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DHi Speaker Series 2017

DHi Speaker Series 2017
Open to the Public
Kirner-Johnson 127 Red Pit

John R. Clarke, the Annie Laurie Howard Regents Professor in Fine Arts at the University of Texas at Austin, presents "The Oplontis Project: New Paradigms for Interdisciplinary Research in the Digital Humanities," as part of the Digital Humanities Initiative Speaker Series "Immersive and Virtual Worlds in the Digital Humanities."

How can digital tools advance archaeological research? In this lecture, Clarke demonstrates how interactive 3D models, linked databases, and digital publication have constituted a quantum leap for a UNESCO World Heritage site. Since 2006, Clarke has directed the Oplontis Project, an international collaborative study of two Roman villas, casualties of the same eruption of Vesuvius that buried Pompeii in 79 AD. The Project has developed a navigable 3D model using the Unity gaming engine to reconstruct the fragmentary fresco decorations and monumental sculptures and to test hypotheses about the movement of visitors and servants through the huge luxury villa. Because the model is linked to the Project database, a user can click on any feature, such as an individual painting or excavation, and bring up all the associated data. The results of the research of 46 scholars, representing disciplines ranging from geological sciences to art history, are appearing in open-access, born digital e-books. Together, the model, database, and e-books constitute a new methodology to bring together scientific and humanistic disciplines in the public realm.

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Angel (Angel David) Nieves
AMERICAN STUDIES
anieves@hamilton.edu 20170327 12:00:00 20170327 13:00:00 America/New_York DHi Speaker Series 2017 <p>John R. Clarke, the Annie Laurie Howard Regents Professor in Fine Arts at the University of Texas at Austin, presents "The Oplontis Project: New Paradigms for Interdisciplinary Research in the Digital Humanities," as part of the Digital Humanities Initiative Speaker Series "Immersive and Virtual Worlds in the Digital Humanities."</p> <p>How can digital tools advance archaeological research? In this lecture, Clarke demonstrates how interactive 3D models, linked databases, and digital publication have constituted a quantum leap for a UNESCO World Heritage site. Since 2006, Clarke has directed the Oplontis Project, an international collaborative study of two Roman villas, casualties of the same eruption of Vesuvius that buried Pompeii in 79 AD. The Project has developed a navigable 3D model using the Unity gaming engine to reconstruct the fragmentary fresco decorations and monumental sculptures and to test hypotheses about the movement of visitors and servants through the huge luxury villa. Because the model is linked to the Project database, a user can click on any feature, such as an individual painting or excavation, and bring up all the associated data. The results of the research of 46 scholars, representing disciplines ranging from geological sciences to art history, are appearing in open-access, born digital e-books. Together, the model, database, and e-books constitute a new methodology to bring together scientific and humanistic disciplines in the public realm.</p> Kirner-Johnson 127 Red Pit Angel (Angel David) Nieves anieves@hamilton.edu
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