A15FFE7C-B62E-6D2F-00AE8505F7D0A0AE
51A36809-572F-4FC6-AA098F3B362F8069

Courses


Transitioning to College Level Work: Consider Taking a Course Designed With First-Year College Students in Mind

Because one size does not fit all with respect to education, Hamilton offers a range of courses dedicated to first-year students to help them transition to college-level work. While all these courses devote attention to the academic acculturation of new college students, they vary in approach and type of engagement. Hamilton offers four types of courses exclusively for first-year students.


Introductory Courses exclusive to first-year students

Introductory courses to a discipline are often restricted to first-year students. These classes vary in size, and the curriculum is specifically targeted to beginning college students.


First-Year Course (FYC) Program

For students who are interested in a course with a more intentional approach to college transition, Hamilton offers a First-Year Course Program. FYCs are a set of courses that provide an opportunity for close interaction around a disciplinary topic or question and support students’ transitions to and immersion in college academic life.  Low enrollments (a maximum of 16-20 students) support the development of strong relationships among students and instructors. Courses with the FYC designation focus on one of the College's basic competencies: writing, quantitative and symbolic reasoning (QSR) and oral presentation.


FYCs with experiential learning

The Leadership Experience and Preparation (LEAP) First-Year Course incorporates a weekly out-of-class experiential learning component of approximately 2-3 hours for the students in addition to class meeting times. The experiential component will focus on developing leadership skills with Levitt Center student mentors.

First-Year Course Descriptions

The following courses are open to first-year students. Click on the title of course to view the course description.

Biology 145 - Biology of Aging

An examination of aging from molecules to cells to systems. The course will examine the contributions of both genetics and environment to the process of aging, explore how we measure aging, and examine the proposed theories of the aging process. An overview of aging in the major organ systems as brought about by change at the molecular and cellular level and examination of the relationship between aging and disease. Three hours of class.

French 160 - History of French Cinema (in English): Labor on Film

This First-Year course offers an overview of major movements of French cinema''s long and significant history. This year''s topic is the representation of labor including films from the Lumière brothers era, post WWI poetic realism, the 1960s'' New Wave and militant cinema to today''s new realism and parody. The theme of work will familiarize students with French social and political history. Taught in English (films in French with English subtitles). Reading on the theory of film and French cultural history will supplement screenings. The class may include field trips.

History 159W - America in the Two World Wars

This course examines the involvement of the United States in the two world wars of the twentieth century, 1917-1918, and 1941-1945. It combines military history with an in-depth consideration of the impact of the wars on U.S. politics, society, economics, and international relations.

Japanese 160W - Modern China Through Film

Examines how films produced in diverse socio-economic contexts generate conflicting modern representations of China, ranging from a legendary land, a rapidly changing society, to an everlasting patriarchy, and how these representations produce hegemonic and subversive cultural knowledge. Students will gain broad understanding of Chinese cinema and history, theory of film and cultural studies, and pertinent Hollywood films. All films have English subtitles. Requirements include film viewings, presentations, quizzes, class discussions and a final paper. All lectures and discussions in English.

Japanese 160W - Modern Selves and Ways of Seeing: Japanese Film, Animation, and Literature

Modern technology has changed the ways in which we see and understand the world around us, as well as ourselves. Up to today, technological advancements have continued to inspire artists to create works that depict such sensorial changes in human experience. This course will examine Japanese animation, films, and literary works that draw our attention to new modes of perception and ways of engaging with the world in the modern age. Open to First-years only.

Literature and Creative Writing 131W - The Experience of Reading: Books as Stories, Books as Objects

Consideration not only of stories in books but also the representations of readers and reading within them and about the cultural and physical experience of reading. How have attitudes toward reading changed over time? Works by Bunyan, Franklin, Blake, Austen, Alcott, Stevenson, Haddon, Creech. Workshops using Hamilton's Rare Book and Book Arts collections and manual printing press.

Literature 131W - The Experience of Reading: Books as Stories, Books as Objects

Consideration not only of stories in books but also the representations of readers and reading within them and about the cultural and physical experience of reading. How have attitudes toward reading changed over time? Works by Bunyan, Franklin, Blake, Austen, Alcott, Stevenson, Haddon, Creech. Workshops using Hamilton's Rare Book and Book Arts collections and manual printing press.

Literature and Creative Writing 145W - Literature and/of Empowerment

Literature has always played important roles in the cultivation of personal, social, and political empowerment. This course explores a range of debates surrounding literature as a means of individual and group empowerment, issues including the cultural politics of representation; the dynamics of different forms of literary address such as testimony, protest, narrative, and abstraction; the construction of personal and group identity and difference; and writing as a tool for self empowerment.

Literature 145W - Literature and/of Empowerment

Literature has always played important roles in the cultivation of personal, social, and political empowerment. This course explores a range of debates surrounding literature as a means of individual and group empowerment, issues including the cultural politics of representation; the dynamics of different forms of literary address such as testimony, protest, narrative, and abstraction; the construction of personal and group identity and difference; and writing as a tool for self empowerment.

Literature and Creative Writing 146W - (Re)Discovering Latin American in Literature

In 1492 Columbus sailed the ocean blue… to unfamiliar lands that were shocking, provocative and elusive. This course examines the ‘discovery’ of America, transcultural encounters, and the myths of/from America (paradise, utopia & lost cities of gold) in literature. Readings span from Mesoamerican stories (Aztec, Maya, Inca), New World voices (Inca Garcilaso, Guamán Poma) to modern Latin American writers & artists (Borges, Saer, Carpentier, Cortázar, Lam, Kahlo, Varos & others).

Literature 146W - (Re)Discovering Latin American in Literature

In 1492 Columbus sailed the ocean blue… to unfamiliar lands that were shocking, provocative and elusive. This course examines the ‘discovery’ of America, transcultural encounters, and the myths of/from America (paradise, utopia & lost cities of gold) in literature. Readings span from Mesoamerican stories (Aztec, Maya, Inca), New World voices (Inca Garcilaso, Guamán Poma) to modern Latin American writers & artists (Borges, Saer, Carpentier, Cortázar, Lam, Kahlo, Varos & others).

Literature and Creative Writing 149W - Finding Identity

“Know thyself." Young people struggled with this injunction long before Hamilton adopted the motto. This course explores how young people in literature—from medieval tales of adventure through 21st c. graphic novels—attempt to define their own identity in relation to their families and societies. We’ll explore how intersections of gender, sexuality, race, and culture come together in the construction of identity. Texts may include anonymous medieval works, as well as novels by Jane Austen, Alison Bechdel, Charles Dickens, Maxine Hong Kingston, and Art Spiegelman. (FYC Spring 2018)

Literature 149W - Finding Identity

“Know thyself." Young people struggled with this injunction long before Hamilton adopted the motto. This course explores how young people in literature—from medieval tales of adventure through 21st c. graphic novels—attempt to define their own identity in relation to their families and societies. We’ll explore how intersections of gender, sexuality, race, and culture come together in the construction of identity. Texts may include anonymous medieval works, as well as novels by Jane Austen, Alison Bechdel, Charles Dickens, Maxine Hong Kingston, and Art Spiegelman. (FYC Spring 2018)

Religious Studies 120W - Religious Diversity in the USA

Religious diversity has been noted in big cities like New York and Los Angeles. But smaller cities like Utica have also diversified, seeing unprecedented population shifts in recent years. This course will take advantage of our proximity to Utica, and explore the mosques, temples, synagogues, and churches that exist there today, as well as explore the rich religious history of Central New York, including the Great Awakenings, Utopian communities, and recent immigration patterns.

Contact Information


Tessa Chefalo

Director of Orientation and First-Year Programs
315-859-4846 tchefalo@hamilton.edu
Back to Top