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Nathaniel Livingston Photograph

Journals

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Living in the CoOp next year!

April 30, 2012   

The housing lottery is over. The hopes and dreams of living in your dream room lay in tatters on the floor. I heard people were crying, having not secured the living situation that they wanted. But with all the pain comes a settling hope that it’s really not so bad. Wherever you live on campus, you will be happy – and if you aren’t, then you can move! That’s what I did. I started out the year in Bundy, and moved up the hill to Babbitt after a month. There was nothing that bad about Bundy, but I wanted to be closer to the KJ building (the huge glass building on the darkside).

I really didn’t participate in much of a housing lottery. I went into the CoOp lottery, so it was about 40-something kids for one house. Because there is a gender ratio that they try to keep at the CoOp, I got in pretty easily. I am rooming with my freshman-year roommate Robert Fagan. I cannot wait. The CoOp is a really chill place. If you live in the CoOp, you are on the seven-meal plan because every night three CoOper’s make dinner. Every week you go shopping and buy sustainable foods and make dinners that have minimal impact on the environment. But that’s just half the charm. The people there always become very close. There is a nice porch on which to relax, and you can see the few tall buildings of Utica. You can also hang out on the roof.

Anyways, it may be colloquially known as “the eating place,” but it could just as easily be called one big family of kids who like to cook and have a good time. It is in the old TDX house, now called the Alexander Woollcott House, a famed alumnus of Hamilton.

This is crunch time for a lot of people, and I know that some are getting stressed, but there is a general air about the college that is pulling people together. Everyone is encouraging each other to work hard, and really it is quite inspiring. I’m glad to go here, and the end of the year is always a poignant time.