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Eva Hunt '11
Exploring Art as Therapy
Pablo Picasso once said, “Art washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life.” This summer, Eva Hunt ’11 is discovering how art is used cathartically, but for some heavier dust than Picasso’s; through internships with Project Create and The Smith Farm Center, Hunt is learning that art can be therapeutic for children and adults. More ...
Olivia Wolfgang-Smith '11
A Summer in the Slush Pile
For Olivia Wolfgang-Smith ’11, the “slush pile” of unsolicited manuscripts is only barely a metaphor. Working at the literary magazine The Missouri Review, Wolfgang-Smith pores over 30 manuscripts per week, evaluating their quality. With an Emerson grant and guidance from Associate Professor of English Tina Hall, Wolfgang-Smith is learning the production process of a highly-respected literary magazine. More ...
Jesica Lindor '12
Deconstructing the Pursuit of Happiness
Despite the constant quest to live a happy life, people in today’s complicated world are finding happiness increasingly elusive. Past philosophers have proposed how to be happy, but each suggestion is radically different. Advised by John Stewart Kennedy Professor of Philosophy Richard Werner, Jesica Lindor ’12 is analyzing philosophies on happiness through modern psychology through an Emerson grant. More ...
Danielle Lashley '13
Lashley '13 Seeks to Clone Fruit Flies
Armed with her pipette and sterile gloves, Danielle Lashley ’13 carefully transfers the solution from her test tube to the petri dishes in front of her. But the solution she so cautiously maneuvers is store-bought Juicy Juice, used to attract flies so she can work with their embryos. Lashley is attempting to clone and catalog the development of two gap genes of the common fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, in embryos. More ...
Adam Vorcheimer '11, K. Blake Darcy '78 and Anne Vilsoet '11.
Darcy '78 Paves Way to World of Investing for Hamilton Interns
The world of investing is notoriously competitive, often characterized as a dog-eat-dog, cutthroat scramble to the top. But Hamilton trustee K. Blake Darcy ’78 has shown that companies work better when alliances are strong; he has hired two Hamilton students, Adam Vorchheimer ’11 and Anne Vilsoet ’11, as interns at his growing investment firm Formula Investing. More ...
Cameron Breslin '11
Breslin '11 Documents Ethnography Through Film
Long thought to be the most objective of artistic mediums, film is slowly being acknowledged as subjective, the camera impacting its subject matter like in any other art. In conjunction with an Emerson grant and advised by Visiting Professor of Art History Scott MacDonald, Cameron Breslin ’11 is analyzing early ethnographic documentaries to determine how accurately and objectively they portrayed their anthropological subject. More ...
Loren Ormeo '11
Ormeo ’11 is an Angel in the Kitchen
Chopping vegetables, cooking meats and mixing dressings, Loren Ormeo ’11 is occupied with cooking a large meal. But instead of just cooking for her friends or family, Ormeo cooks for the needy: those whose life-threatening illnesses prevent them from shopping and cooking themselves. With support from the Summer Internship Support Fund through the Career Center, Ormeo is working with Project Angel Food in Los Angeles. More ...
Kate Harloe '12
Harloe ’12 Hunts the Roots of Hinduism
Observed from the West, Hinduism appears as a complex, heterogeneous, polytheistic amalgamation of religious practices. But just below its multifaceted interior lies a concept that Westerners understand only too well: the control of colonization. Through an Emerson grant and the guidance of Associate Professor of History Lisa Trivedi, Kate Harloe ’12 will spend the summer investigating the roots of Hinduism as well as its contemporary incarnations in Indian society. More ...
Jason McGavin '12
McGavin ‘12 Studying Destructive Protein Piscidin
Jason McGavin ’12 observes the organic balls that seem to be bleeding dye into the surrounding liquid. But what caused the destruction? In this microscopic game of Space Invaders, it is the destructive entity that is the aggressor: piscidins, a type of bacteria-killing protein found in fish. McGavin is looking at two specific piscidins and attempting to relate their destructive function to their chemical structure. More ...
Carolyn Dopp '11, Liz Chapin '12 and Danielle Mortarano '12.
Psych Researchers Measure Relational Aggression
Rapidly becoming a cult classic, Mean Girls gives its viewers more than a wildly entertaining movie experience: it offers a front row seat to the effects of relational aggression. Initially thought to be present mostly in middle- and high-school girls, relational aggression has been found in almost all demographics. Working under Professors of Psychology Gregory Pierce and Penny Yee, Liz Chapin ’12, Carolyn Dopp ’11 and Danielle Mortorano ’12 have been testing new ways to measure relational aggression. More ...
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