DCF94280-E8F7-F166-A62F886D097067AC
F5BA4390-FD5A-25D3-78419AEB9BC17BD0

Computer Science

Research Opportunities

Computer science majors are regularly hired as research assistants during the school year and over the summer. In this role they collaborate with faculty members on a range of projects funded by such sources as the National Science Foundation. Many of these projects lead to publication and presentations at professional conferences. Computer science majors also frequently serve as teaching and laboratory assistants during the school year. Further, the lab-based computer science curriculum at Hamilton makes virtually every course a research experience.

The Taylor Science Center.
10 Female Students Funded for Science Research by Luce Foundation

Ten women participating in summer research in the Hamilton College Chemistry, Computer Science and Physics departments have been recognized as Clare Boothe Luce Undergraduate Research Scholars. Funded through a grant from the Henry Luce Foundation and matching funds from Hamilton College, these awards provide stipends and funding for equipment, supplies, and travel to encourage women to either begin or continue research projects in the three disciplines.  More ...

Eric Collins '17
Collins '17 and Dennis '18 Create New Computer Programming Language

As many who have tried computer coding know, the introductory languages used in the field can often be difficult to approach and unintuitive. It is with this in mind that Eric Collins ’17 and Alex Dennis ’18 with Associate Professor of Computer Science Alistair Campbell, are this summer creating a new programming language called CSPy geared specifically toward beginners.  More ...

Mykhailo Antoniv '17 at Grand Central Tech.
Mykhailo Antoniv ’17 Entrenched in Tech in Dual Internship

Mykhailo Antoniv ’17 is making the most of his computer science major this summer in an internship with Grand Central Tech, a startup accelerator headquartered in New York City. Through his work with GCT, Antoniv is also acting as an intern at Backtrace, an error debugging platform for native applications. His endeavors this summer are supported by the Class of 2006 Fund, managed through Hamilton’s Career and Life Outcomes Center.  More ...

Talia Vaughan '18 plays the AF-MATB game while researchers use cameras to collect data during the workload study.
Fortunato ’17, Sahlberg ’17 Seek to Improve Biometric Technologies

Computer science majors Jason Fortunato ’17 and Linnea Sahlberg ’17 are attempting to improve upon expensive biometric technologies this summer through a research project titled Remote Functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy. Working under Stephen Harper Kirner Chair of Computer Science Stuart Hirshfield, their research is focused on the creation of relatively unintrusive alternatives to Near Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) equipment, utilizing lasers to operate remotely instead of the common skin-contact reliant systems of traditional equipment.  More ...

Spencer Gulbronson '12 (seated), Stu Hirshfield and Leanne Hirshfield '02 measure cognitive and emotional brain responses using non-invasive techniques.
Research on Human-Computer Interaction Published

“Using Noninvasive Brain Measurement to Explore the Psychological Effects of Computer Malfunctions on Users during Human-Computer Interactions,” co-authored by Leanne Hirshfield ’02, Stephen Harper Kirner Professor of Computer Science Stuart Hirshfield, Mathew Farrington ’12, Spencer Gulbronson ’12 and Diane Paverman ’13, was published in Advances in Human-Computer Interaction.  More ...

Nick Brewer '14
Nick Brewer ’14 Researches People's Ability to Detect Lies

Recent studies have found that the average American lies 11 times a week.  It is, of course, possible to tell a lie that goes undetected or, alternatively, to be accused of lying when innocent.  With the help of Stuart Hirshfield, the Stephen Harper Kirner Professor of Computer Sciences, Nick Brewer ’14 is researching how well people detect lies and accept truths.  More ...

Chris Lepre '15 and Rachel Friedman '15
Preventing the Spread of False Information

Information, regardless of its accuracy, spreads rapidly through social media, reaching and influencing millions of readers.  In special instances, stories achieve viral status, where a large number of people receive the material within days, if not hours. Unfortunately, oftentimes information is incorrect, yet people accept it as true.  More ...

Diane Paverman '13 and Eric Murray '13.
Student Researchers “Teach” Computer to Identify Human State of Mind

George Orwell’s iconic dystopian novel 1984 famously featured cameras capable of discerning a person’s state of mind – their contentedness, truthfulness or trustfulness – simply by looking at their face. The year 1984 came and went without such a technology emerging, but as demonstrated by Diane Paverman ’13 and Eric Murray’s ’13 summer research on the functional near-infrared spectrometer (fNIRS), scientists are getting closer to achieving Orwellian-like surveillance capabilities.  More ...

Sarah Hammond '14 and Justin Smith '14
Hammond ’14 and Smith ’14 Create New Text Analysis Software

Imagine being able to select any written document on a computer and automatically know where the writer struggled, which sections the writer breezed through, and if the writer had plagiarized – all without reading a single word of the document itself. The idea seems simple enough to conceive with the use of text extracting programs and subsequent algorithms, but, surprisingly, no software maker has produced such a product.  More ...

Cupola