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Student Research

Programs

The Emerson Foundation Grant Program

Created in 1997, the Emerson Foundation Grant program was designed to provide students with significant opportunities to work collaboratively with faculty members, researching an area of interest. The recipients, covering a range of topics, are exploring fieldwork, laboratory and library research, and the development of teaching materials. The students will make public presentations of their research throughout the academic year.


Emerson Research News

Grant Recipients

Muhammad Najib ’18
Falling Oil Prices: Great for Consumers, Bad for Russian Economy

While falling prices at the gas pump may be a boon for everyday consumers, fluctuations in the price of gasoline can have very real consequences for nations such as Russia, the second largest exporter of oil in the world. Muhammad Najib ’18, along with Visiting Assistant Professor of Economics Onur Sapci, is this summer attempting to assess the impacts that falling oil prices have had and will continue to have upon the Russia’s economy, politics and macroeconomic policy decisions.  More ...

Lily Johnston '16 studies outside the Kennedy Center for Theatre and the Studio Arts.
Student Delves into Color Theory Through Personal Interactions

Though the human eye processes hundreds of different shades and tones every day, color may not be a subject that is often considered by the average individual. Art major Lily Anne Johnston ’16, however is exploring color theory this summer in order to paint a vivid picture of the Upstate New York area’s regional color history through an Emerson Foundation grant.  More ...

Arthur Williams '16 at the Lend for America Summit in Berkeley, Calif., in Nov. 2014. It's the leading summit for student-led microfinance organizations.
Arthur Williams ’16 Studying Microfinance Impact on Cuban Entrepreneurship

Over the past seven years Cuba has seen many changes. Since Raúl Castro assumed the Cuban presidency in 2008, he has introduced a number of economic reforms that have removed many commercial restrictions and lessened government control. This has resulted in a growing private sector and a rise in Cuban self-employed entrepreneurs.  More ...

Elana Van Arnam '17
Was Spain's Queen Juana I Truly Mad?

Elana Van Arnam ’17 is pursuing research into one of Spain’s most commonly misunderstood monarchs: Juana I of Castile. Popularly known as “Juana la Loca,” or Juana the Mad, the Queen is one of the most iconic figures in early-modern Spanish history.  Van Arnam’s summer research is funded through an Emerson Summer Collaborative Research Award and is being directed by Assistant Professor of Hispanic Studies Xavier Tubau.  More ...

Grace Berg '16 left, with her project adviser Barbara Gold, the Edward North Professor and chair of Classics
Grace Berg ’16 Examines Penelope's Role in Homer’s Odyssey

As more and more contemporary scholars begin to reevaluate the roles of female characters in foundational ancient texts, Grace Berg ’16 is this summer assessing scholarly reactions to reimaginings of Penelope, the wife of Odysseus in Homer’s Odyssey through an Emerson Summer Collaborative Research Award.  Berg’s project is titled Penelope and Her Odyssey: A Reception Study, and her adviser is Barbara Gold, the Edward North Professor and chair of Classics.  More ...

Kelsey Crane '17 in Hamilton's Kennedy Center for Theatre and the Studio Arts.
Kelsey Crane ’17 Explores the Power of the Monologue

When you think of Shakespeare’s play Hamlet, Hamlet’s soliloquy “to be, or not to be” is probably the first thing that comes to mind. This scene is just one well-known example of the power of monologues. Monologues, whether in a 17th-century play or a recent movie, have a special power to delve into the mind of characters and connect with audiences. This summer, Kelsey Crane ’17 is exploring the particular power of monologues, working with Professor of Theatre Craig Latrell under an Emerson Summer Research grant.  More ...

Elizabeth Lvov '17 with Blacka di Danca, a well-known dancer who has performed in music videos and in shows in Times Square on New Years Eve.
Elizabeth Lvov ’17 Explores Female Identity Through Stories and Dance

Elizabeth Lvov ’17 is exploring the crossroads between women’s studies, cultural studies, creative writing and dance this summer through the lens of her comparative literature major in an Emerson Grant project titled “The Embodiment of Music: A Creative Exploration of Female Identity Through Stories and Dance.” Lvov is working with faculty advisor Visiting Assistant Professor of Women’s Studies Joyce Barry.  More ...

John Rufo '16 reads at Bowery Poetry Club.
The Politics of Poetry

John Rufo ’16 is taking poetry beyond the personal and into the political this summer with an Emerson project titled “Hybrid Forms, Hybrid Voices: A Creative Study of Contemporary Political Poetics.”  More ...

Marquis Palmer 18, right, discusses his Emerson project with his advisor Professor Rick Werner.
Marquis Palmer ’18 Examining #BlackLivesMatter Movement

This summer, Marquis Palmer ’18 is exploring conceptual frameworks with the potential to contribute to the recent #BlackLivesMatter movement, focusing primarily on an unexpected and popularly misunderstood school of thought — anarchism. His research is an Emerson project under the direction of John Stewart Kennedy Professor of Philosophy Richard Werner.  More ...

 Rachel Beamish '16 poses in front of Greek temples while studying abroad in Rome.
Ancient Mythology Is New Again in Rachel Beamish ’16 Emerson Project

Classic mythology originated thousands of years ago, yet it still resonates with audiences today. With an Emerson Foundation grant, Rachel Beamish ’16 is examining adaptations of classical and Egyptian mythology within modern young adult novels. She is working with Professor of Africana Studies and Classics Shelley Haley to examine how contemporary novels adapt classical mythology to 21st century American culture.  More ...

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