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Members of the History of Civil War class recite the Gettysburg Address.
Isserman Class Records Gettysburg Address for Ken Burns' Project

To celebrate the 150th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address on Nov. 19, Maurice Isserman’s History of the Civil War class (History 215) took part in filmmaker Ken Burns’ project “Learn the Address.” Isserman is the Publius Virgilius Rogers Professor of American History.  More ...

Cronkite's War: His World War II Letters Home
CBS This Morning to Feature Isserman and Walter Cronkite IV

CBS This Morning Saturday will feature an interview with Publius Virgilius Rogers Professor of American History Maurice Isserman and his former student Walter Cronkite IV ’11 about their new book Cronkite's War: His World War II Letters Home. The segment is tentatively scheduled to air at 7:45 a.m.  More ...

Religious Freedom: Jefferson's Legacy, America's Creed
Ragosta Featured on WAMC's Academic Minute

WAMC/Northeast Public Radio’s Academic Minute will feature Visiting Assistant Professor of History John Ragosta's essay on National Day of Prayer on Thursday, May 2. Ragosta, author of the newly published Religious Freedom: Jefferson's Legacy, America's Creed, provides a brief summary of the role of prayer in U.S. history. The broadcast can be heard locally at 7:34 a.m. or 3:56 p.m. at 90.3 FM and at InsideHigherEd.com.  More ...

John Ragosta
Huffington Post Publishes Ragosta Essay

In response to an attack on CIA Director John Brennan for taking the oath of office with a hand on George Washington's copy of the Constitution rather than the Bible, Visiting Assistant Professor of History John Ragosta wrote a response in an essay published by The Huffington Post. In “Bravo for Brennan!,” which appeared on the publication’s website on March 14,  Ragosta explained that “The Constitution does not require that a Bible be used for the oath of office.  More ...

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