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Michael Schmidt '10
Michael Schmidt ’10 Joins Forces with Robert Moses ’56 in Algebra Project Internship
Born in Harlem, educated at Hamilton then Harvard, civil rights leader Dr. Robert P. Moses’ life is an inspirational story in the style of 19th century Horatio Alger novels. He graduated from Hamilton in 1956 and founded The Algebra Project (AP) in 1982 as a means to advance public school education, especially in mathematics, for every child. He and the people at The Algebra Project feel that every child is entitled to a proper education in order to succeed in an increasingly technology-based society. More ...
Jacobus Van Der Ven's '11 winning poster.
Jacobus Van Der Ven ’11 Computer Security Awareness Poster Wins EDUCAUSE First Prize
A poster created by Jacobus Van Der Ven ’11 was selected as a 1st place gold prize winner in the 2009 Computer Security Awareness Poster and Video Contest by the EDUCAUSE/Internet 2 Computer and Network Security Task Force. Van Der Ven received a cash award of $1000 for his poster titled “Is Your Computer Healthy?” More ...
Allie Hutchison '10 and Lisa Feuerstein '10
Kimberlites of Central New York Are Focus of Summer Research
Hamilton graduate Oren Root (1803-1885) was the first to find igneous, volcanic rocks known as kimberlites in New York State. In 1881, he retired as Professor Emeritus of Mathematics, Mineralogy and Geology at Hamilton, and left a legacy of sage and introspective research for future students and faculty to imitate. This summer, Alexandra Hutchison ’10 and Lisa Feuerstein ’10 are expanding on the study of kimberlites across Central New York and the eastern states. They are working with Associate Professor of Geosciences David Bailey to determine why kimberlites exist in certain places and where they came from. Their projects have slightly different aims, but both revolve around the effort to discern the more reliable theories from those with not enough evidence. More ...
2nd Annual Hamilton Serves! is a Success
Members of Hamilton's class of 2013 will have a quick orientation to the area that will be their home for the next four years when they embark on the second Hamilton Serves! volunteer orientation effort on Aug. 26. All 466 first-year students will spend four hours volunteering at 46 non-profit agencies in the area. More ...
Yinghan Ding '12 (right) with his advisor Margaret Morgan-Davie.
Yinghan Ding ’12 Charts Ups and Downs of Airline Ticket Prices
Yinghan Ding ’12 is an international student at Hamilton, and so are some of his friends. When it comes time to head home for winter break, they might want to heed his advice about buying airline tickets.  By the end of the summer, Ding will be practically an expert on the topic. In the spring, he received an Emerson Grant to study price fluctuations in the airline industries. Because the Airline Deregulation Act of 1978 eliminated most of the U.S. government’s interference in the economic standing of airlines, Ding is curious to see whether or not the government needs to become reacquainted with airline regulation in order to achieve stable prices that will benefit both consumers and the industry. More ...
Students started lining up at 7:30 a.m. for the tent sale.
Tons of Stuff at Cram & Scram Tent Sale

They were lined up at 7 a.m. A passer-by might assume that the hundreds of Hamilton students in North Lot on August 25 were there to buy tickets for a popular band’s concert or to take advantage of a free giveaway. But the students gave new meaning to “reduce, reuse and recycle” as they turned out by the hundreds for the 2nd annual Ham Cram & Scram tent sale. Cram & Scram is a reuse/recycle program aimed at reducing end-of-the-year waste; residence hall items were collected at the end of the spring semester, stored over the summer and tagged at bargain basement prices to be snapped up at the two-day tent sale.  More ...

Julia Mulcrone '11
Julia Mulcrone ’11 Magazine Internship Sets Stage for Journalism Career
Journalism is the world’s transcript – the records accumulate but never disappear, even if we persistently try to ignore them. Julia Mulcrone ’11 says that in this way, journalism is “extremely important because it is the medium through which people learn about the world—it’s hard not to care about.” This summer, in preparation for a career in journalism, she is interning for Today’s Chicago Woman magazine, which has a target audience of women in their 30s to 50s. They offered her an unpaid position, however, so she applied for and received a stipend from the Joseph F. Anderson '44 Internship Fund, which helps students who have full-time, unpaid internships cover outside expenses.
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Matt Russell ’11 Programs Comp. Sci. Editing Tool
A written assignment can be deceiving. Even if the finished product is immaculate, the student might have put in many hours of work in order to get it to that point. On the other hand, holes in a student’s argument indicate that he either rushed through that portion of his analysis or toiled over its synthesis for longer than necessary. Matt Russell ’11 sees this as a problem for educators who are trying to help their students understand classroom material. If they cannot see what areas on which their students are spending an inordinate amount of time, they cannot help them improve. This summer, Russell worked with Associate Professor of Computer Science Mark Bailey to design a computer program that will visually represent the time spent on certain aspects of computer programming. 
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Pablo Abreu '10 (left) with William Hajjar, his supervisor at Wunderman.
Pablo Abreu ’10 Juggles Numbers in Direct Marketing Agency Internship
Pablo Abreu ’10 describes an “awakening” that occurred during his junior year. Up until that point, his heart was set on working with people in the health care industry. But after speaking to Daniel Custódio ’00 and Sandra Revueltas ’05, he decided to shift the course of his ambitions. Now he wants to pursue a career in business, which will give him a similar sense of direct contact with people. This summer, he is interning at Wunderman, the largest direct marketing agency and one of the top 10 direct and digital agencies in the world. More ...
 Isabelle Cannell ’11 and Natalie Elking '12
Students Seek Alternative Energy Source in Chile
The Patagonia region of Chile has some of the highest wind potentials in the world, peaking at nearly 200,000 megawatts of power and sweeping by at five or 10 meters per second. Natalie Elking ’12 and Isabelle Cannell ’11 began to develop an interest in this obvious but overlooked source of energy after writing a group paper on what they believed was the proper approach to wilderness conservation in Patagonia. J. W. Johnson Family Professor of Geosciences Eugene Domack taught the course, and expressed interest in editing their paper and trying to get it published. As the topic moved more into the realm of wind and tidal power issues, Domack suggested a trip to Chile to investigate the matter. Elking and Cannell agreed, and enthusiastically accompanied him this past May. More ...
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