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Emerson Gallery

History of Exhibitions

2000-01

April 21 - May 20, 2001
  • Senior Art Projects 2001
    An exhibition of works by Hamilton College seniors graduating with a concentration in Fine Arts.

January 1 - March 30, 2001
  • Power of the Word
    Power of the Word presents a variety of works - paintings, drawings, video, photography, graffiti, prints, and a computer installation - by eight contemporary Chinese artists who both celebrate and critique the conventions associated with the written word. The selection of artists reflects the breadth of the curator's experience, covering a wide range of media and artistic backgrounds, from politician to academy-trained artist, from computer programmer to self-trained "outsider". Breaking with the 2,000-yar-old traditions of Chinese calligraphic art, these artists reassess the aesthetic and cultural assumptions of China's word-based society. Their contemporary permutations of calligraphy reflect a fresh understanding of the relationship between language and art, often stimulated by interaction with Western culture. Curator Chang Tson-zung is an art critic and scholar living in Hong Kong.


October 28 - December 15, 2000
  • Personal Dimensions: Five Donors who helped shape the Hamilton College Collection
    This exhibition consists of major gifts to the collection by both alumni and friends of the college: James Taylor Dunn '36, William G. Roehrick '34, Omar S. Pound '51, Easton Pribble, and Philip W. Abell '57.


August 25 - October 15, 2000
  • Romare Bearden in Black-and-White: Photomontage Projections, 1964
    The art of Romare Bearden came of age in the turbulent sixties when the Civil Rights Movement, antiwar rallies, and political assassinations combined to spark a cultural upheaval. The "Photomontage Projections" are monumental compilations of images photo mechanically enlarged from some of the first collages Bearden produced and mark the artist's turn in 1963 and 1964 from the pure abstraction he pursued in the fifties to the collage mode he developed to articulate his social and political concerns.