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New York City Program

Karen Prentice-Duprey
(on behalf of the Program Administrator and Directors)
315-859-4634

PROGRAM ADMINISTRATOR:
Christophre Georges, Professor of Economics
(315) 859-4472

PROGRAM DIRECTORS:
Erol Balkan (Director, Fall '14)
Patricia O'Neill (Director, Spr '15)
Chris Georges (Director, Fall '15)
Daniel Chambliss (Director, Spr '16)

Programs

Spring 2010

Philosophy and Globalization

Director: Rick Werner, John Stewart Kennedy Professor of Philosophy, Dept. of Philosophy (rwerner@hamilton.edu)

Prerequisites: None
 
College 398 Seminar in Global Processes: Philosophy and the Global City

Foundational course of the Program in New York City. Critical examination of some of the global issues and challenges considered from a philosophical perspective. Issues to include globalization, cosmopolitanism, war, genocide, humanitarian intervention, economic justice, overpopulation, famine, sustainability, pollution, resource depletion, and global warming. The course is organized around readings, class discussion, films, guest discussion leaders, and field trips in New York City.


College 396 Independent Study

A tutorial resulting in a substantial paper that integrates experience and learning from the internship with an academic perspective and knowledge gained in the seminars or other tutorial readings.


College 397 Internship

An Independent Study supervised by the director of the Program in New York City and based on an internship with a firm, organization, agency or advocacy group appropriate to the theme of course.


College 395 Special Topic: The Scope of our Commitments

Critical examination and weaving together of two distinct themes in contemporary global ethics: the question of the scope and reach of ethical responsibilities in an increasingly "flat" world, to borrow a phrase from Thomas Friedman, and of what our ethical responsibilities are more locally as in a global city like New York City. Are moral responsibilities global or local? Do we have equal moral responsibilities to all people or do we have special obligations to members of our own nation or local city dwellers or local community? Are we citizens of the world or merely of our nation or city or community?)

We will critically examine global issues and challenges from a philosophical perspective and especially topics relating to ethics, social, and political philosophy. Accepted students will receive two philosophy credits and two college credits for successful completion of the semester program.