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Technology in Teaching Showcase

Collaborative Technology-Based Projects at Hamilton College


Social Justice Postcard Project Project Overview


Description and Resources


Social Justice Postcard Project


Course Name:
Introduction to Afro-Latin@ History and Cultures



Course Description:
This course will examine Afro-Latino culture and history, developing a broad historical overview while focusing on the continuing demographic changes of the present generation in and across the Americas. Important historical and cultural links between African Americans and Latinos of African descent will be also be explored. Exposure to a variety of historical, literary, and artistic sources, and the several perspectives of important scholars and theorists will permit students a critical introduction to the works and ideas that have formed the core of the growing field in Afro-Latino/a Studies.



Project Description:
Each student was asked to create a postcard answering the question, “Does race still matter in the U.S.?” The front of the postcard must be illustrated with artwork and contain the term “race.” The back of the postcard contains a message from the student to their audience addressing the project question.



Faculty:
» Professor Angel D. Nieves



Completed Student Projects

Social Justice Postcards - Created Fall, 2008



Goals, Process and Outcomes


Project Goals:
Using both new and old forms of media as tools for communicating ideas.


Learning Objectives:
Demonstration of understanding of visual media as a tool for social justice.



Project Process:
The faculty member, instructional technologist and reference librarian partnered to coordinate a series of skill building workshops that addressed information, visual and technology literacies. Students attended in-class workshops on visual literacy and “reading” an image that included deconstruction of examples and brainstorming of ideas. Students also attended workshops outside of class time to learn the technical skills required to complete the project (PowerPoint, scanning, PhotoShop, etc.) The faculty member, instructional technologist and invited experts held an informal critique with the students to provide feedback before the final products were due.



Learning Outcomes:
Each student created a unique postcard addressing the question, “Does race still matter in the U.S.?” from a personal perspective. As a group the students crafted an exhibition description that accompanied a public exhibit of the postcards in the library. Extra postcard were printed to be shared with various members of the Hamilton Community.



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