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Courses and Requirements

NOTE: The requirements for the concentrations and minors in comparative literature outlined in this section pertain to students in the classes of 2016 and 2017. Beginning with the Class of 2018, students pursuing the study of comparative literature and/or English and creative writing will take courses through the Literature and Creative Writing Department. See that department for more information. For more information about comparative literature contact Nancy Rabinowitz at nrabinow@hamilton.edu.

A concentration in comparative literature consists of nine courses, including five designated as comparative literature, two in a national literature in the original language (e.g., Chinese, Russian, Greek) and two in either a second national literature in the original language or in linguistics or in a related art (music, dance, visual arts, or film and media studies) selected in consultation with a departmental advisor. Students pursuing the linguistics or related arts option must complete study in a foreign language to the 140 level or equivalent. All concentrators are required to take 211 or 212, and 297, and all senior concentrators will take part in a Senior Program in which 500 (Senior Seminar) is required and 550 (Senior Project) is recommended. A complete description of the Senior Program is available from the department chair. Only one 100-level course may be counted toward the concentration. It is to the student’s advantage to begin foreign language study early; those planning graduate work in literature are urged to take two additional courses in a national literature and to study two foreign languages.

Honors in comparative literature will be awarded on the basis of a cumulative record of 3.5 (90) or above in all courses counting toward the major, as well as distinguished performance in 550.

A minor consists of five courses, including either 211, 212 or 297; two other courses designated as comparative literature; and two other courses in comparative, English or foreign literature, or linguistics. Only two 100-level courses may be counted toward the minor.

Many courses at the 200-level are open to seniors without prerequisites. For details, see the specific descriptions below.

[120S] Introduction to the History and Theory of Film.
A general introduction to the wide world of cinema and cinema studies, focusing on crucial films from many cinematic traditions. Topics include the evolution of film from earlier forms of motion picture, the articulation and exploitation of a narrative language for cinema, the development of typical commercial genres, and the appearance of a variety of forms of critical cinema. Focuses on basic film terminology, with the cinematic apparatus and ongoing theoretical conversation about cinema and its audience. (Same as Cinema and Media Studies 120 and Art History 120.)

[143] Literature on Trials.
Why are trials so fascinating? Our emphasis will be on the ways they clarify values, establishing borders between acceptable and unacceptable behavior, with attention to how they enforce cultural norms concerning race, gender, and sexuality. We will discuss literary and cultural representations of historical trials, such as those of Socrates, Joan of Arc, Galileo, the Salem Witches, and Oscar Wilde. Course materials to include readings from Aeschylus, Plato, Shaw, Brecht, Stendhal, Kafka, Camus, Morrison, as well as films and other primary and secondary sources. (Writing-intensive.) (Proseminar.) (Theme or Identity and Difference) Open to first-year students only. Maximum enrollment, 16.

146S (Re)Discovering Latin American in Literature.
In 1492 Columbus sailed the ocean blue… to unfamiliar lands that were shocking, provocative and elusive. This course examines the ‘discovery’ of America, transcultural encounters, and the myths of/from America (paradise, utopia & lost cities of gold) in literature. Readings span from Mesoamerican stories (Aztec, Maya, Inca), New World voices (Inca Garcilaso, Guamán Poma) to modern Latin American writers & artists (Borges, Saer, Carpentier, Cortázar, Lam, Kahlo, Varos & others). (Writing-intensive.) Not open to students who have taken 100-level Comparative Literature, Literature or English courses. (History, Identity and Difference). Maximum enrollment, 20. N Serrano.

[152F] Literature and Ethics.
Study of literature as a vehicle for moral and political concerns and of the ways that literature shapes its readers. Special emphasis on popular literature, feminist criticism and the problems raised by censorship and pornography. Selected novels and plays by such writers as Ibsen, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Hemingway, Wright, Highsmith, Doris Lessing, Burgess and others. (Writing-intensive.) (Proseminar.) (Theme) Open to first-year students only. Maximum enrollment, 16.

[210S] Modern and Contemporary Chinese Literature: Traditions and Modernities.
Since 1919, Chinese literature has played a decisive role in interactions between tradition and modernity. This course examines the development of Chinese literature against such interactions. Students will familiarize themselves with the most representative modern and contemporary Chinese literary works and gain a broad understanding of many modernity-related issues, including politics, culture, class, labor division, ethnicity, gender and sexuality. All lectures and discussions in English. Requirements: presentations, class discussions, film viewings and a final paper. (Same as East Asian Languages and Literatures 210.)

211F Early Storytellers in World Literature.
Great ‘masterpieces’ have been inscribed on cave walls, papyrus, tapestries, parchment (goatskin), and paper in order to comment upon the world. This course examines the human condition through a comparative study of mythology, epic, narrative, and poetry, from ancient Mesopotamia and Greece to the Roman Empire through to the Renaissance period. It pays special attention to how sexuality, identity, and politics play in the representation of diverse societies in Innana, The Odyssey, The Golden Ass, El Cid, Les Lais, 1001 Nights, The Pillow Book, Veronica Franco’s poetry, and others. (Writing-intensive.) (History) Maximum enrollment, 20. N Serrano.

[212S] Readings in World Literature II.
Study of representative texts in world literature from 1800 to the present, including novels, short fiction, and drama. Particular attention paid to the concepts of class, self and society, and they way they are intertwined with forms of narrative and drama. Readings to include works by such writers as Goethe, Balzac, Austen, Chekhov, Kafka, Hagedorn, Roy. (Writing-intensive.) (History) May be taken without 211. Maximum enrollment, 20.

225F Madness, Murder and Mayhem: Nineteenth-Century Russian Literature.
Readings of representative works with emphasis on major literary movements, cultural history, and basic literary devices. Primary texts by Pushkin, Gogol, Turgenev, Dostoevsky and Tolstoy, as well as some critical materials. (Writing-intensive.) No knowledge of Russian required. (Same as Russian Studies 225.) Maximum enrollment, 20. Bartle.

[226S] Sex, Death and Revolution: Twentieth-Century Russian Art and Literature.
Close analysis of major literary and artistic movements of the 20th century, with particular attention paid to the innovations of the avant-garde and the impact of the Bolshevik Revolution on the artistic imagination. Emphasis on the recurring theme of the fate of the individual in a mass society. No knowledge of Russian required. (Same as Russian Studies 226.)

[234S] The Hero as Failure: Nineteenth-Century Russian Literature.
Why does so much classic Russian literature center on weak male protagonists unable to come to terms with stronger, more adaptable women? This course will explore this repeated pattern both as a reflection of Russian attitudes toward love and as a metaphorical expression of political frustration in a repressive society. Readings to include fiction, plays, and criticism by such writers as Pushkin, Lermontov, Belinsky, Gogol, Turgenev, Chernyshevsky, Dostoevsky, and Chekhov. Prerequisite, A 100-level course in literature. Open to students who have taken LIT/RSNST 225. (History, Theme) (Same as Russian Studies 234.)

[235] Love, Family and Loneliness in Modern Japanese Literature.
Love has always been a central theme in Japanese literature. Focuses on how Japanese writers of the modern period (particularly late 19th century to the present) depict the struggle with new concepts and forms of "love" and relationships. As well as basic readings about modern Japanese history and culture, assigned texts range from canonical work, various forms of early twentieth-century modernist mystery, technical and avant-garde writings, to contemporary "coming of age" novels. We will also examine such media as cartoons and films. Readings and discussion in English. (Same as East Asian Languages and Literatures 235.)

239/339F Modern Japan: Japanese Culture and Society From A(-Bomb) to (Dragon Ball)Z.
This course explores issues of imperialism, military conflict, pacifism, nuclear victimhood, foreign occupation, national identity, and social responsibility in 19th to 21st-century Japan. Materials include nonfiction, science fiction, poetry, war propaganda, novels, censorship documents, animé, and film. Taught in English. No knowledge of Japanese language or history required. (Same as East Asian Languages and Literatures 239/339.) Omori.

[244F] Tragedy: Then and Now.
How did Greek tragedy work in the city of Athens? Athens was a radical democracy but was based on slave labor and the exclusion of women. How is this implied contradiction displayed in the works of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides? But tragedy also has contemporary life. How do these plays transcend their time of production? An opportunity to examine relations of gods/humans, fate/choice, as well as gender, class/ethnicity and sexuality. Readings to include works by Seneca, Racine, Sartre, O’Neill, Heaney, Fugard. (Genre) (Same as Theatre 244 and Classics 244.)

[258/358S] Opera.
Study of literary and musical dimensions of operas by major composers from Monteverdi and Mozart to the present. Emphasis on the transformation of independent texts into librettos and the effects of music as it reflects language and dramatic action. Includes such works as Orfeo, The Marriage of Figaro, Otello, The Turn of the Screw and Candide. Prerequisite, two courses in music or two in literature, or one in each field, or consent of instructors. Music 358 has an additional independent project. Registration at the 300-level only with instructor's permission. (Same as Music 258/358 and Literature and Creative Writing 258/358 and Literature and Creative Writing 258/358.) Maximum enrollment, 24.

[270] Heaven, Hell and the Space in Between: Devils and Deities in Russian Literature and Art.
Examination of the portrayals of the cosmic conflict: Good vs. Evil, Heaven vs. Hell, God vs. Satan. The second half of the semester will be dedicated to a close reading and analysis of Fyodor Dostoevsky's Brothers Karamazov. (Writing-intensive.) No knowledge of Russian required. (Same as Russian Studies 270.) Maximum enrollment, 20.

[278S] The Straight Story?: Rethinking the Romance.
A study of the ways in which various forms of sexual desire (overt or closeted) drive the plot of literary works. How is desire constructed? How have authors used, manipulated and resisted the marriage plot for aesthetic and political ends? Special attention to works by gay and lesbian authors. Readings, which include works of theory as well as imaginative texts, to include such authors as Austen, Diderot, Balzac, Zola, Wilde, Baldwin. (Theme or Identity and Difference) (Same as Women's Studies 278.)

288F Show and Tell: Comics and Graphic Narratives.
In Reading Comics, Douglas Wolk states “The cheap way of referring to them is “comics” or “comic books”; the fancy way is “graphic novels”. Erasing these common prejudices, this class reinforces that comics is a sophisticated and complex medium that bears close affinities with art, film, and literature. This is an introductory study of comics across cultures and within global contexts—Tintin, Astro Boy, Wonder Woman, Watchmen and others—one that emphasizes visual narrative storytelling as well as the socio-political and visual trends that have shaped the powerful creative industry of comics. (Theory or Intermedia) (Same as Art History 288.) N Serrano.

290F Facing Reality: A History of Documentary Cinema.
The history of cinema as representation and interpretation of "reality," focusing on nonfiction film and video from a variety of periods and geographic locales. Emphasis on the ways in which nonfiction films can subvert viewers' conventional expectations and their personal security. Forms to be discussed include the city symphony, ethnographic documentary, propaganda, nature film, direct cinema, cinéma vérité, the compilation film and personal documentary. (Same as Art History 290 and Cinema and Media Studies 290.) MacDonald.

[301F] Cinema as Theory and Critique.
A history of alternatives to commercial movies, focusing on surrealist and dadaist film, visual music, psychodrama, direct cinema, the film society movement, personal cinema, the New American Cinema, structuralism, Queer cinema, feminist cinema, minor cinema, recycled cinema and devotional cinema. While conventional entertainment films use the novel, the short story and the stage drama as their primary instigations, experimental and avant-garde films are analogous to music, poetry, painting, sculpture and collage. Not open to first-year students. (Same as Art History 301 and Cinema and Media Studies 301.)

[318S] Mapping in the Global Renaissance: Cartography & Literature.
Long before Google maps, real and imagined landscapes captivated people. Students will study texts and maps side-by-side, and how they inscribe socio-political and geographical boundaries as well as (de)form cultural identity. Beginning with Ptolemy's Geography we will examine Europe's spatial boundaries within the context of New World "discoveries" and interrogate the interstices between West/non-West in the Mediterranean and the borders of early modern Europe and the New World as depicted in the literary space by Sir Thomas More, Shakespeare, Cabeza de Vaca, Ariosto, Jean de Léry and others Prerequisite, A 200-level course in literature or art history. History and Intermedia Maximum enrollment, 20.

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[365S] Major Figures in Cinema.
Focus on crucial contributors to the wide world of cinema. The work of one, two, or three particular filmmakers, each from a different sector of the geography of cinema, will be examined in detail. Possible filmmakers include Alfred Hitchcock, James Benning, Ross McElwee, Stan Brakhage, Fritz Lang, the Coen brothers. Prerequisite, ARTH/CNMS/CPLIT 120; or ARTH/CNMS/CPLIT 290; or ARTH/CNMS/CPLIT 301; or permission of the instructor. (Same as Art History 365 and Cinema and Media Studies 365.)

[391S] Queer/Feminist Literary Theory.
Contemporary feminist and queer theories have a close connection to literature; they emerged from and later transformed literary studies. We will discuss selected theoretical writing, as well as creative texts from the late nineteenth century to the late twentieth century: fiction, plays, and films. Conversations will center around questions of identity and performativity, and the intersections of gender, sexuality, race and class. Readings to be drawn from the following: Oscar Wilde, Radclyffe Hall, James Baldwin, Audre Lorde, E. M. Forster, Virginia Woolf, Tony Kushner, Cherrie Moraga. Prerequisite, At least one course in Literature and/or Women's Studies, or consent of instructor. (Theory or Identity and Difference) (Same as Cp Lit 391 and Women's Studies 391) (Same as Women's Studies 391.)

460S Beyond Proust.
What do you do after finishing In Search of Lost Time? The easy choice is to read it again. But for those not ready to take the plunge a second time, this course offers an alternative: the study of a group of works that take on special resonances in the context of Proust. Included will be Nabokov’s Lolita, Hitchcock’s Vertigo, Makine’s Dreams of My Russian Summers, Turgenev’s First Love, Jacqueline Rose’s Albertine, Anne Carson’s Albertine Workout, Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury, Goldstein’s The Properties of Light, and others. Prerequisite, CompLit 360 or consent of instructor. Maximum enrollment, 12. P Rabinowitz.

500F Senior Seminar.
Topic: Great Novels and Beach Reading. Despite a variety of compelling attacks on the canon, many of us still have a sense that some novels are better than others—even though we’d be hard pressed to explain why. By placing certified classics against works with lesser reputations, this course will consider the question of literary quality—is it in the reader, in the text, in the culture, elsewhere, or nowhere? Readings to include novels by such writers as Chabon, Kafka, Harold Robbins, Southworth, Faulkner, and Margaret Mitchell, as well as selected essays in narrative theory. Prerequisite, Three courses in literature. Priority given to senior concentrators. Maximum enrollment, 12. Rabinowitz, Peter.

Courses in Literature

131S The Experience of Reading: Books as Stories, Books as Objects.
Consideration not only of stories in books but also the representations of readers and reading within them and about the cultural and physical experience of reading. How have attitudes toward reading changed over time? Works by Bunyan, Franklin, Blake, Austen, Alcott, Stevenson, Haddon, Creech. Workshops using Hamilton's Rare Book and Book Arts collections and manual printing press. (Writing-intensive.) (Theme or Intermedia) Open to first year students only. Maximum enrollment, 20. Thickstun.

204F,S Poetry and Poetics.
This course examines how poems work: how they are constructed, and how they produce meaning, pleasure, and cultural value. We will study poetry in terms of prosody, conventions, history, genre, and reception, with the goal of teaching the essential skills of close reading and contextual interpretation. Readings are primarily from the traditions of poetry written in English. (Writing-intensive.) Prerequisite, For first-years, one course in literature. No prerequisite for upperclass students. (History or Genre) Not open to senior English or Creative Writing concentrators. Maximum enrollment, 20. The Department.

216S Caribbean Literature in the Crucible.
A critical overview of Caribbean literatures in the light of the complex legacies that have given rise to a body of creative work that seems to constantly fashion and refashion itself. Such literary recasting helps to communicate an intricate history of genocides, survival, exile, resistance, endurance, and outward migrations. Particular attention to writers such as Roger Mias, Martin Carter, George Lamming, Derek Walcott, Patricia Powell, Earl Lovelace, Paule Marshall and Michelle Cliff. (post-1900). Prerequisite, One course in literature. (History or Identity and Difference) (Same as Africana Studies 216.) Odamtten.

[218F] Literatures of Witness.
Witness literature is testimonial by individuals who have suffered injustice incurred not as a result of what they have done but of what they are, as in Holocaust and slave narrative. We will study this literature and ask how its definition might be adapted to an era that has seen wide growth in systems of police action. We will read classic witness texts, work by political prisoners and by ‘common criminals’: writers who have been convicted for violations of law but also challenge collectively experienced limits on life opportunities, such as those imposed by race, class, and/or gender. (Theory or Identity and Difference)

221F Introduction to Old English.
Exploration of the language, literature and culture of early medieval England, from the Anglo-Saxon invasion through the Norman Conquest. Emphasis on reading and translating Old English prose and poetry, as well as developing an understanding of its cultural context. Culminates with a reading of Beowulf in translation (pre-1660). Offered in alternate years. Prerequisite, One course in literature. (History) Terrell.

222F Chaucer: Gender and Genre.
Examines how Chaucer engages and transforms prevailing medieval ideas of gender and genre. Particular emphasis on his constructions of masculinity and femininity in relation to themes of sex, religion, social power and narrative authority. Readings include Troilus and Criseyde and The Canterbury Tales in Middle English, as well as select medieval sources and modern criticism (pre-1660). (Writing-intensive.) Prerequisite, one course in literature or AP 4 or 5 in English. (History or Single-Author) Maximum enrollment, 20. Terrell.

[223S] Gender and Violence in the Middle Ages.
This course serves as an introduction to the field of Medieval and Renaissance Studies. Drawing on multiple disciplinary perspectives, including those of literature, law, history, and art, we will examine the intersection of ideas about the body, gender, and violence in the European Middle Ages. Readings may include the Bible and early patristic writings; the lives of saints; poems and advice manuals on courtly love; depictions of women in the Crusades; Icelandic sagas; and perspectives on the trial of Joan of Arc. Prerequisite, One 100-level course in literature or history, or AP 4 or 5 in English or history. (Same as Literature and Creative Writing 223 and History 223 and Medieval and Renaissance Studies 223.) Maximum enrollment, 24.

255F The Marrow of African-American Literature.
Exploration of how African-Americans, in the face of enslavement, exclusion and terror, produced literature expressing their identities and aspirations. In examining themes such as abduction, separation and resistance, students will assess the inscription of self on the emergent national culture by writers such as Olaudah Equiano, Phillis Wheatley, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Wilson, Frances Harper, Sutton Griggs and Charles Chesnutt (1660-1900). Prerequisite, One course in literature, or consent of instructor. (History or Identity and Difference) Open to sophomores and juniors only. (Same as Africana Studies 255.) Odamtten.

256S American Literature of the 19th Century.
Survey of representative literary texts in their historical, social and aesthetic contexts. Attention to issues of access to the literary market and the cultural work of literature, particularly in figuring the rise of a distinctly American tradition. Readings from such writers as Cooper, Brown, Poe, Emerson, Whitman, Hawthorne, Melville, Douglass, Dickinson, Jewett, Clemens, Chestnutt and James (1660-1900). Prerequisite, One course in literature. (History or Identity and Difference) Not open to seniors except with permission of the department. Rippeon.

[266S] US Modernisms.
Effects of the international modernist movement on the literature of the United States from the beginnings of the 20th century to the 1950s. Attention to authors such as Ellison, Faulkner, Hemingway, Hurston, Stein, and Stevens. (post-1900). Prerequisite, One course in literature, or consent of instructor. (History or Identity and Difference) Not open to first-year students or seniors.

[267F] Literature and the Environment.
Surveys the history of environmentalist thinking as it has been reflected in literary texts. Examines key ideas of environmentalism and questions of representation, literary value and political relevance. Authors include Thoreau, Faulkner, Abbey, Lopez and Jeffers, as well as a few non-American writers. Texts include memoirs, essays, novels and poems. (Genre or Theme) Open to sophomores, juniors and seniors, and to first-year students with AP 4 or 5 in English..

283F Introduction to Asian American Literature.
Examination of themes, forms, and history of literary production by people of Asian descent in the United States. We will survey translated and English-language works by Asian American writers of varying ethnic affiliations, including Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, Korean, Indian, and others. We’ll explore how each writer negotiates a relationship with a particular cultural heritage, as well as confronts the racial, cultural, and political formations of the U.S.. Authors include Maxine Hong Kingston, Carlos Bulosan, John Okada, the Angel Island poets, and others. Prerequisite, One course in literature. (post-1900) (Theory or Identity and Difference) (Same as American Studies 283.) Yao.

[293F] The Making of English.
History of the English language from its origins in Old English to its present-day proliferation into World English(es). Particular attention to how the internal development of English (its sound system, syntax, grammar and vocabulary) relates to political and cultural transformations among English-speaking peoples throughout history, and how the English language continues to provoke political and cultural controversy. Offered in alternate years. Prerequisite, One course in literature, or consent of instructor. (Theme)

[295S] Literary CSI: Casebooks.
Through an introduction to literary theory, students will carefully examine and discuss a variety of literary texts by such writers as Toni Morrison, Kazuo Ishiguro, June Jordan, Carolyn Forche, Samuel Beckett, and Athol Fugard. In addition, students will communicate their insights in casebooks that examine the texts from multiple critical perspectives. Prerequisite, One course in literature. (Theory or Theme) Open to first-year and sophomore students only.

315F Literary Theory and Literary Study.
In this course we will explore some of the main developments in literary and cultural "theory" during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Topics may include historicism, formalism, structuralism, deconstruction, Marxism, and feminism, theories of race, nation, and sexuality, of materiality and the digital, and even of the resistance to theory. (Writing-intensive.) Prerequisite, a 200-level course in literature. (Theory or Identity and Difference) Maximum enrollment, 20. Yao.

[323S] Medieval Other Worlds.
From the spiritual realms of heaven and hell to the supernatural world of fairies, medieval culture was immersed in alternative and transcendent versions of reality. Explores medieval literature's frequent forays beyond ordinary experience in Middle English works by the Pearl-poet, Chaucer, Malory and Langland, as well as anonymous romance and drama. (pre-1660). (Writing-intensive.) Prerequisite, one 200-level course in literature. Not open to first-year students. (History) Maximum enrollment, 20.

[327S] English Renaissance Literature: 1550-1660.
Study of the ways works and writers of this period are "in conversation" with each other on such matters as love, death, religious belief, the human response to the natural world and the role of women (in society and as authors). Readings of poems and other works by such writers as Shakespeare, Spenser, Donne, Herbert and Mary Wroth (pre-1660). (Writing-intensive.) Prerequisite, one 200-level course in literature. Not open to first-year students. (History or Intermedia) Open to sophomores, juniors and seniors. Maximum enrollment, 20.

[330F] English Comedy and Tragedy, 1580-1780.
Study of tragedies and comedies from the time of Shakespeare through the end of the 18th century, with special attention to changes in the representation of masculinity and femininity before and after 1660, when women first became participants in London’s professional theater as actors and playwrights. Plays include Shakespeare’s Antony and Cleopatra (c. 1606) and Dryden’s version of the same tragedy in All for Love (1677), and works by such writers as Ben Jonson, John Webster, Aphra Behn, and Hannah Cowley (pre-1660). (Writing-intensive.) (Writing-intensive.) Prerequisite, one 200-level course in literature. (History or Genre) Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Maximum enrollment, 20.

334F Seminar: Jane Austen: Text and Film.
Close reading and discussion of Austen's six published novels. Attention to questions of genre raised by treatments of the novels in film and television productions (1660-1900). Prerequisite, three courses in literature. (Intermedia or Single-Author) Open to juniors and seniors only. Does not fulfill the senior seminar requirement for the English concentration. Maximum enrollment, 12. J O'Neill.

[335F] The Romantic Poets.
The Romantic Period in English literary history has long been defined by the work of six male poets: Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Keats, and Byron. We will study their poetry in the context of form, history, and politics, and investigate how their work might be seen to form an ideology or movement. We will also read work by poets such as Barbauld, Clare, Burns, and Hemans, popular in their own day, but thought of as ‘minor’ subsequently, in order to evaluate how questions of gender and literary value inform our sense of what is ‘Romantic’. (1660-1900). (Writing-intensive.) Prerequisite, one 200-level course in literature. (History or Genre) Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Maximum enrollment, 20.

[342F] Seminar: Written on the Wall: 20th-Century American Prison Writing.
The writing of the men and women inside the American prison system constitutes a kind of shadow canon to that of better-known literary artists. We will read broadly in 20th- and 21st-century American prison writing, asking questions about the generic coherence, social and moral import of prisoners' non-fiction, fiction and poetry. Authors will include Jack London, George Jackson, Assata Shakur, and citizens serving time today. Students who are twenty-one or older will visit a book group inside a state prison. Prerequisite, one 200-level course in literature. (post-1900) (History or Identity and Difference) Open to juniors and seniors only. Does not fulfill the senior seminar requirement for ENGL or LIT concentration. (Same as American Studies 342.) Maximum enrollment, 12.

343S Seminar: Women Writing Against the Grain.
A comparative investigation of U.S. women writing their own stories through the genre of autobiography in the 19th and 20th centuries. Attention to theoretical and practical questions of ideology, genre, language, audience and reception. Particular focus on women's self-representation as hegemonic transgression at the intersections of race, class, gender, sexuality, nationality and ableism. (Writing-intensive.) Prerequisite, One course in Women's Studies and some coursework in comparative literature or literary theory or consent of the instructor. (Same as Women's Studies 343.) Maximum enrollment, 12. Jones, Cara.

[353F] Anglo-American Modernism.
Principal trends in Modernist literature written in the United States and the United Kingdom roughly from 1900-45. Examination of the contours of the primary tradition, as well as attention to counter-traditions that evolved alongside the accepted canon. Readings of poems, novels and stories by such writers as Yeats, James, Conrad, Joyce, Woolf, Eliot, Pound, Lewis, Ford, West and Loy will provide the context for understanding the larger trajectory of Modernism together with the opportunity for more detailed consideration of specific individual writers (post-1900). (Writing-intensive.) Prerequisite, one 200-level course in literature. (History or Intermedia) Open to sophomores, juniors and seniors. Maximum enrollment, 20.

[374S] The Hollywood Novel.
A look at novels dealing with or set in Hollywood and at adaptations of novels to film. Students will write short screen adaptations from short fiction and work together as a team (or in teams) on digital video productions of one or more student screenplays (post-1900). (Writing-intensive.) Prerequisite, one 200-level literature course on narrative fiction and one of the following: 215, Art 213, 313, 377 or College 300. (Genre or Intermedia) Open to juniors and seniors only. Maximum enrollment, 20.

[375S] Contemporary American Fiction.
Study of short stories and novels by authors writing in the past 30 years, such as Barth, Acker, Hawkes, Morrison, DeLillo, Mazza, Wideman, Anaya, Kingston, Proulx (post-1900). Prerequisite, one 200-level course in literature (205 or 266 preferred). Not open to first-year students. (Theme or Theory) Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.

[376F] Africana Literatures and Critical Discourses.
An examination of literature produced by writers of former European colonies in Africa and its Diaspora, with particular attention to literary and theoretical issues, as well as responses to such developments as Negritude, feminism and post-colonialism. Readings will include selected twentieth and twenty-first century writers. Assignments will involve both written and digital work. (Post 1900) (Writing-intensive.) Prerequisite, one 200-level course in literature. Not open to first-year students. (Theory or Intermedia) Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. (Same as Africana Studies 376.) Maximum enrollment, 20.

[378S] African American Literature Beyond the Edge.
A critical survey of literatures from multiple genres concerned with conjuration, speculation, investigation, transgression or science fiction produced by African-American writers from the 19th century to the present. Includes works by such writers as Chesnutt, Sutton Griggs, W. E. B. Du Bois, Fisher, Chester Himes, Ernest Gaines, Octavia Butler, Walter Mosley, Steve Barnes, Jewelle Gomez, Samuel Delaney, Gayle Jones, Derrick Bell, Paula Woods, Tananarive Due and Nalo Hopkinson. (Post-1900) (Writing-intensive.) Prerequisite, One 200-level course in literature. (Genre or Identity and Difference) Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. (Same as Africana Studies 378.) Maximum enrollment, 20.

[428S] Seminar: Muslims, Women and Jews: Alterity and Identity in the Middle Ages.
How did medieval Christians perceive difference and define the boundaries of identity? Study of medieval literature dealing with disenfranchised populations within European Christian society (women and Jews) and those outside its bounds (Muslims). Readings by authors such as Chaucer, Margery Kempe and John Mandeville, as well as anonymous dramas and crusade romances, and modern criticism. Particular consideration of literary and cultural contexts, including sermon stories, histories, medical and legal texts, polemics and religious tracts (pre-1700). Prerequisite, three courses in literature. Open to juniors and seniors only. Maximum enrollment, 12.

[459S] Seminar: TransAtlantic Romanticisms.
Exploration of Romantic ideologies in literature (poetry and novels) from England and the United States. Discussion of nationalism, nature, individualism, and imagination as they appear in authors including Wordsworth, Byron, Scott, Cooper, Whitman, Dickinson, and Melville. Attention to the paradox of influence in asserting notions of national identity. (1660-1900) Prerequisite, three courses in literature. Open to juniors and seniors only. Maximum enrollment, 12.

[473] Seminar: Major African Writers.
A comprehensive comparative investigation into works by two or more contemporary African writers. Attention to theoretical and practical questions of ideology, genre, language, gender, class and geographic region to determine the multiple articulations among authors, texts and audiences (post-1900). Prerequisite, three courses in literature or consent of instructor. Open to juniors and seniors only. (Same as Africana Studies 473/573.) Maximum enrollment, 12.

474S Seminar: Major African-American Writers.
An in-depth investigation of selected 20th-century and contemporary works by African-American writers. Focus on the theoretical and practical questions of genre, language, gender, class and ideology to determine the multiple articulations among authors, texts and audiences. Traditional written assignments, critical discussion and digital media coursework in the computer lab are required (post-1900). Prerequisite, three courses in literature. Open to juniors and seniors only. Odamtten.

500S Honors Thesis.
Independent study for honors candidates in English, culminating in a thesis. Prerequisite, approval of the department. The Department.

Courses in Comparative Literature

[120S] Introduction to the History and Theory of Film.
A general introduction to the wide world of cinema and cinema studies, focusing on crucial films from many cinematic traditions. Topics include the evolution of film from earlier forms of motion picture, the articulation and exploitation of a narrative language for cinema, the development of typical commercial genres, and the appearance of a variety of forms of critical cinema. Focuses on basic film terminology, with the cinematic apparatus and ongoing theoretical conversation about cinema and its audience. (Same as Cinema and Media Studies 120 and Art History 120.)

[143] Literature on Trials.
Why are trials so fascinating? Our emphasis will be on the ways they clarify values, establishing borders between acceptable and unacceptable behavior, with attention to how they enforce cultural norms concerning race, gender, and sexuality. We will discuss literary and cultural representations of historical trials, such as those of Socrates, Joan of Arc, Galileo, the Salem Witches, and Oscar Wilde. Course materials to include readings from Aeschylus, Plato, Shaw, Brecht, Stendhal, Kafka, Camus, Morrison, as well as films and other primary and secondary sources. (Writing-intensive.) (Proseminar.) (Theme or Identity and Difference) Open to first-year students only. Maximum enrollment, 16.

146S (Re)Discovering Latin American in Literature.
In 1492 Columbus sailed the ocean blue… to unfamiliar lands that were shocking, provocative and elusive. This course examines the ‘discovery’ of America, transcultural encounters, and the myths of/from America (paradise, utopia & lost cities of gold) in literature. Readings span from Mesoamerican stories (Aztec, Maya, Inca), New World voices (Inca Garcilaso, Guamán Poma) to modern Latin American writers & artists (Borges, Saer, Carpentier, Cortázar, Lam, Kahlo, Varos & others). (Writing-intensive.) Not open to students who have taken 100-level Comparative Literature, Literature or English courses. (History, Identity and Difference). Maximum enrollment, 20. N Serrano.

[152F] Literature and Ethics.
Study of literature as a vehicle for moral and political concerns and of the ways that literature shapes its readers. Special emphasis on popular literature, feminist criticism and the problems raised by censorship and pornography. Selected novels and plays by such writers as Ibsen, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Hemingway, Wright, Highsmith, Doris Lessing, Burgess and others. (Writing-intensive.) (Proseminar.) (Theme) Open to first-year students only. Maximum enrollment, 16.

[210S] Modern and Contemporary Chinese Literature: Traditions and Modernities.
Since 1919, Chinese literature has played a decisive role in interactions between tradition and modernity. This course examines the development of Chinese literature against such interactions. Students will familiarize themselves with the most representative modern and contemporary Chinese literary works and gain a broad understanding of many modernity-related issues, including politics, culture, class, labor division, ethnicity, gender and sexuality. All lectures and discussions in English. Requirements: presentations, class discussions, film viewings and a final paper. (Same as East Asian Languages and Literatures 210.)

211F Early Storytellers in World Literature.
Great ‘masterpieces’ have been inscribed on cave walls, papyrus, tapestries, parchment (goatskin), and paper in order to comment upon the world. This course examines the human condition through a comparative study of mythology, epic, narrative, and poetry, from ancient Mesopotamia and Greece to the Roman Empire through to the Renaissance period. It pays special attention to how sexuality, identity, and politics play in the representation of diverse societies in Innana, The Odyssey, The Golden Ass, El Cid, Les Lais, 1001 Nights, The Pillow Book, Veronica Franco’s poetry, and others. (Writing-intensive.) (History) Maximum enrollment, 20. N Serrano.

[212S] Readings in World Literature II.
Study of representative texts in world literature from 1800 to the present, including novels, short fiction, and drama. Particular attention paid to the concepts of class, self and society, and they way they are intertwined with forms of narrative and drama. Readings to include works by such writers as Goethe, Balzac, Austen, Chekhov, Kafka, Hagedorn, Roy. (Writing-intensive.) (History) May be taken without 211. Maximum enrollment, 20.

225F Madness, Murder and Mayhem: Nineteenth-Century Russian Literature.
Readings of representative works with emphasis on major literary movements, cultural history, and basic literary devices. Primary texts by Pushkin, Gogol, Turgenev, Dostoevsky and Tolstoy, as well as some critical materials. (Writing-intensive.) No knowledge of Russian required. (Same as Russian Studies 225.) Maximum enrollment, 20. Bartle.

[226S] Sex, Death and Revolution: Twentieth-Century Russian Art and Literature.
Close analysis of major literary and artistic movements of the 20th century, with particular attention paid to the innovations of the avant-garde and the impact of the Bolshevik Revolution on the artistic imagination. Emphasis on the recurring theme of the fate of the individual in a mass society. No knowledge of Russian required. (Same as Russian Studies 226.)

[234S] The Hero as Failure: Nineteenth-Century Russian Literature.
Why does so much classic Russian literature center on weak male protagonists unable to come to terms with stronger, more adaptable women? This course will explore this repeated pattern both as a reflection of Russian attitudes toward love and as a metaphorical expression of political frustration in a repressive society. Readings to include fiction, plays, and criticism by such writers as Pushkin, Lermontov, Belinsky, Gogol, Turgenev, Chernyshevsky, Dostoevsky, and Chekhov. Prerequisite, A 100-level course in literature. Open to students who have taken LIT/RSNST 225. (History, Theme) (Same as Russian Studies 234.)

[235] Love, Family and Loneliness in Modern Japanese Literature.
Love has always been a central theme in Japanese literature. Focuses on how Japanese writers of the modern period (particularly late 19th century to the present) depict the struggle with new concepts and forms of "love" and relationships. As well as basic readings about modern Japanese history and culture, assigned texts range from canonical work, various forms of early twentieth-century modernist mystery, technical and avant-garde writings, to contemporary "coming of age" novels. We will also examine such media as cartoons and films. Readings and discussion in English. (Same as East Asian Languages and Literatures 235.)

239/339F Modern Japan: Japanese Culture and Society From A(-Bomb) to (Dragon Ball)Z.
This course explores issues of imperialism, military conflict, pacifism, nuclear victimhood, foreign occupation, national identity, and social responsibility in 19th to 21st-century Japan. Materials include nonfiction, science fiction, poetry, war propaganda, novels, censorship documents, animé, and film. Taught in English. No knowledge of Japanese language or history required. (Same as East Asian Languages and Literatures 239/339.) Omori.

[244F] Tragedy: Then and Now.
How did Greek tragedy work in the city of Athens? Athens was a radical democracy but was based on slave labor and the exclusion of women. How is this implied contradiction displayed in the works of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides? But tragedy also has contemporary life. How do these plays transcend their time of production? An opportunity to examine relations of gods/humans, fate/choice, as well as gender, class/ethnicity and sexuality. Readings to include works by Seneca, Racine, Sartre, O’Neill, Heaney, Fugard. (Genre) (Same as Theatre 244 and Classics 244.)

[258/358S] Opera.
Study of literary and musical dimensions of operas by major composers from Monteverdi and Mozart to the present. Emphasis on the transformation of independent texts into librettos and the effects of music as it reflects language and dramatic action. Includes such works as Orfeo, The Marriage of Figaro, Otello, The Turn of the Screw and Candide. Prerequisite, two courses in music or two in literature, or one in each field, or consent of instructors. Music 358 has an additional independent project. Registration at the 300-level only with instructor's permission. (Same as Music 258/358 and Literature and Creative Writing 258/358 and Literature and Creative Writing 258/358.) Maximum enrollment, 24.

[270] Heaven, Hell and the Space in Between: Devils and Deities in Russian Literature and Art.
Examination of the portrayals of the cosmic conflict: Good vs. Evil, Heaven vs. Hell, God vs. Satan. The second half of the semester will be dedicated to a close reading and analysis of Fyodor Dostoevsky's Brothers Karamazov. (Writing-intensive.) No knowledge of Russian required. (Same as Russian Studies 270.) Maximum enrollment, 20.

[278S] The Straight Story?: Rethinking the Romance.
A study of the ways in which various forms of sexual desire (overt or closeted) drive the plot of literary works. How is desire constructed? How have authors used, manipulated and resisted the marriage plot for aesthetic and political ends? Special attention to works by gay and lesbian authors. Readings, which include works of theory as well as imaginative texts, to include such authors as Austen, Diderot, Balzac, Zola, Wilde, Baldwin. (Theme or Identity and Difference) (Same as Women's Studies 278.)

288F Show and Tell: Comics and Graphic Narratives.
In Reading Comics, Douglas Wolk states “The cheap way of referring to them is “comics” or “comic books”; the fancy way is “graphic novels”. Erasing these common prejudices, this class reinforces that comics is a sophisticated and complex medium that bears close affinities with art, film, and literature. This is an introductory study of comics across cultures and within global contexts—Tintin, Astro Boy, Wonder Woman, Watchmen and others—one that emphasizes visual narrative storytelling as well as the socio-political and visual trends that have shaped the powerful creative industry of comics. (Theory or Intermedia) (Same as Art History 288.) N Serrano.

290F Facing Reality: A History of Documentary Cinema.
The history of cinema as representation and interpretation of "reality," focusing on nonfiction film and video from a variety of periods and geographic locales. Emphasis on the ways in which nonfiction films can subvert viewers' conventional expectations and their personal security. Forms to be discussed include the city symphony, ethnographic documentary, propaganda, nature film, direct cinema, cinéma vérité, the compilation film and personal documentary. (Same as Art History 290 and Cinema and Media Studies 290.) MacDonald.

[301F] Cinema as Theory and Critique.
A history of alternatives to commercial movies, focusing on surrealist and dadaist film, visual music, psychodrama, direct cinema, the film society movement, personal cinema, the New American Cinema, structuralism, Queer cinema, feminist cinema, minor cinema, recycled cinema and devotional cinema. While conventional entertainment films use the novel, the short story and the stage drama as their primary instigations, experimental and avant-garde films are analogous to music, poetry, painting, sculpture and collage. Not open to first-year students. (Same as Art History 301 and Cinema and Media Studies 301.)

[318S] Mapping in the Global Renaissance: Cartography & Literature.
Long before Google maps, real and imagined landscapes captivated people. Students will study texts and maps side-by-side, and how they inscribe socio-political and geographical boundaries as well as (de)form cultural identity. Beginning with Ptolemy's Geography we will examine Europe's spatial boundaries within the context of New World "discoveries" and interrogate the interstices between West/non-West in the Mediterranean and the borders of early modern Europe and the New World as depicted in the literary space by Sir Thomas More, Shakespeare, Cabeza de Vaca, Ariosto, Jean de Léry and others Prerequisite, A 200-level course in literature or art history. History and Intermedia Maximum enrollment, 20.

356 .

[365S] Major Figures in Cinema.
Focus on crucial contributors to the wide world of cinema. The work of one, two, or three particular filmmakers, each from a different sector of the geography of cinema, will be examined in detail. Possible filmmakers include Alfred Hitchcock, James Benning, Ross McElwee, Stan Brakhage, Fritz Lang, the Coen brothers. Prerequisite, ARTH/CNMS/CPLIT 120; or ARTH/CNMS/CPLIT 290; or ARTH/CNMS/CPLIT 301; or permission of the instructor. (Same as Art History 365 and Cinema and Media Studies 365.)

[391S] Queer/Feminist Literary Theory.
Contemporary feminist and queer theories have a close connection to literature; they emerged from and later transformed literary studies. We will discuss selected theoretical writing, as well as creative texts from the late nineteenth century to the late twentieth century: fiction, plays, and films. Conversations will center around questions of identity and performativity, and the intersections of gender, sexuality, race and class. Readings to be drawn from the following: Oscar Wilde, Radclyffe Hall, James Baldwin, Audre Lorde, E. M. Forster, Virginia Woolf, Tony Kushner, Cherrie Moraga. Prerequisite, At least one course in Literature and/or Women's Studies, or consent of instructor. (Theory or Identity and Difference) (Same as Cp Lit 391 and Women's Studies 391) (Same as Women's Studies 391.)

460S Beyond Proust.
What do you do after finishing In Search of Lost Time? The easy choice is to read it again. But for those not ready to take the plunge a second time, this course offers an alternative: the study of a group of works that take on special resonances in the context of Proust. Included will be Nabokov’s Lolita, Hitchcock’s Vertigo, Makine’s Dreams of My Russian Summers, Turgenev’s First Love, Jacqueline Rose’s Albertine, Anne Carson’s Albertine Workout, Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury, Goldstein’s The Properties of Light, and others. Prerequisite, CompLit 360 or consent of instructor. Maximum enrollment, 12. P Rabinowitz.

500F Senior Seminar.
Topic: Great Novels and Beach Reading. Despite a variety of compelling attacks on the canon, many of us still have a sense that some novels are better than others—even though we’d be hard pressed to explain why. By placing certified classics against works with lesser reputations, this course will consider the question of literary quality—is it in the reader, in the text, in the culture, elsewhere, or nowhere? Readings to include novels by such writers as Chabon, Kafka, Harold Robbins, Southworth, Faulkner, and Margaret Mitchell, as well as selected essays in narrative theory. Prerequisite, Three courses in literature. Priority given to senior concentrators. Maximum enrollment, 12. Rabinowitz, Peter.

Courses in Creative Writing

215F,S Introductory Poetry and Fiction Workshop.
Introduction to fundamental techniques of fiction and poetry. Regular writing and reading assignments as well as critiques in class. (Proseminar.) Prerequisite, a 100-level writing-intensive course in English or Literature or 204W, 222W, or 227W. Not open to first-year students in the fall. Maximum enrollment, 16. The Department.

224F Playwriting.
Introduction to the techniques of realistic and non-realistic playwriting through a variety of exercises and improvisations, culminating in the writing and staging of a one-act play. Prerequisite, Theatre 100,130 or a 100-level writing-intensive course in English or English 204, or consent of the instructor. While no prior acting experience is required, students participate in staged readings of works. (Same as Theatre 224.) Maximum enrollment, 16. Latrell.

304F,S Intermediate Poetry Workshop.
For students whose work and purpose have developed sufficiently to warrant continuing work in poetry. Regular writing and reading assignments as well as critiques in class. Prerequisite, 204 and 215. Maximum enrollment, 16. The Department.

305F,S Intermediate Fiction Workshop.
For students whose work and purpose have developed sufficiently to warrant continuing work in fiction. Regular writing and reading assignments as well as critiques in class. Prerequisite, 215 and a 200-level course in literature. Maximum enrollment, 16. The Department.

309S Creative Non-Fiction Workshop.
For students whose work and purpose in creative writing have developed sufficiently to warrant work in creative non-fiction. This course will focus on food-writing in some of the following genres: personal essay, profile, narrative essay, journalism. Regular writing and reading assignments as well as critiques in class. Prerequisite, one 100-level course in literature or permission of the instructor. (Genre) Maximum enrollment, 16. Ngo.

419S Seminar: Creative Writing.
For students whose work and purpose have developed sufficiently to warrant advanced work in fiction or poetry. Students will construct individual projects leading to a final collection of writings in the form of a novella, a series of stories, or a series of poems. Regular writing and reading assignments, as well as critiques in class. Prerequisite, 304 and 305. Open only to senior concentrators and, if there is room, senior minors. Maximum enrollment, 12. Prerequisite, 304 and 305. Open only to senior concentrators and, if there is room, senior minors. Maximum enrollment, 12. The Department.

498F Honors Project in Creative Writing.
Independent study under the supervision of creative writing faculty, for honors candidates who qualify for and wish to pursue honors in creative writing. Students completing 498 are expected to continue their creative writing honor's project in the spring term by enrolling in 501S. Prerequisite, 215, 304, 305, and permission of Department. Students will be assigned to CW faculty for the project. Maximum enrollment, 8. Tina Hall.

501S Honors Project.
Independent study for honors candidates in Creative Writing. Prerequisite, 498S and approval of the department. 1/4 credit .

Courses in English

[122F] Literary CSI: Case Studies and Insights.
Through a forensic or close analysis and discussion of selected texts by writers such as John Donne, Shakespeare, Poe, Melville, Edna St Vincent Millay, Dylan Thomas, Toni Morrison, Sonia Sanchez and August Wilson (considered in their contexts), students will acquire the skills necessary for critical thinking and communication of their insights about literature. (Writing-intensive.) (Proseminar.) (Theory or Genre) Open to first-year students only. Maximum enrollment, 16.

123S Days of a Future Past.
Reading a variety of works that may be described as fantastic or speculative and written by authors from different cultures, we shall discuss and write about these texts in order to develop and improve students' critical reading, thinking, and writing skills. (Writing-intensive.) (Genre or Identity and Difference) Open to first-year students and sophomores who have not take a 100-or 200-level course in Comparative Literature, English, or Literature. Maximum enrollment, 20. Odamtten.

[124F] The Literary Animal.
Humans have always been deeply interested in animals, and literature reflects this interest in many ways. We’ll examine the complexity of representing animals in literature by reading poetry, novels, and plays that reflect the human/animal divide, imagine being animal, or use animals as symbols. We’ll also discuss how these texts reveal philosophical and moral issues that arise from our relationships with animals. Texts include Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels, London’s Call of the Wild, and Barbara Gowdy’s The White Bone. We’ll also read a range of poetry. (Writing-intensive.) (Proseminar.) (Theme or Identity and Difference) Open to first-year students only. Maximum enrollment, 16.

125F Monsters.
A focus on monsters and the monstrous in literature. Readings will include Beowulf, Frankenstein, Dracula, stories by Poe and Angela Carter, a selection of poems, and the movie Aliens. Throughout the semester, we will question what makes something monstrous and how monsters function in literature and culture. We will also examine how monsters intersect with the categories of gender, race, sexuality and class. (Writing-intensive.) (Proseminar.) (Theme or Identity and Difference) Proseminar open to first-year students only in Fall. Writing Intensive in Spring and open to first-year students and sophomores who have NOT taken a 100- or 200-level course in Comparative Literature, English, or Literature.. Maximum enrollment, 16. Hall.

129F Truth and Justice, the American Way.
Truth is often a difficult thing to determine. The difficulty is compounded when the stakes of debate over the truth are high, as they are in searching for justice for individuals or communities. We will read poetry, drama, fiction and films that suggest the peculiarly American factors that shape notions of truth when justice is under debate. We will read recognized literary authors such as Hawthorne, Melville, and Baldwin, as well as lesser-known writers who experienced imprisonment. (Writing-intensive.) (History or Identity and Difference) Maximum enrollment, 16. Larson.

145S Literature and/of Empowerment.
Literature has always played important roles in the cultivation of personal, social, and political empowerment. This course explores a range of debates surrounding literature as a means of individual and group empowerment, issues including the cultural politics of representation; the dynamics of different forms of literary address such as testimony, protest, narrative, and abstraction; the construction of personal and group identity and difference; and writing as a tool for self empowerment. (Writing-intensive.) (Proseminar.) (Genre or Identity and Difference) Open to 1st years only. Maximum enrollment, 16. Steven Yao.

206F,S The Study of the Novel.
Forms of prose fiction since the 18th century. Attention to the primary structural features of the novel and the relations of narrative forms to social and historical contexts. Prerequisite, One course in literature. (History or Genre). Open to first-year students in the spring semester only. Not open to students who have taken English 205. The Department.

227F Shakespeare.
Survey of selected plays (pre-1660). Prerequisite, One course in literature. No prerequisite for seniors. (Single-Author or Genre) Not open to students who have taken English 225. The Department.

228S Milton.
Study of Milton’s English poetry and major prose, with particular attention to Paradise Lost. Topics for consideration include Milton’s ideas on Christian heroism, individual conscience, the relations between the sexes and the purpose of education (1660-1900). (Genre or Single-Author) Not open to those who have taken English 226 or to first-year students. Thickstun.

313F Ghanaian Literature: From Colony to Post-Colony.
Through a close examination of selected works by West African writers such as Kobina Sekyi, Casley-Hayford, Mabel Dove, Ayi Kwei Armah, Efua Sutherland, Ama Ata Aidoo, Kofi Awoonor, Atukwei Okai, Yaw Asare, Akosua Busia, Kofi Anyidoho and Amma Darko, students will examine how the Slave Castles, the Sankofa Bird and Ananse the Spider have shaped the manner in which Ghanaian writers portray their society (post-1900). (Writing-intensive.) Prerequisite, one 200-level course in literature (204, 205, 206 or 264 preferred). (History or Identity and Difference) (Same as Africana Studies 313.) Maximum enrollment, 20. Odamtten.

[442F] Seminar: Booked: Prison Writing.
Prisons have been the settings for scenes of tragedy, comedy, romance and social protest. While aware of this use of the prison as a literary device, we will read writers who have actually suffered incarceration. We will read canonical texts (by Plato, Boethius, King), post-colonial prison writers (Abani, Thiong'o), and the work of men and women inside the American prison system. Among other requirements, students will read work by and visit men in a writing class taught inside Attica Correctional Facility. Prerequisite, three courses in literature. Open to juniors and seniors only. Does not fulfill the senior seminar requirement for the English concentration. Maximum enrollment, 12.

[447S] Seminar: James Joyce.
In-depth study of Joyce's major works in their historical and cultural contexts. Readings include Dubliners and Finnegans Wake, Major emphasis on Ulysses. Prerequisite, three courses in literature. Open to juniors and seniors only. post-1900 Maximum enrollment, 12.

(from the Hamilton Course Catalogue)

Contact Information


Comparative Literature Department

198 College Hill Road
Clinton, NY 13323
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