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Pauline Wafula '13, Kristen Pallen '12,  Lennox Chitsike '13 and Aaron Danilack '13.
Uncovering the Mysterious Behavior of Clathrates
A group of Hamilton summer science researchers are studying ice-like compounds known as methane clathrates, cage-like structures of water molecules that form around a guest molecule. As the quest for alternative energy sources continues, scientists and engineers are exploring new options, and methane clathrates are a distinct possibility. More ...
Jeffrey Cardoni '11
Boom and Bust: the Travails of the U.S. Auto Industry
The U.S. auto industry has caused some anxiety in these tumultuous economic times. The government takeover of General Motors in 2009 was a concrete indication of earlier warning signs of the industry’s problems; meanwhile Ford Motors has been able to avoid bankruptcy. Working under Henry Platt Bristol Professor of International Affairs Alan Cafruny and through a Levitt Center grant, Jeffrey Cardoni ’11 is investigating the business practices of Ford and GM that caused the two companies to succeed and fail respectively. More ...
Mary Meinke '12, Clair Cassiello '11 and Lauren Liebman '12.
Student Research Group Designing ADHD Assessment
Working under Professor of Psychology Penny Yee, Clair Cassiello ’11, Lauren Liebman ’12 and Mary Meinke ’12 are designing a more reliable and accurate study to better assess the characteristics and behaviors associated with ADHD in adults. More ...
Joseph Lobel '13
Joseph Lobel ’13 Tracks Mysterious Jumping Genes
In the DNA of every cell in your body, segments of DNA are constantly jumping and shifting locations. These jumping segments are called transposons and they usually contain the building blocks for genes, but do not provide your body with blueprints like regular genes. But in a group of microorganisms called ciliated protists, some types of transposons (called Telomere-Bearing Element, or TBE, transposons) do contain genes, and they are sometimes even expressed. Working under Assistant Professor of Biology Wei-Jen Chang, Joseph Lobel ’13 is spending his summer trying to detect and sequence these elusive, mobile genes. More ...
Scott Regan '11 Explores Law Through Internship
Internships, whether paid or unpaid, are often the ideal option for Hamilton students seeking to gain experience in professional fields over the summer months. Hamilton’s Scott Regan ’11 was fortunate enough to find, through HamNet, a summer internship in a field that interests him. Regan will spend this summer as an intern in the offices of Merrimack Valley Legal Services, a law office based in Massachusetts. More ...
Christopher Rider ’12, Whitney Bachow ’13 and Fallon Chipidza ’10.
Taking the Lay of the Land in Green Lake
Located less than an hour away from Hamilton’s campus, Green Lakes State Park can provide a relaxing day of sun and swimming for the casual tourist. But for many scientists who visit Green Lake, the trip is full of investigation and sampling; the lake is meromictic, meaning that the layers in the lake do not mix with one another. More ...
Members of the research group studying blue lupine.
Researchers Seek Ways to Bring Back Frosted Elfin Butterfly
The Frosted Elfin is not much to look at. It is a small, brownish butterfly whose unspectacular markings help it blend in against the backdrop of bark and dead leaves and grasses in its natural habitat in the Rome Sand Plains. The elfin, however, is an essential part of a fragile ecosystem and its numbers, recently, are decreasing. Five Hamilton students—Dan Bruzzese ’12, Eddie Williams ’12, Jonathan Pinney ’11, Chloe Von Ancken ‘11 and Mary Lehner ’12—along with Associate Professor of Biology Bill Pfitsch, are spending the summer doing field work for a project called “Restoration Ecology of Common Blue Lupine in the Rome Sand Plains” to find out why the frosted elfin is disappearing and how to get it back. More ...
Sam Briggs '12 and Beril Esen '13
Sam Briggs '12 and Beril Esen '13 Investigate Defensive Self-Esteem
Imagine looking through a series of portraits and being asked to observe the faces of each one. What if suddenly you saw your own face on the screen? How would you react? According to Sam Briggs ’12 and Beril Esen ’13, a lot of that reaction depends on how you feel about yourself. More ...
Jacob Sheetz-Willard
Jacob Sheetz-Willard '12 Tackles Hudson River in Emerson Project
The mission of the Hudson River Sloop Clearwater, a nonprofit corporation headed by folk artist and cultural icon Pete Seeger, is to protect the waters of the Hudson River from pollution and degradation. This summer, Emerson Fellow Jacob Sheetz-Willard ’12 is researching how Pete Seeger’s Clearwater movement transcends environmental activism and becomes a cultural movement similar in organization to the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s.  More ...
Anna Hagstrom (Amherst '13), Erica Losito '12 and Jeremy Adelman '13.
Simulating Unpredictable Movements of the Influenza Virus

In 1918, the global influenza pandemic struck millions of families, killing a jaw-dropping 3 percent of the world’s population at the time. Scientists since devised a treatment to stop the flu infection from spreading within the body. With the recent emergence of a particularly virulent strain of avian influenza, H5N1, and the rise of the highly transmissible but somewhat less virulent pandemic H1N1 “swine flu” in 2009, many fear a repeat of this serious and lethal world health crisis. The common drugs used for treatment of influenza are far from perfect, and they sometimes act in unexpected ways on the molecular level. Working with Assistant Professor of Chemistry Adam Van Wynsberghe, Erica Losito ’12 and Jeremy Adelman ’13 are taking a closer look at exactly what happens when the virus and the drug interact, in two different ways.  More ...

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