Italian

Note: This is a collection of courses, not a major or a minor.

Students at Hamilton are currently able to take up to 5 semesters of Italian and they are encouraged to experience ‘full immersion’ in the language and culture by studying abroad in Italy through one of the college’s approved study programs during their junior year. Study abroad in Italy requires one year of study of the language. While there is currently no concentration or minor in Italian, students in several concentrations, especially Art History and Medieval and Renaissance Studies, frequently study the language. Italian classes at Hamilton College are highly interactive and they focus on obtaining both communicative and cultural competency in Italian. As part of the overall experience of becoming linguistically proficient in the language, students also develop cross-cultural skills through exposure to Italian music, films, literature, art and current events.

110F First Term Italian.
Introduction in speaking, writing, reading and listening comprehension. Highly interactive with a strong emphasis on obtaining both communicative and cultural competency in Italian. Classes supplemented by online vocabulary-building and grammar practice sessions and Language Center projects and activities. For students with no prior experience in Italian. Those with previous experience with the language will take a placement test in order to be placed at the appropriate level of Italian. This course is only offered in the Fall. Not open to seniors. Maximum enrollment, 18. Demos and Sisler.

120S Second Term Italian.
Continued study of speaking, writing, reading and listening comprehension. Highly interactive with a strong emphasis on obtaining both communicative and cultural competency in Italian. Classes supplemented by online vocabulary-building and grammar practice sessions and Language Center projects and activities. This course is only offered in the Spring. Prerequisite, Italian 110 or placement. Maximum enrollment, 18. Demos and Sisler.

130F Third Term Italian.
Strengthening of grammar, syntax and conversation skills through interactive communicative activities. Incorporates films, readings and current events to reinforce cultural competency as well as conversation skills. This course is only offered in the Fall. Prerequisite, Italian 110 and 120 or placement. Maximum enrollment, 20. The Program.

140S Fourth Term Italian.
Focus is on expanding vocabulary and strengthening verbal proficiency and writing skills through increased exposure to literary and cultural readings. This course is only offered in the Spring. Prerequisite, Italian 110, 120 and 130 or placement. Maximum enrollment, 20. Sisler.

150F La dolce vita? - Contemporary Italian Culture through Film.
This introductory course explores Italian socio-political issues in films by directors such as Garrone, Giordana, Ozpetek, Virzì, and Sorrentino. It focuses on: gender roles and stereotypes; ethnicity, immigration and diversity; media, politics and organized crime; and the on-going economic crisis and its particular effect on Italian youth. The objective of this course is to encourage students to think critically as they view films which will broaden their perspective on Italian culture and society and the challenges posed by the 21st century. This course is open to all and is taught in English. No knowledge of Italian required. Demos.

155S Cosa nostra—Mafia myths and realities.
Examination of the evolution of the mafia from the brigand ‘gangs’ of the Unification period in Italy to the ‘Black Hand’ of the early 20th century in the United States, to the modern-day mobsters who have turned to human trafficking in migrant refugees. Exploration of the myths and stereotypes surrounding the portrayal of the mob by Hollywood vs. the reality of how the mafia actually operates at the highest levels of government. Particular attention will be paid to the Sicilian Mafia as well as the Calabrian ‘Ndrangheta and the Neapolitan Camorra. No knowledge of Italian required. Sisler.

160F Italian Renaissance Civilization and Culture: From imitation to innovation.
Was it perhaps something in the water? How did Italy produce so much genius between 1300-1600? Economic stability, enlightened rulers, a burgeoning merchant class, and an insatiable thirst for knowledge spawned one of the most prolific periods of artistic, literary, and scientific progress known to history. From Dante to Da Vinci, Giotto to Galileo, Machiavelli to Michelangelo, and Savonarola to sprezzatura, we will study the men, the women, and the ideas that shaped Western civilization. No knowledge of Italian required. Demos.

200F Introduction to Italian Literature and Culture.
An introductory survey course that offers students continued development of Italian grammar and conversation through literature, film and other cultural products such as music, visual arts and print media. Emphasis on oral and written work. Taught in Italian. Prerequisite, Italian 140 or consent of instructor. Taught in Italian. Maximum enrollment, 20. Sisler.

220S Introduction to Italian Literature and Culture II.
Continuation of Italian 200. Further development of Italian grammar and conversation through literature, film, and other cultural products such as music, visual arts, and print media. Emphasis on oral and written work. Taught in Italian. Prerequisite, Italian 200 or consent of instructor. Maximum enrollment, 20. Demos.

233S Sins and Sinners in Dante’s Inferno.
Why is it that Dante considers fraud to be the most serious type of sin, placing it in the lowest circles of the Inferno? Why are the sins of usury, sodomy and blasphemy linked in Dante’s hierarchy of Hell? This course will provide answers to these questions and an understanding of Dante’s world through a critical reading of the Inferno. (Writing-intensive.) No knowledge of Italian required. (Same as Literature and Creative Writing 233.) Maximum enrollment, 20. Sisler.