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Student Research

Undergraduate Research

Through independent projects, the Senior Program, and summer internships with faculty members, Hamilton provides an increasing number of opportunities for students to engage in significant — often publishable — research at the undergraduate level.

2015 Summer Research Participants >>

Recent News

From left; Steve Young, Pat Marris '16, Erin Lewis '18, David Dacres '18 and Prof. Adam Van Wynsberghe,
Hamilton Students Present at MERCURY Conference

Patrick Marris ’16, David Dacres ’18 and Erin Lewis’18 presented the results of their summer research projects during the 14th annual Molecular Educational Research Consortium in Undergraduate computational chemistRY (MERCURY) conference. The conference was held July 23-25 at Bucknell University.  More ...

Talia Vaughan '18 plays the AF-MATB game while researchers use cameras to collect data during the workload study.
Fortunato ’17, Sahlberg ’17 Seek to Improve Biometric Technologies

Computer science majors Jason Fortunato ’17 and Linnea Sahlberg ’17 are attempting to improve upon expensive biometric technologies this summer through a research project titled Remote Functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy. Working under Stephen Harper Kirner Chair of Computer Science Stuart Hirshfield, their research is focused on the creation of relatively unintrusive alternatives to Near Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) equipment, utilizing lasers to operate remotely instead of the common skin-contact reliant systems of traditional equipment.  More ...

Njideka Ofoleta ’16 Sheds Light on Women Emigrating from Africa to Spain

When Njideka Ofoleta ’16 studied abroad in Spain last semester, she noticed something about the population in her neighborhood. She lived in an area with a high immigrant population, and although she saw many African men in public and in the media, she saw few African women. She realized that African women were rarely discussed, and she “wanted to delve deeper into that rarely-covered realm.” With a grant from the Emerson Foundation, Ofoleta has spent time in Morocco, Spain, and the United States to research African women immigrating into Spain.  More ...

Tanapat (Ice) Treyanurak '17, right, tutors refugee Lucy Wang in ESL at BOCES Utica Access site.
Tanapat Treyanurak ’17 Continuing Work Related to Project SHINE Through Levitt Grant

While students, faculty, staff and visitors to Hamilton know that the Mohawk Valley is a beautiful and engaging place to live, another striking feature of the area is its position as a cultural and ethnic melting pot, thanks in large part to the City of Utica’s diverse refugee and immigrant populations. Tanapat Treyanurak ’17 is spending his summer continuing work related to Project SHINE, a program dedicated to assisting in the incorporation and assimilation of immigrants and refugees into local communities, through a Levitt Center grant.  More ...

Amber Torres '16
Amber Torres ’16 Works on “Selling the City” Through Emerson Project

Amber Torres ’16 is familiarizing herself with the basic economic and political logistics of urban planning this summer through a research project titled “Selling the City.” The project represents “an analysis of the complex relationship between real estate, consumerism and the middle/working class market” and will be undertaken through means of data collection, interviews and site observation.   More ...

James Robbins '16
James Robbins ’16 Exploring Public Health Challenges Through Levitt Grant

When most of us think about oral health, we might not think far beyond brushing our teeth and our next trip to the dentist’s office. James Robbins ’16, however, knows that there’s much more to it than that. This summer as a Levitt Summer Research Fellow he is researching water fluoridation for improved public health. Working closely with Professor of Biology Herm Lehman, Robbins has been researching the public health debate about water fluoridation.  More ...

Nejla Asimovic '16
Nejla Asimovic ’16 Scrutinizes Sexual Violence as a Weapon of War

Nejla Asimovic ’16 is returning to the country of her birth this summer to study the history and ongoing effects of sexual violence in the context of war.  Asimovic, a native of Sarajevo, the largest city in the Balkan nation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, is undertaking a research project titled Sexual Violence Against Women and Girls: A Weapon of War? under the advisement of assistant professor of government Gbemende Johnson.  Asimovic is one of four Hamilton students this summer whose research is funded through the Kirkland Endowment’s Summer Associates program.  More ...

Jon Shapiro, working on his project  “Investigating New Reactions of Alpha-iminorhodium carbenoids.”
Jon Shapiro ’17 Studies Chemical Reactions With Biological Activity

This summer, Jon Shapiro ’17 is working with Assistant Professor of Chemistry Max Majireck to explore molecules with potential, biological application. Shapiro hopes not only to create such a molecule, but he also hopes to develop an understanding of how best to create it.  More ...

From left, Samantha Mengual, Zoe Tessler and Daniel O'Shea check garlic mustard samples in the lab.
Students Investigate Invasive Exotic Species

In today’s environmentally conscious academic climate, there has been a significant amount of attention paid to the destruction caused by industry to the planet. However, this summer Hamilton students Samantha Mengual ’16, Zoe Tessler ’16 and Daniel O’Shea ’17 are researching a less frequently considered potential cause of decreasing biodiversity: invasive exotic species. Their research is under the advisement of Associate Professor of Biology William Pfitsch, and is focusing on the Alliaria petiolata plant, more commonly known as garlic mustard.  More ...

A lemur climbs a tree in Madagascar.
Katie Guzzetta '18 Gets Up Close and Personal With Lemurs of Madagascar

Katherine (Katie) Guzzetta ’18 is spending her summer in Ranomafana National Park, Madagascar, studying Propithecus edwardsi, a lemur native to the island nation. Madagascar is famous for the endangered creatures, primates that look  like a cross between a cat,  squirrel and dog. Guzzetta, an intended biochemistry major, is undertaking this research under Dr. Patricia Wright, head of Centre ValBio and professor at Stony Brook University.   More ...

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