professor of History Kevin Grant. More ...
Billy Wieczorek '11
Billy Wieczorek ‘11 Evaluates Piscidin-3’s Ability to Fight Infection
Piscidins are potent biological substances. Classified as antimicrobial peptides, they naturally fight off infection in organisms like the hybrid striped bass, among others. There are four members of the family of piscidins that Billy Wieczorek ’11 is studying this summer. Piscidin-1 has been the subject of myriad other studies, and although it has many antimicrobial properties, it can be harmful to human blood cells because it cannot differentiate between bacterial and mammalian cells. More ...
Clair Cassiello '11
Can the Eyes Reveal a Person's Prejudices?
When Clair Cassiello ’11 was younger, she wanted to work for the FBI. The psychological twists excited her – she liked that criminal investigators sometimes analyze how a person thinks as opposed to what crime he has actually committed. Although her ambitions have changed, she still is interested in the profound effect the mind has on actions. This summer, Cassiello is learning more about psychology through an eye-tracking bias project with Visiting Professor of Psychology Mark Oakes.
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