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Classics

Classics is the study of the languages and civilizations of ancient Greece and Rome, as well as of related civilizations, both ancient and modern. The department offers courses in ancient Greek and Latin and also in classical studies, where no knowledge of Latin or Greek is required. Students wishing to concentrate or minor in classics may take one of two directions.

A concentration in classical languages, which emphasizes work in Latin and Greek as keys to understanding the ancient world, requires a minimum of 11 full-credit courses. Four of those courses, at least two of which must be numbered 300 or above, should be in one of the two languages; and three of them, at least one of which must be numbered 300 or above, should be in the other. Two courses in classical studies, in addition to 550, the Senior Project, are also required. (With the approval of the department, exemptions to these requirements may be made for students who come to Hamilton with substantial preparation in Latin or Greek.) Students concentrating in classical languages are also required to complete at least one course each year in Greek or Latin. Because the language concentration requires substantial accomplishment in both Greek and Latin, prospective concentrators entering the College with no knowledge of those languages should make an immediate start with the prerequisite 100- and 200-level courses.

A concentration in classical studies, which offers a study of ancient Greece and Rome with emphasis on only one of the languages, requires a minimum of eight full-credit courses. Six of those courses should be in classical studies, at least four of them numbered 200 or above and at least one numbered 300 or above. One course numbered 300 or above in either Latin or Greek is also required, along with 550, the Senior Project. (With the approval of the department, certain courses in Greek or Latin may be substituted for classical studies courses). In addition, students concentrating in classical studies must complete at least one course each year in classical studies, Greek or Latin.

Hamilton is a member of the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome (the Centro) and of the American School of Classical Studies in Athens. Many students have also attended other programs in Rome and Athens. Concentrators and other students trained in Latin or Greek are encouraged to spend one or two semesters of their junior year in a program in Greece or Rome or in another suitable program abroad. Interested students should note that admission to the Intercollegiate Center and the American School is competitive and that preparation in Latin or Greek, and sometimes both, is an important factor in determining admission.

Students who have earned an A- (90) average in the concentration may receive honors by earning a grade of A- in the Senior Seminar. A description of the program may be obtained from any member of the classics faculty.

A minor in classical languages requires at least two courses numbered 300 or above in Latin or Greek, as well as two courses in classical studies, one of which must be numbered 200 or above. Because the language minor requires advanced work in either Latin or Greek, interested students entering the College without either of those languages should make an early start with the prerequisite 100- and 200-level courses.

A minor in classical studies requires a minimum of five classical studies courses, three of which must be numbered 200 or above, with at least one numbered 300 or above, and one year of college Latin or Greek or a grade of B or higher in a 200- or 300-level course in Latin or Greek.

Classical Studies

110F The Civilizations of Greece and the Near East.
An introduction to the legacy of ancient Greece and the Near East through the study of history, literature, philosophy and art.

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[120] Roman Civilization.
An introduction to the history and culture of ancient Rome. Stress on social history and basic skills in the study of history.

[130] Socrates, Cleopatra and the Caesars.
An introduction to classical studies and the ancient Mediterranean world that focuses on some pivotal figures. Consideration of the multiple facets of ancient Mediterranean society and culture, including multiculturalism, race, class and gender. Attention to literature, art, religion, philosophy and history. Readings from ancient and modern sources, and films dealing with the world of the ancient Greeks and Romans. Not open to students who have taken Classics 100.

135S The Classics on Film.
A study of films reflecting ancient Greek and Roman themes, including westerns (such as Unforgiven and The Searchers), works of science fiction (such as Star Wars and Blade Runner), detective stories (such as The Maltese Falcon), and films explicitly based on Greek and Roman sources (such as Spartacus and O Brother, Where Art Thou). Classical texts will be juxtaposed with their film representations, there will be readings from modern writers on film and the classics, and attention will be given to the way in which films about the ancient world reflect the times in which they were made. (Same as Cinema and Media Studies 135.) Rubino.

201F History of Ancient Western Philosophy.
A study of the philosophical classics from early Greek times to the Renaissance. Emphasis on Plato and Aristotle. Section 01 is lecture only. Other sections are writing intensive and registration priority is given to junior and senior philosophy concentrators (limit 20; with an additional weekly discussion session). (Same as Philosophy 201.) Werner.

205S Pompeii.
This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to the field of classical studies, focused through the Roman site of Pompeii and the eruption of Vesuvius in 70 CE. Through Pompeii, its destruction, and its remarkable level of preservation, we will study the art, architecture, archaeology, literature, philosophy, religion, history, daily life, sexuality, food, and social structures of Rome, as well as the place of Rome in the modern imagination. Through this diverse immersion in Roman history and culture, students will gain a comprehensive overview of the many approaches and sub-disciplines represented within classical studies. Jesse Weiner.

[215] Man and Nature in the Ancient World.
Study of ancient Mediterranean conceptualizations of the Earth, the peoples who inhabited it, and the complex relationship among humans, animals and nature. Emphasis on ancient texts in translation. Topics include concepts of space, impact of environment on man and vice versa, identity and "Other," cartography and cosmology. Readings primarily from Greek and Roman sources, but including Babylonian, Hebrew, Carthaginian and Christian texts, as well as ancient China. (Writing-intensive.) Maximum enrollment, 20.

235S Greek Archaeology: A Look At the Past.
A study of major archaeological excavations and material remains of ancient Greece from the Bronze Age through the Hellenistic Period, with particular attention to the relationship between material remains and political and cultural history. Examines the exchange of archaeological and artistic influences with contemporary cultures of Europe, Africa and Asia. (Writing-intensive.) Maximum enrollment, 20. Feltovich.

240F Classical Mythology.
An introduction to ancient mythology through readings from sources such as Gilgamesh, Egyptian mythology, Homer, Hesiod, Greek tragedy, Herodotus, Livy, Ovid and contemporary mythmakers. Origins, creation myths, divinities and heroes, and mystery religions. (Same as Religious Studies 240.) Feltovich.

242F The Classical Tradition in American Political Life: Cicero, Hamilton, Jefferson and the Making of the Republic.
A study of ancient Greek and Roman influences on the creation of the United States, with special attention to the influence of Cicero and the rivalry between Alexander Hamilton and Thomas Jefferson. Readings include biographies of and writings by all three figures. Not open to students who have taken Classics 270. (Same as Government 242.) Anechiarico and Rubino.

244F Tragedy: Then and Now.
How did Greek tragedy work in the city of Athens? Athens was a radical democracy but was based on slave labor and the exclusion of women. How is this implied contradiction displayed in the works of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides? But tragedy also has contemporary life. How do these plays transcend their time of production? An opportunity to examine relations of gods/humans, fate/choice, as well as gender, class/ethnicity and sexuality. Readings to include works by Seneca, Racine, Sartre, O’Neill, Heaney, Fugard. (Writing-intensive.) (Same as Comparative Literature 244 and Theatre 244.) Maximum enrollment, 20. N Rabinowitz.

[250] Heroism Ancient and Modern.
An examination of ancient and modern views of the hero. Consideration of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, Vergil's Aeneid, modern works such as Voltaire's Candide and films such as Shane, The Maltese Falcon, Blade Runner, Joan the Maid and the Star Wars series. (Oral Presentations.)

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[260] Power and Corruption in Ancient Rome.
An examination of personal and political corruption in ancient Rome, with particular attention to the manner in which it is depicted by writers such as Sallust, Livy, Horace, Tacitus and Juvenal. Some attention to depictions of corruption in modern America, especially to Robert Caro's portrayals of Robert Moses and Lyndon Johnson.

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261S Art of Ancient Greece and Rome.
An examination of Mediterranean art from the Bronze Age through the Roman Empire. Special emphasis on the archaeological discovery and reshaping of ancient art by later scholars and the concept of the "classical." (Writing-intensive.) Prerequisite, one course in art history or classics. (Same as Art History 261.) Maximum enrollment, 20. McEnroe.

[280] Ancient Comedy.
Readings of Greek and Roman comedies in English translation: Aristophanes, Plautus, Terence, Lucian, Apulieus, mime. Discussions of why and for whom comedy is funny, comedic perspective, theories of humor, roles of women and slaves in comedy, cultural values, themes and plots, history of comedy, staging and theatrical technique. May also include class production of a play.

[308] Reclaiming an Ancient African Past.
Examines the ancient evidence for the Afrocentric claim of the African genesis of Western civilization. Also explores the modern political context of and debate around the backlash of eurocentric scholars against these claims as well as the epistemological framing of the sociology of knowledge. (Writing-intensive.) (Same as Africana Studies 308.) Maximum enrollment, 20.

[320] The Romans on Film.
Critical examination of films such as Spartacus, Julius Caesar, The Last Temptation of Christ, Ben Hur, I Claudius, Fellini Satyricon, The Fall of the Roman Empire and Gladiator. Readings from ancient writers such as Plutarch, Tacitus and Suetonius, as well as from selected modern sources. Prerequisite, one course in Latin, Greek or classical studies.

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325S Sexuality and Gender in Greece and Rome.
This course examines issues of sex, sexuality, and gender in the ancient societies of Greece and Rome through the study of literature, art, sociology, and science. We will investigate the representation of gender cross-culturally over time to learn what we know, and what we can’t know, about the lives of ancient men and women, their interaction, communication and their roles in culture and society. Particular attention will be given to the lives of women, whose voices are often underrepresented in Greek and Roman literature and historical records. Prerequisite, 1 course in Classics or Women's Studies. Jesse Weiner.

[330] Food and Dining in the Roman World.
An introduction to ancient Roman culture and social history from the perspective of food, including what foodstuffs were common in ancient Rome, where they came from, how they were used, and what their use and availability tell us about the social status of their consumers. Readings, individual student presentations and research projects, as well as hands-on preparation of food using ancient Roman recipes. (Writing-intensive.) Prerequisite, one course in classical studies, Greek or Latin, or consent of instructor. Maximum enrollment, 20.

[335] Trafficking in the Classics.
Investigates how, and why, ancient Greek and Roman literature and art has influenced the history of literature, art and ideas since antiquity, with special emphasis upon comparing post-classical texts, artwork and performances with their classical sources of inspiration and provocation. Topics and readings vary according to the focus of the course in a given semester. (Writing-intensive.) Prerequisite, one course in Latin, Greek or classical studies, or consent of instructor. Maximum enrollment, 20.

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[340] Women in Antiquity.
An examination of women’s roles in the ancient world through various sources: history, archaeology, law, literature and art. Covers the period from early Greece through classical Greece and down to Rome, and traces the shifts in attitudes during these periods. (Writing-intensive.) Prerequisite, one course in Latin, Greek, classical studies or women's studies. (Same as Women's Studies 340.) Maximum enrollment, 20.

[341] Women, Gender and Power in Ancient Egypt and Greece.
An interdisciplinary study of the varying degrees and types of power available to women in ancient Egypt and Greece. Students will analyze evidence from art, archaeology, classical literature, history and sociology to interpret the social construction of race, gender, class and sexuality in these ancient societies. (Writing-intensive.) Prerequisite, one course in Latin, Greek, classical studies or women's studies. (Same as Women's Studies 341.) Maximum enrollment, 20.

[342] Women, Gender and Power in Ancient Rome and Byzantium.
An interdisciplinary study of the women of ancient Rome and Byzantium. Examines evidence from art, archaeology, classical literature, history and sociology to interpret the social construction of race, gender, class and sexuality in these ancient societies. From the empress to her freedwoman, the good wife to the prostitute, the midwife to the scholar, uncovers women's authentic voices. (Writing-intensive.) Prerequisite, one course in Latin, Greek, classical studies or women's studies. Maximum enrollment, 20.

[350] Ethics and Politics in Ancient Greece and Rome.
A study of Greek and Roman attitudes toward the question of private and public behavior, concentrating on such topics as the meaning of success, the use of power, the function of language in political life, the relationship between the individual and the state, and the role of the state in regulating behavior. Contemporary applications. Readings from Thucydides, Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Sallust and Tacitus. (Oral Presentations.) Prerequisite, one course in Latin, Greek, classical studies, political theory, philosophy or consent of instructor.

[372] Unraveling Cleopatra.
Cleopatra was a witness to and a shaper of the history of ancient Egypt and the late Roman Republic. To posterity the historical Cleopatra is an enigma, but her image in film, literature, art and popular culture is ever present. Through authors such as Horace, Plutarch, Shakespeare and George Bernard Shaw and through cinematic treatments from the 1940s-1970s, explores how the historical figure of Cleopatra became both the signifier and embodiment of sexual and racial politics across historical periods. (Writing-intensive.) Prerequisite, one course in classical studies or Africana studies. (Same as Africana Studies 372 and Women's Studies 372.) Maximum enrollment, 20.

[374] Ancient Egypt.
A study of the history of ancient Egypt and of its interaction with other ancient African kingdoms, including Nubia, Kush and Punt. Examination of Egypt’s prehistory, language, social and gender relations, and cultural development. (Writing-intensive.) Prerequisite, 240 or Africana Studies 101. (Same as Africana Studies 374.) Maximum enrollment, 20.

550S Senior Seminar.
Topics to be arranged. Open only to senior concentrators. Maximum enrollment, 12. Rubino.

Greek

110S Elementary Greek I.
An introduction to the language and culture of Greece and the ancient Mediterranean. Thorough grounding in the grammar, syntax and vocabulary of ancient Greek. Reading and discussion of elementary passages from classical or New Testament Greek that cast light on ancient Mediterranean society and culture. For those with no previous knowledge of Greek. Three class meetings a week, in addition to a drill session.

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120F Elementary Greek II.
Continuation of Greek 110. Further study of grammar, syntax and vocabulary, accompanied by reading and discussion of passages from classical or New Testament Greek that cast light on ancient Mediterranean society and culture. For students who have completed Greek 110 or those who have had some Greek but require review. Three class meetings a week, in addition to a drill session. The Department.

210S Intermediate Greek: The World of Greece and the Ancient Mediterranean.
Reading and discussion, with grammar review, of intermediate-level passages from classical, Hellenistic or New Testament Greek selected to illuminate the history, society and culture of Greece and the ancient Mediterranean. Readings from the New Testament and from writers such as Xenophon and Lucian. Prerequisite, knowledge of elementary Greek. (Same as Religious Studies 210.)

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[340] Homer and the Greek Hero.
Reading from Homer's Iliad and Odyssey in the original Greek. Consideration of the Greek concept of heroism and the role of epic poetry, with attention to the society and culture of the Homeric world. Prerequisite, knowledge of intermediate Greek.

[350] The Greek Historians.
The story of ancient Greece as told in the words of the Greeks themselves. Readings, in the original Greek, from Herodotus, Thucydides and Xenophon. Attention to the wider issues of ancient Mediterranean society and culture. Prerequisite, knowledge of intermediate Greek.

360S Greek Drama.
Readings, in the original Greek, from the tragedians Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides and from the comic playwrights Aristophanes and Menander. Attention to matters such as the role of women and slaves, social and cultural values, and theories of tragedy and comedy. Prerequisite, knowledge of intermediate Greek.

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390F Topics in Ancient Greek Society and Culture.
Reading and discussion of original Greek texts that cast light on the history, society and culture of Greece and the ancient Mediterranean. Authors and topics vary; may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite, knowledge of intermediate Greek.

Latin

110F Elementary Latin I.
An introduction to the language and culture of ancient Rome. Thorough grounding in Latin grammar, syntax and vocabulary. Reading and discussion of elementary passages that cast light on the society and culture of ancient Rome and its empire. No knowledge of Latin required. Three class meetings a week, in addition to a drill session. Haley.

120S Elementary Latin II.
Continuation of Latin 110. Further study of grammar, syntax and vocabulary, accompanied by reading and discussion of passages that cast light on the society and culture of ancient Rome and its empire. For students who have completed Latin 110 or those who have had some Latin but require review. Three class meetings a week, in addition to a drill session. Haley.

210F Intermediate Latin: The World of Ancient Rome.
Reading and discussion, with grammar review, of intermediate-level Latin passages selected to illuminate the history, society and culture of ancient Rome and its empire. Readings from writers such as Caesar, Cicero, Sallust, Catullus, Ovid and Martial. Prerequisite, knowledge of elementary Latin. Rubino.

[340S] The Roman Hero.
Readings, in the original Latin, from Vergil's Aeneid and other Roman epics. Consideration of the nature of heroism and epic poetry, with attention to the history, society and culture of the Roman world. Prerequisite, knowledge of intermediate Latin.

350S The Roman Historians.
The story of ancient Rome and its empire as told in the words of the Romans themselves. Readings, in the original Latin, from Sallust, Livy, Tacitus and other historians. Prerequisite, knowledge of intermediate Latin.

[360] The Literature of Love and Desire.
Readings, in the original Latin, from the love poetry of Catullus, Horace, Tibullus, Propertius and Ovid. Attention to Greek influences on Roman love poetry, to its Roman context and to the Roman influence of subsequent notions of love and erotic poetry. Prerequisite, knowledge of intermediate Latin.

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[370] Letters, Society and History.
Readings, in the original Latin, from the letters of such writers as Cicero, Pliny and Seneca. Attention to the ways in which those letters cast light on Roman society and the movement of history. Prerequisite, knowledge of intermediate Latin.

390F Topics in Roman Society and Culture.
Reading and discussion of original Latin texts that cast light on the history, society and culture of Rome and the ancient Mediterranean. Authors and topics vary; may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite, knowledge of intermediate Latin. Feltovich.

(from the Hamilton Course Catalogue)

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