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Himeka Hagiwara '11
Digging Deep into the Brain and the Mind
When it comes to the mind and the body, we live immersed in two opposing viewpoints. While many of us believe in the power of science and the firing neurons of the brain that account for many of our actions, we continue attributing our sensations and thoughts to a separate concept of the “mind,” an abstract entity only loosely connected to the physical body. Working with John Stewart Kennedy Professor of Philosophy Richard Werner and through an Emerson grant, Himeka Hagiwara ’11 is exploring the mind-body dichotomy and the conflicting perspectives that are so prominent in our culture. More ...
Leonard Teng '12
Finding Order in Chaos
To the average person, chaos is a concept that lacks any form of organization or order. In everyday language, chaos can mean disaster, tumult or lawlessness. But to a physicist, chaos is just another form of complex behavior. This summer, Leonard Teng ’12 is working to perfect an apparatus developed by Litchfield Professor of Physics Peter Millet and Director of Laboratories/Head Technician Jim Schreve that allows the user to better calculate and demonstrate the properties of chaotic motion. More ...
Shahin Islam '12, Suman Sarker '11 and Barsha Baral '13.
Group Looks at Genetics to Categorize Nematodes
Fever, coughing, vomiting, diarrhea: all of these are symptoms of parasite infestation. Nematodes are one of the most common types of human, animal and plant parasites. Not all nematodes are parasitic and not all parasites are nematodes, but these microscopic creatures are part of one of the most diverse phyla on the planet. Suman Sarker ’11, Barsha Baral ’13 and Shahin Islam ’12 working under Assistant Professor of Biology Wei-Jen Chang and Visiting Assistant Professor of Biology Ashleigh Smythe, are looking at genetics to more thoroughly categorize nematodes. More ...
Kate Otley '12
Otley ’12 Discovers the Challenges of Synthesizing Molecules
Deep in the bowels of the Science Center, Assistant Professor of Chemistry Camille Y. Jones labored away at the project that has become her White Whale: unlocking the secrets of the clathrate hydrates (molecules that form cage-like structures around various guest molecules). But as she ran the spectroscopy on the clathrates, she found the resulting spectra to be extremely complex—too complex to be interpreted. In order to facilitate Jones’ research, Kate Otley ’12, working under Associate Professor of Chemistry Ian Rosenstein, is spending her summer replacing some of the troublesome hydrogen atoms with its isotope, deuterium. More ...
Kate Arpino '10
2010 Graduates Present Posters at Dynamic Processes Conference

Andrew Beyler and Kate Arpino, both members of the class of 2010 and chemical physics majors, presented their senior thesis research at the 17th International Conference on Dynamic Processes in Excited States of Solids. It took place at Argonne National Laboratory near Chicago from June 20-25 and had 130 attendees.  More ...

Pauline Wafula '13, Kristen Pallen '12,  Lennox Chitsike '13 and Aaron Danilack '13.
Uncovering the Mysterious Behavior of Clathrates
A group of Hamilton summer science researchers are studying ice-like compounds known as methane clathrates, cage-like structures of water molecules that form around a guest molecule. As the quest for alternative energy sources continues, scientists and engineers are exploring new options, and methane clathrates are a distinct possibility. More ...
Jeffrey Cardoni '11
Boom and Bust: the Travails of the U.S. Auto Industry
The U.S. auto industry has caused some anxiety in these tumultuous economic times. The government takeover of General Motors in 2009 was a concrete indication of earlier warning signs of the industry’s problems; meanwhile Ford Motors has been able to avoid bankruptcy. Working under Henry Platt Bristol Professor of International Affairs Alan Cafruny and through a Levitt Center grant, Jeffrey Cardoni ’11 is investigating the business practices of Ford and GM that caused the two companies to succeed and fail respectively. More ...
Eyjafjallajökull in Iceland.
Field Study in Iceland
For a country with a population smaller than that of Wyoming, Iceland drew a lot of attention this spring when a more typically dormant volcano erupted and brought European air travel to a stop. Over the next two weeks, several Hamilton students will be able to observe for themselves this spectacular country and its many unique geologic features. More ...
Mary Meinke '12, Clair Cassiello '11 and Lauren Liebman '12.
Student Research Group Designing ADHD Assessment
Working under Professor of Psychology Penny Yee, Clair Cassiello ’11, Lauren Liebman ’12 and Mary Meinke ’12 are designing a more reliable and accurate study to better assess the characteristics and behaviors associated with ADHD in adults. More ...
Joseph Lobel '13
Joseph Lobel ’13 Tracks Mysterious Jumping Genes
In the DNA of every cell in your body, segments of DNA are constantly jumping and shifting locations. These jumping segments are called transposons and they usually contain the building blocks for genes, but do not provide your body with blueprints like regular genes. But in a group of microorganisms called ciliated protists, some types of transposons (called Telomere-Bearing Element, or TBE, transposons) do contain genes, and they are sometimes even expressed. Working under Assistant Professor of Biology Wei-Jen Chang, Joseph Lobel ’13 is spending his summer trying to detect and sequence these elusive, mobile genes. More ...
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