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Eren Shultz '15 in the Pare Mountains, posing with the board members of the Gonja Sub-Kume Water Cooperative.
Eren Shultz ’15 Studied Cooperative Agriculture in Africa in Levitt Research

Economists explain that a fundamental problem in our world is that resources are finite, and this is especially true for developing countries that lack the most basic resources necessary for survival.  According to the World Bank, more than 80 percent of poor Tanzanians live in rural areas and have limited access to arable land, water, food and tools.  In his project funded by the Arthur Levitt Public Affairs Center, Eren Shultz '15 researched development in Tanzania to understand the current and future roles of cooperative organizations.  More ...

Mandy Wong '15
Mandy Wong ’15 Examines Fuzhounese Student Perspectives on Higher Education

The Gaokao, also known as the National College Entrance Exam, is a Chinese academic examination that students must complete to apply to undergraduate schools.  Chinese schools prepare children for the grueling exam that determines if the children will pursue an education at highly competitive universities or end their formal education and enter the workforce.  In her project funded by the Arthur Levitt Public Affairs Center, Mandy Wong ’15 researched Chinese student perspectives on obtaining a higher education after passing the Gaokao.  More ...

Maggie Haag '15, left, teaches English to refugees at Conkling School in Utica.
Hamilton Student Teaches Literacy Via Technology

Utica has the fourth highest concentration of refugees of all cities in the United States. Many of these immigrants struggle to adjust to American culture and language. Through a Kirkland Summer Associate project, Maggie Haag ’15 is trying new ways to use technology to teach refugees English and help them to understand American culture.  More ...

Hillary Norris '13
Egg Donor Programs: What Are We Worth?

Young, educated women such as those who attend Hamilton College are the target demographic of many egg donor programs. This summer, Hillary Norris ’15 is asking why. Through her Kirkland Summer Associate project, “What Are We Worth?” she is analyzing the criteria that fertility centers and prospective parents use to select egg donors. Her topic leads to complex questions about discrimination and what our society values.  More ...

Jorett Joseph '15 sorts donated books and belts for the orphanage she's working with in Haiti.
Jorett Joseph ’15 Seeks to Recognize Black Women’s Accomplishments

In history books, the accomplishments of black women are among those most underrepresented. Through her Emerson Foundation project this summer, Jorett Joseph ’15 aims to research and recognize the efforts of black women who have promoted justice within their communities.  More ...

Nick Brewer '14
Nick Brewer ’14 Researches People's Ability to Detect Lies

Recent studies have found that the average American lies 11 times a week.  It is, of course, possible to tell a lie that goes undetected or, alternatively, to be accused of lying when innocent.  With the help of Stuart Hirshfield, the Stephen Harper Kirner Professor of Computer Sciences, Nick Brewer ’14 is researching how well people detect lies and accept truths.  More ...

John DeGuardi '16 isolates isotopes to determine the age of a black shale sample.
John DeGuardi ’16 Analyzes Black Shale

John DeGuardi ’16 is a chemistry major but spent two months this summer working out the age of Woody Island Siltstone, an unusual black shale found in Tasmania, Australia. He and Adrien Hilmy ’13 were awarded a Dickson-Rodgers summer research stipend and worked in a high tech laboratory at the University of Houston.  More ...

Nathaniel Lanman '15
Abandoned Utica School is Inspiration for Collaborative Project

An abandoned building can hold many memories, and Utica’s Theodore Roosevelt Elementary School may hold more than most. Since closing in 1992, the school has stood in disrepair, but people in the surrounding area still have strong memories of its role in the community.  With funding from the Emerson Foundation, Nathaniel Lanman ‘15 is compiling a collection of creative writing about the school, which a group of students will later use in writing a script for a theater performance.  More ...

Jacob Davidson '15, left, and Andrew Morrison '14.
Physics Students Engaged in National Research Project

Four fundamental forces - gravity, electricity, the strong force and the weak force - control all of the subatomic interactions that exist in our universe. The strong force dictates interactions between molecules in a nucleus while the weak force governs the process of radioactive decay.  The scientific community currently understands the first three forces well, but obtaining knowledge about the weak force has challenged physics researchers for decades. Andrew Morrison ’14 and Jacob Davidson ’15 are contributing to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) aCORN Project, to gain a better understanding of the weak force.  More ...

Adriana Fracchia '14
The Fall of Greece and the Rise of the Golden Dawn

Adriana Fracchia ’14 spent last summer in Pachio Amos, Greece, assisting in an archaeological excavation and producing topographical maps of the site, an ancient village on the island of Crete. While in Greece, her interest was piqued in the Golden Dawn, a controversial political group. This summer she's researching the rising power of the Golden Dawn.  More ...

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