A NATIONAL LEADER in teaching students to write effectively, learn from each other and think for themselves A NATIONAL LEADER in teaching students to write effectively, learn from each other and think for themselves A NATIONAL LEADER in teaching students to write effectively, learn from each other and think for themselves A NATIONAL LEADER in teaching students to write effectively, learn from each other and think for themselves A NATIONAL LEADER in teaching students to write effectively, learn from each other and think for themselves A NATIONAL LEADER in teaching students to write effectively, learn from each other and think for themselves A NATIONAL LEADER in teaching students to write effectively, learn from each other and think for themselves A NATIONAL LEADER in teaching students to write effectively, learn from each other and think for themselves A NATIONAL LEADER in teaching students to write effectively, learn from each other and think for themselves A NATIONAL LEADER in teaching students to write effectively, learn from each other and think for themselves A NATIONAL LEADER in teaching students to write effectively, learn from each other and think for themselves A NATIONAL LEADER in teaching students to write effectively, learn from each other and think for themselves A NATIONAL LEADER in teaching students to write effectively, learn from each other and think for themselves
A NATIONAL LEADER
in teaching students
to write effectively,
learn from each other
and think for themselves

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Performing Arts to Present Shakespeare’s Much Ado about Nothing - The American Shakespeare Center will perform Much Ado about Nothing on Saturday, Nov. 1, at 7:30 p.m., in Wellin Hall, Schambach Center.

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CATEGORY

Writing for Clarity

passive voice

Passive voice produces a sentence in which the subject receives an action. In contrast, active voice produces a sentence in which the subject performs an action. Passive voice often produces unclear, wordy sentences, whereas active voice produces generally clearer, more concise sentences. To change a sentence from passive to active voice, determine who or what performs the action, and use that person or thing as the subject of the sentence. Passive voice: "On April 19, 1775, arms were seized at Concord, precipitating the American Revolution." Active voice: "On April 19, 1775, British soldiers seized arms at Concord, precipitating the American Revolution."

SOURCE: Nesbitt-Johnston Writing Center