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Celeste Day Moore


Celeste Day Moore
Celeste Day Moore

Assistant Professor of History

Kirner-Johnson 135
315-859-4731

Celeste Day Moore is a historian of African-American culture, media, and Black internationalism in the twentieth century. Her first book, Soundscapes of Liberation: African American Music in Postwar France (Duke University Press, forthcoming, Fall 2021), traces the history of African-American music across the Francophone world, where it took on new meaning, value, and political power alongside the decolonization of the French empire. Most recently, her work has appeared in American Quarterly and the first edited volume of the African American Intellectual History Society (AAIHS). She received her doctorate from the University of Chicago and has been a fellow at the Institut d’Études Politiques in Paris and the Carter G. Woodson Institute for African-American and African Studies at the University of Virginia. At Hamilton, she teaches courses on African-American history as well as histories of empire, race, Black internationalism, and U.S. international relations.

Recent Courses Taught

African-American History
Black Metropolis
Paris Noir: Twentieth-Century Black Internationalism
US International Relations
Race and Capitalism
Great Migrations

Distinctions

  • Summer Stipend Award, National Endowment for the Humanities, 2019.
  • Interdisciplinary Humanities Collaborations Award (with Pavitra Sundar), Humanities Center, Hamilton College, 2017.
  • Class of 1966 Career Development Award, Dean of Faculty, Hamilton College, 2016.
  • Predoctoral Residential Research Fellowship, Carter G. Woodson Institute for African-American and African Studies, University of Virginia, 2012-14.
  • Sciences Po Exchange Fellowship, Institut d’Études Politiques, Paris, France, 2011-12.

Select Publications

  • Soundscapes of Liberation: African American Music in Postwar France (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2021).
  • “Ray Charles in Paris: Race, Protest, and the Soundscape of the Algerian War,” American Quarterly 71, no. 2 (June 2019): 449-72.
  • “Every Wide-awake Negro Teacher of French Should Know”: The Pedagogies of Black Internationalism in the Early Twentieth Century,” New Perspectives on the Black Intellectual Tradition (Evanston: Northwestern University Press, 2018), 25-40. 
Public Scholarship

Professional Affiliations

African American Intellectual History Society
Organization of American Historians
American Studies Association
Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations
International Association for the Study of Popular Music

Appointed to the Faculty: 2014

Educational Background

Ph.D., University of Chicago
A.M., University of Chicago
B.A., Haverford College

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