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Student Research

Programs

The Emerson Foundation Grant Program

Created in 1997, the Emerson Foundation Grant program was designed to provide students with significant opportunities to work collaboratively with faculty members, researching an area of interest. The recipients, covering a range of topics, are exploring fieldwork, laboratory and library research, and the development of teaching materials. The students will make public presentations of their research throughout the academic year.


Emerson Research News

Grant Recipients

The Death of the Dollar Bill: The Rise of Bitcoin and Other Online Currencies

With the digitization of information, cyberspace is a developing network that’s changing how we live. In 2009, the first digital currency, Bitcoin, was invented.  Bitcoin has been called a “decentralized virtual currency” by some economists, due to the fact that it is transferred from one user to another, called peer-to-peer or P2P, without the use of any central bank.  Sitong Chen ’16, with Professor of Economics Christophre Georges, worked this summer on an Emerson project, “Analysis of the Internet-born Currency: The Birth of Bitcoin.”  More ...

John Rufo '16
The Echoes of Ezra Pound

The Cantos, by 1905 Hamilton alumnus Ezra Pound, is an 800-page, unfinished epic poem that is divided into 120 sections, or cantos. The work is widely regarded as controversial due to its experimental style, being loosely structured and arcane, and Pound’s publicized fascist sympathies. “A good deal of the political and economic material in the Cantos is [infamously] wrong-headed,” John Rufo ’16 stated, “but the poetic method and forms are not inherently fascist or anything like that.”  More ...

Brenda Narvaez ’17
Brenda Narvaez ’17 Studying Day Laborers in Emerson Project

While many people say they “have to” go to work, others are just happy when they have a job to go to. Many take for granted the security offered by  jobs: making at least minimum wage and being protected by workers’ rights.  But day laborers, individuals who are hired on a day-to-day basis with no guarantee of future work, do not enjoy the same stability. Brenda Narvaez ’17,  is spending the summer in Brooklyn, N.Y., examining this phenomenon.  More ...

Ianno Recco '16, right, with Professor John McEnroe on Crete.
The Living Past: Archaeological Excavations Bring Ancient City to Life

Today, the written word is widespread and highly structured; yet, there was a point when writing was in its infancy. Almost 5,000 years ago Europe and Asia Minor entered what is known as the Bronze Age, which lasted approximately 2,500 years, and was characterized by proto-writing, early literature, and the widespread use and trade of bronze, allowing for inventions such as the chariot and sword. Ianna Recco ’16 is bringing one such society to life through her Emerson project, “Gournia Excavation Project.”  More ...

Matt Currier '16, right, reviews documents with Assistant Professor of History John Eldevik.
A King and His Kingdom

Before England was united under the monarchy, kings had to establish their legitimacy to gain and maintain power. Loyalty to the king, and support of his authority, were not yet attached to the crown, but had to be won. To discover how this was done, Matthew Currier '16 is examining royal diplomas, a type of charter specific to the crown.  More ...

Mercedes Corredor '15, right, with Professor Marianne Janack.
Mercy Corredor ’15 Examining Hegel’s View on Metaphysics

Mercy Corredor ’15, a philosophy major, is working on an Emerson research project, “Absolute Spirit, Logic, and Contemporary Philosophy: Returning to Hegelian Thought” with Professor of Philosophy Marianne Janack. Corredor is reading Phenomenology of Spirit, to examine Hegel’s view on metaphysics, “the study of what and how things exist,” she explained.  More ...

Tori Fukumitsu,  Ichiro Kataoka (a benshi), and Professor Kyoko Omori.
Benshi, Japanese Silent Film Narrators

This summer, Tori Fukumitsu ’15, an English major and Japanese minor, is working on an independent Emerson project,“Performing With the Picture, Moving With the Times: the Role of Benshi in Preserving a Japanese Cultural Practice and Adapting to a Global Audience” with Associate Professor of East Asian Languages and Literatures (Japanese) Kyoko Omori. Fukumitsu is exploring benshi, Japanese silent film narrators, and their performing art of setsumei.  More ...

Carly Poremba '15
Carly Poremba ’15 Digs Into Botanico-Vegetable Medicine

Between the open curriculum, independent studies and interdisciplinary majors, Hamilton’s dedication to intellectual flexibility is evident. Although most students staying on campus are pursuing research in their field of study, Carly Poremba '15 is embracing the breadth of opportunities offered by the College. Poremba is a neuroscience and creative writing double major who is pursuing an Emerson project, “Horticultural and Historical Exploration of Botanico-Vegetable Medicine.”  More ...

Leigh Gialanella '15 at the Oneida Community Mansion House.
Leigh Gialanella ’15 Studies Print Culture of the Oneida Community

Emerson project recipient Leigh Gialanella ’15 is examining the print culture of the 19th century Utopian religious community known as the Oneida Community and founded in 1848 by John Humphrey Noyes.  More ...

Asad Javed ’15
En Rose: How the Depiction of Homosexuality in French Cinema has Evolved

Although France legalized gay marriage last year, LGBT individuals in the country still feel marginalized. One contributing factor to this is the portrayal of homosexuality in the media, the topic Asad Javed '15, film and French double major, is spending the summer studying. He is working on the independent Emerson project, En Rose - The Depiction and Reception of Homosexuality in French Cinema, with Professor of French Martine Guyot-Bender.  More ...

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