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Residential Life

Residential Life
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First-Year Residential Programs

REAL Program

Residential Engagement in Academic Life (REAL) is a popular housing option open to 64 first-year students. Students live together on the 3rd and 4th floors of South residence hall and take one of four courses taught by Hamilton professors, who also serve as the students' faculty advisor. Through participation in the REAL program, first-year students have an opportunity to integrate their academic work and residential environment in a meaningful manner, and to connect immediately with their faculty member/advisor and classmates.

Fall 2014 REAL Program Courses – Class of 2018


PHIlosophy 100W: CRITICAL THINKING

Practical, hands-on work recognizing and constructing concise and powerful arguments from and in everyday life, on your feet, in debate, and in your writing. Useful in the classroom...and everywhere else. Includes lecture, discussion, and group presentations.
Taught by Katheryn Doran, Philosophy


ENGLISH 124w: tHE LITERARY ANIMAL

Humans have always been deeply interested in animals, and literature reflects this interest in many ways. We’ll examine the complexity of representing animals in literature by reading poetry, novels, and plays that reflect the human/animal divide, imagine being animal, or use animals as symbols. We’ll also discuss how these texts reveal philosophical and moral issues that arise from our relationships with animals. Texts include Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels, Shakespeare's The Tempest, London’s Call of the Wild, and Barbara Gowdy’s The White Bone. We’ll also read a range of poetry.
Taught by Onno Oerlemans, English


COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 143W:  LITERATURE ON TRIALS

Why are trials so fascinating? Our emphasis will be on the ways they clarify values, establishing borders between acceptable and unacceptable behavior, with attention to how they enforce cultural norms concerning race, gender, and sexuality. We will discuss literary and cultural representations of historical trials, such as those of Socrates, Joan of Arc, Galileo, the Salem Witches, and Oscar Wilde. Course materials to include readings from among the following:  Plato, Shaw, Brecht,  Kafka, Camus, Morrison, Wright as well as occasional films.
Taught by Nancy Rabinowitz, Comparative Literature


ARCHAEOLOGY 110: ARCHAEOLOGY OF HAMILTON'S FOUNDING

As an archaeological canvas, Hamilton College provides oral tradition, historical documents, and is a fascinating subject for archaeological inquiry. Its archaeological record on the lands it occupies within Northeastern North America can be peeled back in layers, focusing on both prehistoric and historic components from the first peoples in the area, the influence of Samuel Kirkland, and changes in the College over its history. Includes analysis of case studies from archaeological sites on campus, field trips to local historical societies, and use of College archives. 
Taught by Nathan Goodale, Anthropology

Course assignments will be made in the summer, based on student interest. Students selected for REAL will be assured registration in one of the four courses. Maximum enrollment for each course is 16 students. Courses marked with a "W" are writing intensive.


Questions?

Contact Meredith Bonham, Senior Associate Dean of Students

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