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Students in the New York City Program visit Federal Hall.
New York City Program Group Tours Wall Street
Hamilton students in the New York City Program started off their semester with a tour of Wall Street. Alan Cafruny, the Henry Platt Bristol Professor of International Affairs, is director of this semester’s program, International Political Economy. More ...
Researchers at the Rome Sand Plain.
Students and Faculty Join Forces for Summer Research
More than 100 Hamilton students spent a portion of their summer conducting research with faculty. In the labs and the libraries, in fields and on the water, students and faculty explored such topics as bacterial diversity in nearby Green Lake, contemporary Indian cinema and regulations in the U.S. airline industry. Read more about their projects. More ...
Sam Cho '10 and Adam Van Wynsberghe
New Chemistry Prof. and Hamilton Junior Collaborate in UCSD Lab
Newly hired Assistant Professor of Chemistry Adam Van Wynsberghe became acquainted with Hamilton College before he even arrived. This summer, he and Hamilton student Sam Cho ’10 participated in biophysical chemistry research at the University of California at San Diego (UCSD), where Van Wynsberghe was an NIH Kirschstein post-doctoral fellow. He says the experience was “good for both parties” in that while Cho familiarized himself with the sort of research that could consume his career after Hamilton, Van Wynsberghe became acclimated to the Hamilton community through Cho. 
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Nathaniel Taylor '11
Nathaniel Taylor '11 Studies Effectiveness of Alpha-Fetoprotein Peptides
Following pregnancy, women sometimes have a high concentration of what is known as alpha-fetoprotein, a protein found in blood plasma and produced in the yolk sac and liver during the fetal stage of development. Previous studies have shown that the alpha-fetoprotein has pronounced affects against breast cancer, and therefore women who have had multiple births might be less at risk. This summer Nathaniel Taylor ’11 looked at two sub-derivatives (small pieces) of alpha-fetoprotein, Peptides TPVNP and STPNVP to see if the properties they possess could be extracted for pharmaceutical purposes. He worked on the research with Silas D. Childs Professor of Chemistry Robin Kinnel. More ...
Kye Lippold '10 worked at the Bureau of Economics at the Federal Trade Commission
Summer Internships Provide Essential Career-Related Experience
It’s no surprise that 2009 college graduates are having a tough time finding jobs in the current economy. Surveys by the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) found that fewer than 20 percent of 2009 graduates who had applied for a job actually had one by the time of graduation, down from 26 percent in 2008, and more than 50 percent in 2007. More ...
Seniors Chelsea Stone, Ashley Chang and John Garrison in China.
Students Experience Rural China in ACC Field Studies Program
Hamilton students Ashley Chang ’10, Chelsea Stone ’10 and John Garrison ’10, along with 13 other students selected nationally, were awarded grants to participate in Associated Colleges in China (ACC) Field Studies program this summer. The program’s purpose was to help students who have previously studied abroad in a language-intensive program in China retain their high level of Chinese ability. It also aimed to help American students develop a better understanding of rural China and the China that is situated “outside of study-abroad programs.” For seniors Chang, Stone and Garrison, this seemed like a deal too good to be true. 
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Jiong Chen '10
Jiong Chen '10 Examines Digital Piracy in Levitt Research
China has long been criticized as a haven for piracy. The degree to which it exists there is so alarming that it would shiver ye timbers and condemn you straight to the depths of Davy Jones’ locker. At least, it would in the United States. But the kind of piracy that goes on in China is not usually discouraged, and is treated as a normal part of life. More than 90 percent of the Chinese population takes part in the search for the treasures of digital media culture, not gold. While citizens get much of their business software and electronic entertainment for free, their laid-back attitude has made piracy the number one issue for digital media companies that wish to make a profit. This summer Jiong Chen ’10 worked on a research project on the subject with Professor of Economics Elizabeth Jensen. More ...
Grace Liew '12
Grace Liew '12 Examines Paradigm Shift in Malaysian Politics
A few years ago, Grace Liew ’12 would have told you she had little interest in the politics of her native country. So it may come as a surprise that Grace spent her summer pursuing an Emerson Grant to investigate a paradigm shift in Malaysian politics. It was the trend of government itself that inspired Grace’s interest. In the 2008 elections, the leading party lost its majority, a new step for a nation that has not traditionally seen significant opposition in government. Liew’s research sought to examine the reasons for this development and to track its progress, aided by Professor of Philosophy Rick Werner. More ...
Will Bauder '10
Will Bauder ’10 Spends Summer on aCORN Project at Indiana University
The electroweak force describes the confluence of two fundamental forces in nature (out of four): the electromagnetic force, and the weak force. “Electroweak” is a funny sounding name to begin with, and “weak force” does not sound very scientific – but both are, in fact, complicated concepts in particle physics. The weak force alone governs beta decay and its associated radioactivity. But when combined with the electromagnetic force, it controls neutron beta decay. The aCORN project is an effort to more accurately measure the electron antineutrino correlation termed “little a,” one of the parameters for neutron beta decay. This summer, William Bauder ’10 worked on the aCORN project at Indiana University, which collaborates with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Professor of Physics Gordon Jones guided him through the research. More ...
Tawanda Mashavave '10
Tawanda Mashavave ’10 Analyzes Number Theory in Summer Research
One plus one is undoubtedly two. One times one is indubitably one. But what happens when you put a whole string of these simple calculations together? That is what Tawanda Mashavave ’10 researched this summer. His project was designated as computer science research, but it was geared more toward number theory. With Professor of Computer Science Richard Decker, Mashavave analyzed integer complexity: the integer complexity of a positive integer n, denoted by c(n), is the least amount of 1s used to represent n using only additions, multiplications, and parentheses. More ...
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