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Student Research

Undergraduate Research

Through independent projects, the Senior Program, and summer internships with faculty members, Hamilton provides an increasing number of opportunities for students to engage in significant — often publishable — research at the undergraduate level.

2014 Summer Research Participants >>

Recent News

The Doctor Will See You Now

Bellevue Hospital Center, which was founded on March 31, 1736, is the oldest public hospital in the United States, and has always been focused on individualized care for the patient. Charlotte Beers ’16, a neuroscience major, is experiencing this quality care first-hand as a research associate at the Manhattan-based care facility.  More ...

The Death of the Dollar Bill: The Rise of Bitcoin and Other Online Currencies

With the digitization of information, cyberspace is a developing network that’s changing how we live. In 2009, the first digital currency, Bitcoin, was invented.  Bitcoin has been called a “decentralized virtual currency” by some economists, due to the fact that it is transferred from one user to another, called peer-to-peer or P2P, without the use of any central bank.  Sitong Chen ’16, with Professor of Economics Christophre Georges, worked this summer on an Emerson project, “Analysis of the Internet-born Currency: The Birth of Bitcoin.”  More ...

Ming Chun Tang '16
Tang ’16 Studies Media Response to Climate Science

Roughly every five or six years, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) publishes a report that indicates the current impact of climate change and consequent policy recommendations. The most recent report, the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report, contains three separate reports based on the IPCC’s working groups. Ming Chun Tang ’16, under the guidance of Professor of Government Peter Cannavo, is researching online news media’s coverage of the IPCC’s Fifth Assessment Report for his Levitt Fellowship this summer.  More ...

Unearthing the Secret of the Desert Eyes

The untrod sands of the Egyptian Deserts hold a mystery much older than the construction of the pyramids: hundreds of naturally formed “desert eyes” unblinkingly turned toward the sky for tens of millions of years. Yet, despite their age, these structures have almost no topography; in fact, until the advent of Google Earth, these formations, which lie in the desert west of the Nile, were never studied. Josh Wolpert ’16, is working with Professor of Geosciences Barbara Tewksbury on the Desert Eyes Project, funded through the National Science Foundation (NSF).  More ...

Alex Mitko '16, Katie Callahan '15, Hannah Zucker '15 and Christi Westlin '15.
Oh Say, Can You See? An Examination of Visual Attention

Scrutinizing the pages of Where’s Waldo?, searching for that pesky beanie and striped shirt, your brain is working hard to spot the elusive traveler. This summer, four students are examining various components of visual attention with Assistant Professor of Psychology Alexandra List. Katie Callahan ’15, Christi Westlin ’15 and Alex Mitko ’16 are each working on one of the three elements of the study, “Visual Attention: Failures, Dynamics and Interaction with Auditory Attention,” and Hannah Zucker ’15 is doing an interdisciplinary project.  More ...

John Rufo '16
The Echoes of Ezra Pound

The Cantos, by 1905 Hamilton alumnus Ezra Pound, is an 800-page, unfinished epic poem that is divided into 120 sections, or cantos. The work is widely regarded as controversial due to its experimental style, being loosely structured and arcane, and Pound’s publicized fascist sympathies. “A good deal of the political and economic material in the Cantos is [infamously] wrong-headed,” John Rufo ’16 stated, “but the poetic method and forms are not inherently fascist or anything like that.”  More ...

Elizabeth Larson '16 with Dr. Gregory Jay
Elizabeth Larson '16 Studying With Brown University Professor, Physician

Anyone who has torn their ACL or suffers from osteoarthritis knows just how agonizing the joint pain can be. In the Emergency Medicine Laboratory of Rhode Island Hospital, researchers are working to relieve some of that pain, and keep the damage to the impacted joints minimal. Elizabeth Larson ’16 is spending her summer on the Rhode Island Hospital and Brown University campus assisting Dr. Greogry Jay with his work on Lubricin.  More ...

Chemistry Students Present at MERCURY Conference

Patrick Marris ’16, Mia Kang ’17 and Richard Wenner ’17 presented the results of their summer research projects during the 13th annual Molecular Educational Research Consortium in Undergraduate computational chemistRY (MERCURY) conference. The conference was held July 24-26 at Bucknell University.  More ...

Brenda Narvaez ’17
Brenda Narvaez ’17 Studying Day Laborers in Emerson Project

While many people say they “have to” go to work, others are just happy when they have a job to go to. Many take for granted the security offered by  jobs: making at least minimum wage and being protected by workers’ rights.  But day laborers, individuals who are hired on a day-to-day basis with no guarantee of future work, do not enjoy the same stability. Brenda Narvaez ’17,  is spending the summer in Brooklyn, N.Y., examining this phenomenon.  More ...

Leonard Kilekwang, Blaire Frett, Samantha Mengual, Hannah Trautmann, and Nikole Bonacorsi.
A Deadly Bulls-Eye

Although the number of cases of Lyme disease has been decreasing since 2009, according to the CDC, nearly 30,000 Americans fell prey to the tick-born illness in 2012 alone1. This summer, a group of student researchers is assisting Associate Professor of Biology William Pfitsch with an ecological examination of the relationship between honeysuckle and tick populations.   More ...

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