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Nieves Awarded Second NEH Grant


Angel Nieves
Angel Nieves

Angel David Nieves, associate professor of Africana studies and co-director of the Digital Humanities Initiative (DHi) was awarded an NEH Office of Digital Humanities Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities Summer Institutes Grant of $245,299 for “Space and Place in Africana/Black Studies: An Institute on Spatial Humanities Theories, Methods and Practice.” 

The award is for a three-week long institute during the summer of 2016 to think critically about the relationship and intersections between Africana studies and the spatial humanities.  Kim Gallon (Purdue University) and Nieves are the lead Co-PIs on this award.  The grant is one of only three NEH Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities Summer Institutes awarded nationally.  This is Nieves’ second NEH award over the past two years.  

From the project abstract: “Hosted by the African American Studies & Research Center (AARC) at Purdue University, this three-week long institute during the summer of 2016 is designed to advance knowledge in Africana/Black Studies by affording 20 early and mid-career Africana/Black Studies scholars an opportunity to think critically about the relationship and intersections between Africana Studies and the spatial humanities. To that end, the Institute is concerned with helping participants to think spatially, to internalize the concept of space, and to develop spatial literacies. 

“The Institute will also advance digital and spatial humanities approaches among Africana/Black Studies scholars. Participants will explore key topics in spatial humanities and will be introduced to a breadth of geospatial technologies.  The web-based platform, BlackDH.org will serve as a clearinghouse and portal for scholarly discussions that will grow out of the Institute.  During the three weeks, the participants will examine and consider spatial theory, methods and technologies.  Unlike the traditional conference model, which allows for brief and often disparate engagement with issues around race in the digital humanities, the Institute provides for hands-on activities and sustained discussions over an intensive three-week period.  The follow-up workshop will take place in 2017 at Hamilton College.”

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