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Gwen Simmons '10 at Geological Society meeting.
Gwen Simmons '10 Presents Paper at Geological Society Conference
Gwen Simmons ’10 presented a poster at the Northeastern/Southeastern Geological Society of America Joint Section Meeting held in Baltimore on March 15. She was in the Modern Surface Processes Session of the conference. Simmons' poster was titled “Beach Nourishment on Hilton Head Island, South Carolina.” The work was based on her senior thesis with Prof. Cynthia Domack in the Hamilton College Geosciences Department.
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Geoscience seniors Lisa Feuerstein, Leila Malcom and Megan Fung in Baltimore.
Geosciences Seniors Present Posters at Baltimore Meeting
Lisa Feuerstein ’10, Leila Malcom ’10, and Megan Fung ’10 presented posters at the Northeastern/Southeastern Geological Society of America Joint Section Meeting held in Baltimore on March 15. All three were in the Geologic Education and History session of the conference. More ...
Garrett Armbruster '10
Garrett Armbruster ’10 Presents at Northeastern Storm Conference Meeting
Garrett Armbruster ’10 presented a poster titled “ Forecasting Lake Effect Precipitation for Upstate New York” at the 35th Annual Northeastern Storm Conference held in Saratoga, N.Y., on March 6. The American Meteorological Society, the National Weather Service, and Lyndon State College sponsored the conference. The work Armbruster presented was based on his senior thesis with Prof. Cynthia Domack in the Hamilton College Geosciences Department and an internship with meteorologist Adam Musyt at WKTV, Utica. More ...
Barbara Tewksbury
Tewksbury and Colleagues Awarded National Prize for Online Teaching Resources Web Site
Barbara Tewksbury, the Upson Chair for Public Discourse and Professor of Geosciences, is part of a team that has won a national award for a web site that they have developed over the past eight years to improve undergraduate geoscience education. The Web site On the Cutting Edge: Professional Development for Geoscience Faculty, has been awarded the 2009 Science Prize for Online Resources in Education (SPORE) by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and Science magazine. More ...
Senior geoscience majors Megan Fung and Lisa Feuerstein.
Clinton Elementary Students Dig Class With Hamilton Geoscience Majors
Two Hamilton geoscience majors provided a hands-on learning experience for Clinton Central School (CCS) elementary students last semester as part of their senior thesis projects. Lisa Feuerstein '10 and Megan Fung '10 developed independent projects with their own self-designed curriculums that involved teaching at the local elementary school. More ...
A view from the bow of the boat while crossing the Drake Passage in  April 2009.
Climate Change is Focus of Complex Antarctic Expedition
More than 30 scientists from 11 states and four countries, led by Hamilton College Geosciences Professor Eugene Domack, will embark in January 2010 upon one of the most complex interdisciplinary Antarctic expeditions ever funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF). During the two-month trip the scientists will be addressing a significant regional problem with global change implications, the abrupt environmental change in Antarctica's Larsen Ice Shelf System. The expedition is part of the NSF’s International Polar Year (IPY) program. More ...
Allie Hutchison '10 and Lisa Feuerstein '10
Kimberlites of Central New York Are Focus of Summer Research
Hamilton graduate Oren Root (1803-1885) was the first to find igneous, volcanic rocks known as kimberlites in New York State. In 1881, he retired as Professor Emeritus of Mathematics, Mineralogy and Geology at Hamilton, and left a legacy of sage and introspective research for future students and faculty to imitate. This summer, Alexandra Hutchison ’10 and Lisa Feuerstein ’10 are expanding on the study of kimberlites across Central New York and the eastern states. They are working with Associate Professor of Geosciences David Bailey to determine why kimberlites exist in certain places and where they came from. Their projects have slightly different aims, but both revolve around the effort to discern the more reliable theories from those with not enough evidence. More ...
 Isabelle Cannell ’11 and Natalie Elking '12
Students Seek Alternative Energy Source in Chile
The Patagonia region of Chile has some of the highest wind potentials in the world, peaking at nearly 200,000 megawatts of power and sweeping by at five or 10 meters per second. Natalie Elking ’12 and Isabelle Cannell ’11 began to develop an interest in this obvious but overlooked source of energy after writing a group paper on what they believed was the proper approach to wilderness conservation in Patagonia. J. W. Johnson Family Professor of Geosciences Eugene Domack taught the course, and expressed interest in editing their paper and trying to get it published. As the topic moved more into the realm of wind and tidal power issues, Domack suggested a trip to Chile to investigate the matter. Elking and Cannell agreed, and enthusiastically accompanied him this past May. More ...
Jonathan Traylor '10
Jonathan Traylor '10 Looks Beneath Surface at Cannon Point
To the east of North America are the White Mountains of New Hampshire. To the north, the Monteregian Hills of Quebec. Just west of these is Cannon Point, a cape on Lake Champlain near Essex, N.Y. These three formations typify the uncommon magmatic activity (behavior of molten rock) in the Northeast. Moving past Cannon Point to the west, a person would be hard pressed to find any magmatic features before coming upon the magnificent Rocky Mountains. That makes Cannon Point a rarity among eastern rock structures, and its magnetic igneous intrusions make up the western-most activity of the region. Jonathan Traylor ’10 is studying these rocks to see what they might say about regional magmatic activity that dates back to the Cretaceous period. More ...
Eugene Domack
Domack Presents Invited Talk in Korea
Eugene Domack, the J. W. Johnson Family Professor of Geosciences, attended the 16th International Symposium on Polar Sciences in June in Incheon, Korea, where he presented an invited talk titled “Larsen Ice Shelf System (LARISSA): A Multi-disciplinary Earth Systems Approach to Antarctic Environmental Change.” More ...
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