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 It is never too early to start planning for study abroad! Planning should begin during your first year at Hamilton or at least one year before you plan on studying off campus.

Getting Started

Your passport must be valid for at least 6 months after the end of your anticipated study abroad program. Learn more about how to apply for or renew a U.S. passport.

  • Complete your physical education, QSR, and writing requirements by the start of your study abroad program (Check your status on these requirements by looking at your “Program Evaluation” in WebAdvisor.)
  • Have a minimum 2.7 Study Abroad GPA (not cumulative GPA). The study abroad GPA is the average GPA of the two semesters immediately preceding the last semester at Hamilton before going abroad.
  • No final grades of F in the semester immediately preceding your study abroad program
  • To study abroad in a non-English-speaking country, you must pass a course or otherwise show proficiency in the country's language at:
    • The fourth-semester (140) level for French, German, Russian or Spanish;
    • The second semester (120) level for Chinese and Japanese; 
    • The second-semester (120) level for instructor-based Critical Languages: Arabic, Hebrew or Italian. 
  • Must not be on academic or social probation on the start date of your study abroad program (Students with six points or more are not allowed to study abroad. Refer to the Code of Student Conduct for more information.)
  • Your Hamilton account must be paid in full prior to the start of your study abroad program.

Students have access to a broad range of international and domestic academic programs abroad.

Meet with a Study Abroad Advisor

Navigate to the Global Learning Portal and follow the instructions to login with your Hamilton credentials and complete the Study Abroad Planning Form. At the end of the form you will be prompted to make an appointment with a study abroad advisor.

Planning Checklists

To keep on track, use these checklists to start planning as early as your first year at Hamilton!

  • Tell your advisor that you are interested in off-campus study so they can help you integrate it into your academic plan.
  • Start fulfilling study abroad eligibility requirements: QSR, writing-intensive, and PE requirements.
  • Maintain good academic standing with a GPA of at least 2.7. Many destinations require a higher GPA.
  • To keep your study abroad options open, consider taking a language course to meet the language requirement.
  • Pre-health professions students: Work with the pre-health professions advisor to plot your course plan so there will be space in your schedule for study abroad.
  • Start looking into Hamilton’s programs and Hamilton's pre-approved programs list to familiarize yourself with your options.
  • Inform yourself about any program pre-requisites, some of which are specific.
  • Attend program information sessions on campus and virtually. Many programs will send a representative to campus once a semester to share program information. 
  • Meet with the Student Fellowships Coordinator to get help applying for study abroad scholarships, such as the Gilman Scholarship.
  • Consider applying for the Critical Language Scholarship, a national scholarship competition that pays for summer language immersion study.
  • Talk with students who have studied abroad.
  • Visit the Global Learning website to complete the Study Abroad Planning Form and meet with a study abroad advisor.
  • Stay in touch with the Office of Global Learning! Read your emails and follow us on Instagram @hamiltonabroad

View this checklist as a PDF

 

Study Abroad Planning for Second-Year Students

  • Remind your advisor about your interest in studying off-campus either for the semester or the full year.
  • Check with your advisor about the courses you need to take to stay on target to complete your major and minor requirements.
  • Continue to complete the study abroad eligibility requirements: QSR, writing-intensive, and PE requirements.
  • Maintain good academic standing with a GPA of at least 2.7. Many destinations require a higher GPA.
  • To keep your study abroad options open, consider taking a language course to meet the language requirement.
  • Start looking into Hamilton’s programs and Hamilton's pre-approved programs list to familiarize yourself with your options.
  • Inform yourself of program pre-requisites and application deadlines.
  • Attend program information sessions on campus and virtually. Many programs will send a representative to campus once a semester to share program information. 
  • Meet with the Student Fellowships Coordinator to get help applying for study abroad scholarships, such as the Gilman Scholarship.
  • Consider applying for the Critical Language Scholarship, a national scholarship competition that pays for summer language immersion study.
  • Visit the Global Learning website to complete the Study Abroad Planning Form and meet with a study abroad advisor as early as possible.
  • Talk with students who have studied abroad.
  • Stay in touch with the Office of Global Learning! Read your emails and follow us on Instagram @hamiltonabroad

View this checklist as a PDF

Concentration Requirements and Information

Students from a wide variety of concentrations are able to incorporate at least one semester of off-campus study into their academic programs. All study abroad requires planning, but students in some departments may find that fulfilling their requirements on campus and/or transferring credit from study abroad for their concentration requires particularly early planning. Look at information from departments of interest to you to learn what their concentrators need to know to study abroad.

Please see the Art Concentrator's Guide for more information.

Biology concentrators can receive up to two credits toward the concentration from study abroad. Programs in which full enrollment is five or more courses will return four Hamilton units if students are fully enrolled, but each course receives only partial credit. In these cases students will need to take two biology courses to count one full credit toward the concentration, or three biology courses to count two full credits toward the concentration.

Students who conduct an approved biology-focus independent study may be able to transfer that credit toward the concentration. They should discuss plans for their project with biology faculty prior to departing for study abroad. Since all projects must be approved by the department chair upon return, students should be careful to bring back documentation — a detailed field notebook, data set, etc. — as well as the final paper for the project.

The Classics Department encourages students to study in approved programs abroad, especially in Greece and Rome. This is best done in the junior year, either fall or spring but spring is preferred. Concentrators should note that most programs in Greece and Rome do not teach beginning Latin or Greek, so those courses should be completed before the student goes abroad if the concentrator needs them to complete the concentration. Because classics students know Latin or Greek, they are not also required to take courses in the language of the country they are visiting before they go abroad. The department will accept most courses in related fields taken in approved programs abroad, but those courses must be approved by the department chair before the student's semester abroad.

Concentrators should consult with their advisor about specific course requirements. Students who have taken computer science courses beginning in their first year and who progress in the concentration sophomore year should be in a good position to take part in any study-abroad program supported by the College. Students who started the concentration after their first year will likely need to double up to be prepared for CPSCI 410, the Senior Seminar, which must be taken fall semester of senior year. Courses from study abroad programs will not fulfill major requirements.

Chinese/Mandarin Language and Literature

Program Location and Theme Program Notes
China - CET Beijing  
China - Middlebury in Beijing  
China - CET Shanghai  
China - CIEE Shanghai  
Taiwan - Middlebury in Taiwan   
Taiwan - CET Taiwan  

Japanese Language and Literature

Location and Program  Program Notes
Japan - Kyoto Center for Japanese Studies (Columbia Univ.)  
Japan - Temple Japan (Temple Univ.)  
Japan - International Christian University (Middlebury College)  
Japan - Associated Kyoto Program  
Japan - Nanzan University (IES)  
Japan - CET Japan  
Japan - Study Center at Sophia University (CIEE)  

 

Economics majors should be aware that they must take the required courses Economics 265, 275 and 285 at Hamilton College. They may not transfer credit for these courses. They should plan to complete all three courses PRIOR to their study abroad because they may not be able to do so senior year. Also, students may not count any transferred courses for 400-level credit, even for the required two electives. They may, however, transfer credits for electives at the 200 or 300-level. They should not take and transfer credit at the 300-level for any course that substantially overlaps a 400-level course they intend to take at Hamilton.

The department does not approve transfer credit courses that are not fundamentally economics courses. Students also will not receive transfer credit for courses that lack sufficient prerequisites, for instance at least one introductory level course in economics for courses taught at the 200- or 300-level. And they will not receive transfer credit for courses that are not sufficiently rigorous or are not appropriate to the liberal arts mission of the College. Courses in business, accounting, management and marketing typically will not be approved for transfer credit.

English concentrators may receive transfer credit from study abroad for courses in literature written in English. One course on a foreign literature taught in the original language, or a course in comparative literature, can be counted toward the concentration – but not as an advanced course and only if  the student has not previously counted such a course taken at Hamilton.

Concentrators studying abroad may also use the opportunity to complete the foreign language requirement. Students who hope to start the language requirement abroad and complete it at Hamilton should make sure that the language they will study is regularly offered through Critical Languages. It is not possible for students to complete the second semester of the language requirement at Hamilton for rarely-taught languages such as Czech, Danish, Swedish and many African and Asian languages.

Students with a concentration or minor in Environmental Studies who plan on pursuing a study abroad program focused on environmental studies and have not completed the Hamilton College language requirement pertaining to the country do not need to petition if the program is on the pre-approved ES study abroad program list. (Additional domestic programs may be available through Experiential Learning.)

Theme-based Programs

School for Field Studies (SFS)
SFS creates transformative study abroad experiences through field-based learning and research. SFS operates permanent field stations, located in areas especially suited for academic study and community engagement, to provide a context for students seeking to understand complex environmental issues on a global scale. In addition to regular coursework, students participate in outreach activities such as tree plantings, stream clean ups, and youth swim classes, and present research findings to interested stakeholders and members of the community at the end of the term.

Location and Program Theme Program Notes
Australia - Rainforest to Reef  
Bhutan - Himalayan Environment and Society in Transition  
Cambodia - Environmental Justice and Mekong Ecologies  
Chile - Wild Patagonia: Fire and Ice Not approved for HSPST credit
Costa Rica - Ecological Resilience Studies Not approved for HSPST credit
Kenya - Endangered Species  
Panama - Tropical Island Biodiversity Studies Not approved for HSPST credit
Peru - The Living Amazon Not approved for HSPST credit
Tanzania - Wildlife Management Studies  
Turks and Caicos Islands - Marine Resource Studies  

 

School for International Training (SIT) 
SIT offers natural science-based programs exploring global hotspots, with a focus on ecology, biodiversity, and conservation, as well as social science-based programs that emphasize environmental justice. Students in all programs develop the knowledge and skills to become leaders in shaping environmental policies and balancing ecological outcomes for an uncertain future.

Location and Program Theme Program Notes

Argentina - People, Environment & Climate Change in Patagonia and Antarctica

Not approved for HSPST credit
Australia - Sustainability and Environmental Action  
Australia - Rainforest, Reef and Cultural Ecology  
Ecuador - Comparative Ecology and Conservation Not approved for HSPST credit
Iceland - Climate Change and the Arctic  
IHP Climate Change - The Politics of Land, Water, and Energy Justice Multiple countries; ES concentrators only
Madagascar - Biodiversity and Natural Resource Management  
Panama - Tropical Ecology, Marine Ecosystems, and Biodiversity Conservation Not approved for HSPST credit
Tanzania - Wildlife Conservation and Political Ecology  
Tanzania - Zanzibar Coastal Ecology and Natural Resource Management


Sea Education Association (SEA)
SEA offers a variety of programs with focuses on science, environmental issues, culture and history. SEA programs begin on campus in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, then include either a remote shore component or a sailing component on a tall ship. Each vessel carries a captain, three mates, a chief scientist, three assistant scientists, an engineer, and a steward. The mates and assistant scientists pair up together to lead a watch of about eight students. The mate runs the deck, teaches navigation and sail handling, and ensures the safety of all on deck. Prior sailing experience is not required and training will be provided while in Woods Hole. 

Program Theme Program Notes
Climate Change and Coastal Resilience Sailing in New Zealand
Climate Change: The Gulf of Maine Remote shore component in Maine
Climate & Society Sailing in New Zealand
Coral Reef Conservation Remote shore component across the Caribbean
Marine Biodiversity & Conservation Sailing from New Zealand to Tahiti 
Oceans & Climate Sailing from Fiji to New Zealand 


Marine Biological Laboratories (MBL)
MBL is dedicated to scientific discovery – exploring fundamental biology, understanding biodiversity and the environment, and informing the human condition through research and education. Based in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, the MBL is a private, nonprofit institution and an affiliate of the University of Chicago.

Location and Program Theme Program Notes

Semester in Environmental Science (SES)

Intensive field and laboratory-based learning opportunities to better understand ecosystem science and the biogeochemistry of coastal forests, freshwater ponds, and estuaries.

Semester in Biological Discovery (SBD)

Series of four 3-week modules, each a deep dive into a subject taught by an MBL scientist who is actively engaged in research on the topic they’re teaching. Students will be conducting open-ended experiments and independent research projects, not following a lab manual with cookbook expectations.  A fifth course runs across several modules and explores topics such as visual arts or the history and philosophy of science.


University-Based Programs

Location and University Program Notes
Australia - James Cook University Arcadia or IFSA
United Kingdom (Ireland) - University College Dublin (with optional STEM Research) Arcadia or IFSA
United Kingdom (Scotland) - University of Aberdeen Arcadia

 

Students applying to the Hamilton in France Program must have at least French 200, although excellent students who have studied through French 140 may apply. It is important that students have at least some experience writing in French prior to taking university courses in France. The department will award credit toward the major for most courses taken in France, provided they are taught in French and pertain in some way to France. Consult the College Catalogue or the French Department website for more information.

Geoscience concentrators will find a variety of programs abroad which provide unique opportunities to explore various themes in the discipline. (Additional domestic programs may be available through Experiential Learning.)

Location and Program Program Notes
New Zealand - University of Otago  Geoscience students regularly attend this program.
United Kingdom (Scotland) - University of St. Andrews Students who are interested in a program in a much smaller town also regularly attend this program.
New Zealand - Earth Systems Semester with Field Camp in Auckland (Skidmore College) Academic semester at a NZ university with an opportunity for a field camp in the summer.
New Zealand - Earth Systems Semester with Field Camp in Christchurch (Skidmore College) Academic semester at a NZ university with an opportunity for a field camp in the summer.
New Zealand - Geology of New Zealand Semester with Field Camp in Christchurch (Skidmore College) Academic semester at a NZ university with an opportunity for a field camp in the summer.
Kenya - Turkana Basin Institute, Origins Field School  

 

Completion of German 140 or equivalent proficiency is required by Hamilton College. 

 

Location and Program Program Notes
Austria - Trinity in Vienna (Trinity College)

Spring

Germany - Berlin Consortium for German Studies (Columbia Univ.)

Fall, Spring, Year

Germany - University of Dortmund

Spring, Year

Germany (Freiburg) - Albert-Ludwigs Univ. (Colgate Univ.)

Spring

Germany (Munich) - Ludwig-Maximilians Univ. (Wayne State)

Year

Germany (Tubingen) - Eberhard-Karls-Univ. (Tufts University)

Spring, Year

 

The department normally awards transfer credit for government at the 200-level.  Credit may be granted at the 300-level if a course includes a major research paper and if the paper is submitted to the department chair for final approval upon return to Hamilton.

The department normally awards transfer credit for history at the 200-level. Credit may be granted at the 300-level in rare circumstances, provided that the department chair reviews and approves the relevant course syllabi. The department advises concentrators to take at least one 300-level seminar before studying abroad, as this will relieve the pressure of upper-division coursework in the senior year

The Mathematics Department requires that one of its two required courses, Modern Algebra (Math 325) and Real Analysis (Math 314), be taken before the fall of senior year. Students planning to go abroad in spring of the junior year should, therefore, take one of these courses before leaving. No course at the precalculus level may be transferred for College credit of any kind. Students planning to spend a full year studying in a non-native language will need to plan carefully to be able to meet all the concentration requirements because the department advises that you not take math courses in a non-native language. Students going for only one term or who will be studying in their native languages do not usually have problems meeting the requirements.

Some suggested programs for math concentrators include:

Location and Program Program Notes
Hungary - Budapest Semesters in Mathematics Education
  • Small classes, taught in English
  • Community of mathematically motivated students
  • Modest living costs
Mexico - Mathematical Sciences Semesters in Guanajuato (MSSG)
  • Interdisciplinary work involving Mathematics, Statistics, and Computer Science for research pursuits, teaching, and collaboration with government and industry
  • Small groups, taught in English

University-based Programs (with Arcadia or IFSA

While these university programs are highlighted for their math offerings, this list is not exhaustive. Many other pre-approved university-based programs may also work well for math coursework. 

Location and University Program Notes
Australia - University of Melbourne Research in Algebra, Geometry and Topology, Discrete Mathematics, Mathematical Biology
Australia - University of New South Wales Focus on Applied Mathematics and Statistics 
Australia - University of Sydney   
New Zealand - University of Auckland Expert staff who are globally recognized in theoretical and applied mathematics, with research interests in Analysis and Geometry, Applied Mathematics and Mathematics Education. 
United Kingdom (England) - University College London

Research interests in Inverse Problems, Number Theory, Fluid Dynamics, Mathematical Modeling and more. 

United Kingdom (Ireland) - Trinity College Dublin  
United Kingdom (Scotland) - University of Edinburgh

Teaching and research focuses in Analysis and Probability, Data and Decisions, Structure and Symmetry

United Kingdom (Scotland) - University of Glasgow

Research interests, including Continuum Mechanics, Integrable Systems and Mathematical Physics, Mathematical Biology

The Philosophy Department encourages concentrators to finish Philosophy 201, 203, and the logic requirement, by the end of the sophomore year, though this is not required.  Philosophy concentrators often complete their concentration requirements while studying away from campus for a semester or even a year without transferring any concentration credit.  Students may transfer a maximum of one 400-level credit toward their philosophy concentration from off-campus study.

Students are encouraged to begin planning with the Health Professions Advisor and the Global Learning office within their first year at Hamilton, if possible. Some important points to consider include: 

  • It is highly recommended that students take Chem 120 in their first year. (Without this, it may not be possible to fit in study abroad, pre-reqs for their desired health profession, and requirements for their major. Mapping out a tentative four-year plan enables students to see what’s possible.)
  • A template for this can be found on the Health Professions website under their chosen field and then “academic planning.”
  • It is not advisable to take prerequisite courses abroad as many schools will not accept them from an international institution.
  • Programs with a foreign language requirement mean fitting in additional (language) courses.

Theme-based Programs

Program Provider Location and Program Theme Program Notes
School for International Training Programs (SIT)
Global Health and Well-Being
Argentina - Public Health in Urban Environments

Taught in Spanish 
Hamilton Prereq: Spanish 140

Chile - Public Health, Traditional Medicine & Community Empowerment

Taught in Spanish
Hamilton Prereq: Spanish 140

India - Public Health, Gender & Sexuality  
Jordan - Refugees, Health & Humanitarian Action Hamilton Prereq: Arabic 120 
Kenya - Global Health & Human Rights  
Switzerland - Global Health & Development Policy Hamilton Prereq: French 140

 

Direct-Enroll University Programs with Third-Party Partner Providers: Arcadia University and IFSA

Location and University Program or Track
Australia - University of Sydney Health Sciences modules/units of study
New Zealand - University of Otago Health Sciences: Community Health, Pacific and Global Health, Public Health, Maori Health
United Kingdom (England) - King's College Health and Society Track
United Kingdom (England) - University of Manchester Public Health, Biomedical Sciences, Medical Physiology & other STEM options
United Kingdom (Ireland) - University College Dublin Pre-Vet Program
United Kingdom (Ireland) - University College Dublin Undergraduate Science Research
United Kingdom (Scotland) - University of Glasgow Pre-Med courses in Functional Anatomy, Immunology, Physiology, Neuroscience

 

DIS Study Abroad Pre-Health and Pre-Medicine Programs

In addition to the Core Courses listed below, there are numerous related electives available in both Copenhagen and Stockholm.

Core Courses in Copenhagen  Cognitive Neuroscience of Consciousness
European Clinical Psychology
Healthcare Systems: A Comparative Approach
Human Health and Disease: A Clinical Approach
Medical Biotechnology and Drug Development
Psychopharmacology: Substances and the Brain
Core Courses in Stockholm Cognitive Neuroscience of Addiction
Neuroscience of Emotion
Precision Medicine: Tailored Treatment in Clinical Practice

 

Please see the Psychology Concentrator's Guide for more information.

The department strongly encourages study abroad. Students should take Sociology 301, 302 or both, if possible, prior to studying abroad in their junior year. Both courses must be taken at Hamilton. Courses in related disciplines, such as anthropology, social work or urban studies may be transferred for credit as sociology electives with departmental approval. Because Sociology 549 and 550 (senior thesis courses) are required and taken in the senior year, sociology majors should not be off campus during their senior year.

Theatre students contemplating study abroad should be aware that certain courses required for the concentration are taught only in alternating years, and are not available as independent coverage: Theatre History (307) and Advanced Acting (301) are currently among those courses. Theatre History is generally taught during the fall semester, while Advanced Acting is generally taught during the spring semester. Thus, students wishing to study abroad should either fulfill these requirements prior to leaving campus or should make sure that they will be taught during a semester following their return.

Credit towards the concentration is usually granted only when a course is similar to a required Hamilton theatre course, in its catalog description and syllabus. Credit is usually not granted for technical courses, either in acting or design, or for courses consisting largely of attendance at productions.

Location and Program Program Notes
Italy - Physical Theater Program (Accademia Dell'Arte)
  • With written approval from Theatre Department
  • Hamilton Language Requirement: ITA 120
United Kingdom (England) - RADA Shakespeare in Performance (NYU Tisch)  
United Kingdom (England) - British American Drama Academy (BADA) (Sarah Lawrence College)  
United States (Chicago) - Second City Comedy Studies (Columbia College Chicago)  

 

Completion of Russian 120 or equivalent proficiency is required by Hamilton College.

Location and Program Program Notes
Armenia - Advanced Russian Language and Area Studies Program (American Councils)  
Georgia - Identity and Conflict in the Post-Soviet Space (SRAS)  
Kazakhstan - Advanced Russian Language and Area Studies Program (American Councils)  

 

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